chris-vogel

To our elected officials and those who value America’s great outdoors:

This open letter expresses the view of more than 100 leaders of large and small businesses in the outdoor industry, which contributes more than $650 billion annually to the U.S. economy, generates $80 billion in tax revenue and employs more than 6 million people. Together, we represent a huge range of activities - from hiking to hunting and camping to conservation.

Our businesses make the lives of everyday Americans, from every corner of the political spectrum, healthier and happier. We do not often unite as an industry in the way we are today but we are compelled to make clear our collective view on a vitally important issue that affects the economic health of our industry, our local communities, and the lives of all Americans.

It is an American right to roam in our public lands. The people of the United States, today and tomorrow, share equally in the ownership of these majestic places. This powerful idea transcends party lines and sets our country apart from the rest of the world. That is why we strongly oppose any proposal, current or future, that devalues or compromises the integrity of our national public lands.

Yet as the 115th Congress begins, efforts are underway that threaten to undermine over one hundred years of public investment, stewardship and enjoyment of our national public lands. Stated simply, these efforts would be bad for the American people. They include the potential of national public lands being privatized or given to states who might sell them to the highest bidder. This would unravel courageous efforts by leaders from across the political spectrum up to the present day, including Jefferson, Lincoln and Roosevelt.

This is not a red or blue issue. It is an issue that affects our shared freedoms. Public lands should remain in public hands.

We hold these views both as leaders of the outdoor industry — which creates significant economic value for this country — and as individuals who believe deeply that the next generation should be free to benefit from our national public lands as we and our families do today.

The undersigned companies are therefore working together to ensure that all Americans maintain their right to our iconic national public lands and that it is not taken away.

Outdoor Industry Association, Amy Roberts, Executive Director

Appalachian Outfitters, Mike & Karen Leffler, Owners
Ascent Solar Technologies, Victor Lee, President & CEO
Backbone Media, Penn Newhard, Founder & Managing Partner
Backcountry, Jonathan Nielsen, CEO
Backcountry North, Tracy Mayer, Owner
Backwoods Retail, Inc., Jennifer Mull, Owner & CEO
Benchmade Knife Company, David Fee, Vice President
BioLite, Jonathan Cedar, Founder & CEO
Black Creek Outfitters, Joe & Liz Butler, Owners
Cascade Designs, David Burroughs, President
Chaco, Seth Cobb, President
Champaign Surplus, Dan & Shira Epstein, Owners
Clif Bar & Company, Kevin Cleary, CEO
Columbia Sportswear Company, Tim Boyle, President & CEO
Combat Flip Flops, Matthew Griffin, CEO
Confluence Watersports, Sue Rechner, President & CEO
Dakine, Ken Meidell, CEO
Darn Tough Vermont, Ric Cabot, President & CEO
Denali, Chris Howe, Owner
Diamond Brand Outdoors, Will Gay, Owner
Eagle Creek, Roger Spatz, President
Eastside Sports, Chris Iversen & Todd Vogel, Co-Owners
Exxel Outdoors, LLC, Harry Kazazian, CEO
Far Bank Enterprises, Travis Campbell, President & CEO
First Lite, Kenton Carruth, Co-Founder and Owner
Fishpond, John Land Le Coq, Founder & CEO
Flowfold, James Morin, Owner & COO
Goal Zero, William Harmon, General Manager
Grassroots Outdoor Alliance, Rich Hill, President
Great Outdoor Provision Co., Travis Zarins, Owner
HipCamp, Alyssa Ravasio, Founder & CEO
Ibex Outdoor Clothing, Ted Manning, CEO
Idaho Mountain Touring, Chris & Jill Haunold, Owners
JanSport, Steve Munn, President
Kammok, Haley Robison, CEO
Keen, Casey Sheahan, CEO
Kuhl, Kevin Boyle, President
La Sportiva N.A., Inc., Jonathan Lantz, President
Light Speed Outdoors, Brian Cox, CEO
Lucy, Laurie Etheridge, President
Massey’s Outfitters, Mike Massey, President
Mountain Hardwear, Dennis Randall, CMO
Mountain Khakis, Ross Saldarini, President
Mountain Safety Research (MSR), Chris Parkhurst, Vice President
Mountain Works, Inc., Jim Smith, President
My Outdoor Alphabet, Seth Neilson, CEO
Nemo, Cam Brensinger, CEO
New Balance, Rob DeMartini, President & CEO
Oru Kayak, Roberto Gutierrez, Founder & CCO
Orvis, Perk Perkins, CEO
Osprey, Layne Rigney, President
Outdoor Research, Dan Nordstrom, CEO
Outside Brands / Outside Hilton Head, Mike Overton, CEO
Pack & Paddle, John Williams, President
Pack Rat Outdoor Center, Scott & Carolyn Crook, Founders & Owners
Patagonia, Rose Marcario, President & CEO
Peak Design, Peter Dering, Founder & CEO
Piragis Northwoods Company, Steve Piragis, Owner
Packtowl, Doug Jacot, Vice President
Platypus, Doug Jacot, Vice President
Point6, Peter Duke, CEO
prAna Living, Scott Kerslake, CEO
Ramsey Outdoor, Stuart and Michael Levine, Owners
REI Co-op, Jerry Stritzke, President & CEO
Redington, Travis Campbell, President & CEO
Rio, Travis Campbell, President & CEO
River Sports Outfitters, Ed McAlister, Owner
Roads Rivers and Trails, Emily White, Co-Founder & Owner
Rock Creek Outfitters, Dawson Wheeler, Founder
Ruffwear, Patrick Kruse, R&D Director & Founder
Rutabaga Paddlesports, Darren Bush, Owner & CEO
Sage, Travis Campbell, President & CEO
SealLine, Doug Jacot, Vice President
Simms, K.C. Walsh, President & CEO
Skinny Skis, Phil Leeds & Scott O’Brien, Owners
Soar Communications, Chip Smith, President
Sorel, Mark Nenow, President
Stanley PMI, Kelly Kraus, Vice President, Stanley Brand
Summit Hut, Dana Davis, President & Co-Owner
Sunlight Sports, Wes Allen, Owner
Superfeet Worldwide, John Rauvola, CEO
Tahoe Mountain Sports, Dave Polivy, Co-Owner
Tenkara USA, Daniel Galhardo, Founder
The Base Camp, Scott Brown, Owner
The Mountaineer, Vinny McClelland, President
The North Face, Scott Baxter, Group President
The Trail Head, Todd Frank, Owner
The Toggery, Trek Stephens, President
Therm-a-Rest Brands, Doug Jacot, Vice President
Timberland, Jim Pisani, Global Brand President
Toad&Co, Gordon Seabury, CEO (& OIA board chair)
Trail Creek Outfitters, Ed Camelli & Brian Havertine, Owners
Travel Country, Mike Plante, Owner
Ute Mountaineer, Bob Wade & Maile Spung, Owners
VF Corporation, Steve Rendle, President and CEO
Weighmyrack, Allison Dennis, Founder & CEO
Western Spirit Cycling, Ashley Korenblat, CEO
Woolrich, Inc., Nick Brayton, President
Zumiez, Inc., Tom Campion, Founder & Chairman

