christian saying

anonymous asked:

Some people say, Christianity has been forced on Blacks globally, it’s destroyed black indigenous religions, it’s been used to control Blacks (could phrase it this way: keep Blacks enslaved). Any thoughts? Love your blog!

The issue is the colonization of bodies, not the faith itself. If you do your research, Christianity was in Africa way before white people came to Africa. The issue isn’t Christianity, it’s the evil of white people using faith as a justification for racism and the degradation of people of color.

you: judeo-christian holidays
me, an intellectual: jewish and christian holidays are not the same in terms of both ritual and cultural significance and are not seen in the same way by the media or average american. grouping them together in this way implies that jews have the same narrative and power as christians, which is false and frankly offensive

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Legally Blonde the Musical
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GUYS THERES A PROSHOT BOOT REDDIT USER ZALSBURRY JUST SAVED MY LIFE HOLY FUCK

hey you know what makes me furious? all the negative portrayals of Christians in fiction media. We’re not supposed to be hateful and intolerant of every little flaw, we’re not supposed to just /say/ we’re Christians and then do things like cuss have affairs and just… s i n without caring about it. That’s how SO many people write Christians, and it’s inaccurate to how we’re supposed to act and downright infuriating.

Those who approach the New Testament solely through English translations face a serious linguistic obstacle to apprehending what these writings say about justice. In most English translations, the word ‘justice’ occurs relatively infrequently. It is no surprise, then, that most English-speaking people think the New Testament does not say much about justice; the Bibles they read do not say much about justice. English translations are in this way different from translations into Latin, French, Spanish, German, Dutch — and for all I know, most languages.


The basic issue is well known among translators and commentators. Plato’s Republic, as we all know, is about justice. The Greek noun in Plato’s text that is standardly translated as 'justice’ is 'dikaiosune;’ the adjective standardly translated as 'just’ is 'dikaios.’ This same dik-stem occurs around three hundred times in the New Testament, in a wide variety of grammatical variants.


To the person who comes to English translations of the New Testament fresh from reading and translating classical Greek, it comes as a surprise to discover that though some of those occurrences are translated with grammatical variants on our word 'just,’ the great bulk of dik-stem words are translated with grammatical variants on our word 'right.’ The noun, for example, is usually translated as 'righteousness,’ not as 'justice.’ In English, we have the word 'just’ and its grammatical variants coming from the Latin iustitia, and the word 'right’ and its grammatical variants coming from the Old English recht. Almost all our translators have decided to translate the great bulk of dik-stem words in the New Testament with grammatical variants on the latter — just the opposite of the decision made by most translators of classical Greek.


I will give just two examples of the point. The fourth of the beatitudes of Jesus, as recorded in the fifth chapter of Matthew, reads, in the New Revised Standard Version, 'Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they will be filled.’ The word translated as 'righteousness’ is 'dikaiosune.’ And the eighth beatitude, in the same translation, reads 'Blessed are those who are persecuted for righteousness’ sake, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.’ The Greek word translated as 'righteousness’ is 'dikaiosune.’ Apparently, the translators were not struck by the oddity of someone being persecuted because he is righteous. My own reading of human affairs is that righteous people are either admired or ignored, not persecuted; people who pursue justice are the ones who get in trouble.


It goes almost without saying that the meaning and connotations of 'righteousness’ are very different in present-day idiomatic English from those of 'justice.’ 'Righteousness’ names primarily if not exclusively a certain trait of personal character. … The word in present-day idiomatic English carries a negative connotation. In everyday speech one seldom any more describes someone as righteous; if one does, the suggestion is that he is self-righteous. 'Justice,’ by contrast, refers to an interpersonal situation; justice is present when persons are related to each other in a certain way.


… When one takes in hand a list of all the occurrences of dik-stem words in the Greek New Testament, and then opens up almost any English translation of the New Testament and reads in one sitting all the translations of these words, a certain pattern emerges: unless the notion of legal judgment is so prominent in the context as virtually to force a translation in terms of justice, the translators will prefer to speak of righteousness.


Why are they so reluctant to have the New Testament writers speak of primary justice? Why do they prefer that the gospel of Jesus Christ be the good news of the righteousness of God rather than the good news of the justice of God? Why do they prefer that Jesus call his followers to righteousness rather than to justice?

—  Nicholas Wolsterstorff

Something you definitely shouldn’t do is look in the tags of that very fake “the Catholic Church ruined Friday the 13th” post because it’s full of this: 

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