christian-film

anonymous asked:

oh, you mean American Hustle, the movie where she played one of the main characters?

Sure, she played one of the main characters, but that doesn’t mean she had the same amount of screen time as her co-stars.

I found an article that has the screen times-

Mr. Cassidy wagered that there wasn’t much of a gap in the screen time between the two nominated leads of his film. But Christian Bale actually has 60 minutes of screen to Amy Adams’s 46 minutes, a significant difference even in an ensemble movie. Among their supporting category counterparts, Bradley Cooper’s 41 screen minutes double Jennifer Lawrence’s 20.

So yeah, maybe she got paid less because she was in the movie WAY less? Nah, let’s just call it sexism. 

huge film rec list
  • films about teenagers and coming of age: ghost world, a bronx tale, the breakfast club, girl interrupted, perks of being a wallflower, blue is the warmest color, rushmore, the last picture show, the virgin suicides, submarine, stand by me.
  • films about running away from home to find yourself: frances ha, spirited away, moonrise kingdom, 127 hours.
  • films about transgression, nihilism, and altering reality: fight club, american psycho, donnie darko, naked, the matrix, the piano teacher, martyrs.
  • films about finding your passion: kiki’s delivery service, american beauty, reality bites, school of rock, harold and maude.
  • films about drugs and existentialism: requiem for a dream, enter the void, trainspotting, spun, fear and loathing in las vegas, the trip, christiane f. 
  • films about deconstructing the manic pixie dream girl trope: scott pilgrim vs. the world, amelie, fucking amal, paper towns, shame, annie hall.,  500 days of summer.
  • films about punk rock: sid and nancy, we are the best!, jubilee, rock n roll high school, suburbia, the runaways, rocky horror picture show, ladies and gentlemen the fabulous stains. 
  • films about lesbians: fucking amal, bound, saving face, blue is the warmest color, heavenly creatures, the kids are all right, high art
  • films about unconventional love: eternal sunshine of the spotless mind, adventureland, silver linings playbook, amelie, lars and the real girl, when harry met sally, lost in translation.
  • films about art & artists: the antics roadshow, ai weiwei: never sorry, fame high, just like being there, woodmans, who the fuck Is jackson pollock, jean-michel basquiat: the radiant child, my kid could paint that, mona lisa smile
  • films about girl best friends: thelma & louise, spring breakers, thirteen, pitch perfect, dreamgirls, mystic pizza, the last days of disco, frances ha

message me for any requests!

forbes.com
Genocide Denial Goes Viral: 'The Promise' and the IMDB

Eighty years ago the Turkish government forced Hollywood to drop a movie project based on The Forty Days of Musa Dagh, then a best-selling novel on the Armenian Genocide by German-language author, Jew and outspoken Hitler opponent Franz Werfel. The Forty Days of Musa Dagh, originally written as a warning against Hitler through the prism of the Armenian Genocide, never saw the silver screen. Such a movie could have also raised awareness of the fate of the Jews in Nazi Germany at the time and later of the ongoing Holocaust. It could have shaped the “narrative” of the struggle against Hitler. Many have since been interested to finally turn the novel into a major production, but Turkish opposition and obstruction seemed insurmountable.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/hollywood-is-losing-battle-online-trolls-992582

It had taken years — and the passionate support of Armenian activist Kirk Kerkorian, who financed the film’s $100 million budget without expecting to ever make a profit — for The Promise, a historical romance set against the backdrop of the Armenian genocide and starring Christian Bale and Oscar Isaac, to reach the screen. Producers always knew it would be controversial: Descendants of the 1.5 million Armenians killed by the Ottoman Empire shortly after the onset of World War I have long pressed for the episode to be recognized as a genocide despite the Turkish government’s insistence the deaths were not a premeditated extermination.

The Promise, which opens April 21, finally would bring the untold saga to a mass audience. But at the Toronto Film Festival premiere in September, producer Mike Medavoy watched the late billionaire’s carefully laid plans upended by a digital swarm that appeared out of nowhere.

Before the critics in attendance even had the chance to exit Roy Thompson Hall, let alone write their reviews, The Promise’s IMDb page was flooded with tens of thousands of one-star ratings. “All I know is that we were in about a 900-seat house with a real ovation at the end, and then you see almost 100,000 people who claim the movie isn’t any good,” says Medavoy. Panicked calls were placed to IMDb, but there was nothing the site could do. “One thing that they can track is where the votes come from,” says Eric Esrailian, who also produced the film, and “the vast majority of people voting were not from Canada. So I know they weren’t in Toronto.”

The online campaign against The Promise appears to have originated on sites like Incisozluk, a Turkish version of 4chan, where there were calls for users to “downvote” the film’s ratings on IMDb and YouTube. A rough translation of one post: “Guys, Hollywood is filming a big movie about the so-called Armenian genocide and the trailer has already been watched 700k times. We need to do something urgently.” Soon afterward, the user gleefully noted The Promise’s average IMDb rating had reached a dismaying 1.8 stars. “They know that the IMDb rating will stay with the film forever,” says Esrailian. “It’s a kind of censorship, really.”