No Air (Chris Beck x Reader)

Originally posted by barnesxparker

Prompt: Listen, I didn’t know Chris Beck was an option. Space Bucky is super hot. I need something now. If I’m messing up a prompt or it blows feel free to take creative license. How about if there’s a space walk for minor repair work (or maybe something on actual Mars, fun!) and it goes awry leading Commander Lewis to find out about me - err I mean reader and her Space Bucky - err Chris Beck? Thanks space doll.

A/N: Heads up. I am not a scientist. I do not know very much about space and the science that happens in space. I’ve read the book, that is it. So yeah. I hope you enjoy the story! Thank you to my main squeeze @kylorens-lightside for the prompt <3 

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Protect Our Public Lands: An Open Letter To America

The North Face deeply values the preservation of our public lands – not simply because they are integral to one of our country’s largest economic engines (the outdoor economy) and are an important part of our business – but because public lands are one of the most vital shared spaces of our civilization. Protecting, preserving, honoring, and embracing these lands gives people places to play, enjoy our country’s iconic beauty, and push their physical limits.

We are proud to have signed the Outdoor Industry Business Leaders Letter on Public Lands to support preserving public lands for future generations to explore, play and connect with nature.

To our elected officials and those who value America’s great outdoors:

This open letter expresses the view of more than 100 leaders of large and small businesses in the outdoor industry, which contributes more than $650 billion annually to the U.S. economy, generates $80 billion in tax revenue and employs more than 6 million people. Together, we represent a huge range of activities – from hiking to hunting and camping to conservation.

Our businesses make the lives of everyday Americans, from every corner of the political spectrum, healthier and happier. We do not often unite as an industry in the way we are today, but we are compelled to make clear our collective view on a vitally important issue that affects the economic health of our industry, our local communities, and the lives of all Americans.

It is an American right to roam in our public lands. The people of the United States, today and tomorrow, share equally in the ownership of these majestic places. This powerful idea transcends party lines and sets our country apart from the rest of the world. That is why we strongly oppose any proposal, current or future, that devalues or compromises the integrity of our national public lands.

Yet as the 115th Congress begins, efforts are underway that threaten to undermine over one hundred years of public investment, stewardship and enjoyment of our national public lands. Stated simply, these efforts would be bad for the American people. They include the potential of national public lands being privatized or given to states who might sell them to the highest bidder. This would unravel courageous efforts by leaders from across the political spectrum up to the present day, including Jefferson, Lincoln and Roosevelt.

This is not a red or blue issue. It is an issue that affects our shared freedoms. Public lands should remain in public hands.

We hold these views both as leaders of the outdoor industry — which creates significant economic value for this country — and as individuals who believe deeply that the next generation should be free to benefit from our national public lands as we and our families do today.

The undersigned companies are therefore working together to ensure that all Americans maintain their right to our iconic national public lands and that it is not taken away.

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Man, was this fucked up. [johanbeck]

The Martian, Chris Beck/Beth Johanssen
Warning: not gonna make much sense if you saw the movie without reading the book.
Synopsis: A little more context for the book’s darkest moment.


Beth couldn’t get inside her quarters quickly enough.

She shut the door and leaned back against it just as she lost her ability to stifle back her tears any longer. With shaking hands, she covered her face and tried to listen to the voice in her head demanding that she keep it together.

Suddenly, the door moved behind her. Startled, she jumped out of the way and watched Chris’s head poke through the opening. Her wide-eyed expression was probably one of shock–they’d never dared to enter each other’s rooms during the regular hours of the day before–but something about the look on his face told her that secrecy was his last concern.

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let’s groove tonight

The Martian
Rich Purnell, Melissa Lewis, Beth Johanssen, Rick Martinez, Alex Vogel, Chris Beck
The Ares 3 crew, while Watney is still recovering, takes an unsuspecting Rich Purnell out for a drink to celebrate his Manoeuvre.

“PURNELL, WE KNOW YOU’RE IN THERE.”

Rich lifts his head off his pillow, blinking blearily in the artificial computer light that bathes his room, having been rudely awoken by the loud and insistent banging on his door that preceded the yelled summons. He blinks a few more times, clearing the sticky feeling from his eyes – what time did he fall asleep? He doesn’t know – and forces himself to a sitting position with a groan, the duvet pooling at his feet. He yawns, sleepily rubbing the back of his neck, and flinches when the banging starts again.

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the EVA drama fic we all wanted. that’s it, that’s the title. [johanbeck]

The Martian: Chris Beck/Beth Johanssen
Setting: Post-Watney rescue, sometime in the middle of the trip back to Earth. 
Scientific accuracy: Completely up for debate.


Here’s the thing about EVAs.

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the martian was a really good film and i really enjoyed it, but i was kinda thinking, from a storytelling perspective, what if the romance hadn’t been between chris and beth, but instead had been between chris and mark?

  • like i’m not sure whether it would be a secret relationship or whether they’d both be into each other and know that they were into each other but can’t act upon it because they’re on a mission and it’s not allowed and shit
  • but either way the crew wouldn’t openly know about it (although some might have their suspicions), and chris would have to keep it a secret from them, even after thinking that mark had died
  • like, imagine, the opening scene with the whole crew being all team-y and happy before the storm hits. everyone’s bantering, including chris and mark, and you get a couple of shots that show them exchanging smiles in a way that’s just between them, which at this point the audience would probably assume is because they’re good friends
  • then the storm hits and mark is taken out by the debris, but instead of everyone agreeing that they need to leave, you have chris resisting, saying they should wait just a bit longer, that they need to find mark, even though he knows that mark is probably dead. 
  • lewis overrules him eventually, and in this version she’s much more commanding about leaving without mark, so it’s her making the decision to leave as chris begs her to wait a little longer, rather than her wanting to wait while the team begs her to leave. and it’d be clearer that they only just escaped in time, so that it’s clear that lewis made the right decision, and that she honestly couldn’t have saved mark and shouldn’t feel guilty for it.
  • nothing much would change on mark’s end as he tries to survive on mars, but on the ship you’d get a scene in which chris is visibly distraught, but trying to hide it a bit, seemingly trying to be strong. it’d be at the start of a scene in which something more important happens, so it’s just a hint he’s not okay rather than being the point of the scene - beth asking if he’s okay and chris obviously lying about it, or him being a less functional team member than usual because of his grief. something that can still be passed off as him losing his best friend, because he was the closest person to mark. 
  • and then we get the scene where nasa tell them that mark’s alive, and there’s still the rest of the crew’s relief, and maybe still lewis’s guilt, but there’s an extra moment or two paid to chris’s reaction of utter shock. 
  • and when the crew eventually talk to mark, it’s still martinez who does the conversation because they still have that jokey, good-friends thing going on, but chris is pacing worriedly in the background, and there’s more focus on his reaction to the conversation. and martinez even asks chris if he wants to take over the chat but chris just shakes his head, because he doesn’t trust himself to keep it together and he wouldn’t know what to say anyway. 
  • but during the chat mark asks after him. not in an obvious way. in a subtle, joking way. in the same way that he’d say “tell commander lewis her music sucks”. he’d say, “tell chris that his ebooks are all terrible. he has no taste.” and the screen jumps to a shot of chris looking emotional and conflicted before forcing a smile and saying to martinez, “ask mark if it’s because he’s used to books with pictures.” and the scene ends with mark reading that message and smiling. 
  • and when lewis holds the meeting about going back for mark, chris doesn’t seem like he’s a little on the fence about it. instead of saying “if we go back for mark” he says “when we go back for mark”, like it’s a given. no one even expects his vote to be anything but a yes. and he sits in his chair giving the rest of the crew almost challenging looks, as if to say “I dare you to vote against going back for him”. no one does, although it’s not because of chris. but it’s clear that chris is the person most firmly in the “we have to go back for him” camp. 
  • when lewis gives out assignments for retrieving mark, everything is the same, except when she tells chris that he’s the one catching mark, she gives his mission statement a little more attention. 
  • “can you handle this?” she asks him seriously. it’s not insulting or insinuating, it’s a genuine concern. “because if you can’t, if your head isn’t in the right place, you need to tell me, so that i can do it instead.” 
  • chris lifts his chin in affronted response. “of course i can handle it,” he replies. “i’m the expert. i’m the most qualified. i’ll get him.”
  • “no one is doubting that,” lewis replies. “just make sure you remember that there’s still a chance this won’t work. i don’t want this mission to go wrong any more than you do, and I’ll do everything in my power make this rescue a success, but i need to know that if i give the order, you’ll pull back. i need you to tell me that you can do that.” 
  • chris gives her that rebellious look for a moment, before dropping his eyes. “yes commander,” he agrees. 
  • they take their places. in light of their closer relationship, the risks chris takes getting from one airlock to another has an added weight of desperation to his actions. eventually, he positions himself and gets ready to catch mark. 
  • this time, captain lewis isn’t the one to retrieve mark (because why would she? she’s the captain. chris is the expert). there’s no one to reel chris in because vogel had to deal with the dynamite, but luckily the tether can be operated manually. 
  • this time, chris is the one who argues with mark when mark wants to use air to propel himself towards chris. “i can get him,” he desperately tells the captain, terrified that mark will propel himself further out of reach. they’re so close to him. he can’t come this close to mark just to lose him again. 
  • but mark punches a hole in his suit anyway and the audience watch with baited breath as chris tries desperately to grab mark, as their hands slip away from each other and mark desperately tries to grab the tether.
  • mark manages it, and chris literally propels himself into mark trying to get a proper grasp on him. their hands meet, clasped firm this time, and both the crew and the audience breathe a sigh of relief. the music turns goes from suspense to victory
  • chris maneuvers them back into the airlock, and the music quietens while the chamber decompresses. they’re breathing heavily from exertion and adrenaline. 
  • both astronauts take off their helmets and strip off their suits. 
  • but the scene isn’t over yet. there’s a palpable awkwardness between the two of them that doesn’t quite make sense. they celebratory music fades into silence.
  • mark is the one who breaks it. “i can’t believe it.” he jokes. “i haven’t seen single person in four hundred days and i’m greeted with your ugly face.” 
  • chris is visibly overcome with emotion when he responds. “tell me about it. i thought i’d finally gotten rid of you,” he says. he’s choking back tears. 
  • there’s a beat, and the tension breaks. both men embrace each other, smiling through their tears.
  • “you have no idea how good it feels to be able to touch another human being,” mark mutters as they hug.
  • “i have some idea,” chris replies, pulling away. “i thought i might never see you again.” 
  • they’re standing so close, at eye level with one another. lewis’s voice come through the coms. “beck, watney, status report.” 
  • neither of them look away. 
  • slowly, inevitably, they lean in. their lips meet. it’s the kiss of two people who thought that they’d never kiss again, and still can’t quite believe that they are. 
  • “beck, watney, do you read me?” 
  • they respond to their commander’s voice this time, pulling away from each other. both are smiling at each other. “we read you, commander,” beck replies into his com. “we’re both safe and sound. we’re coming to you now.” 
  • the scene jumps to chris and mark rejoining the rest of the team. they’re all waiting, and only lewis remains at her station as the rest of the crew flock to him, rushing to embrace him and welcome him back. chris stands to the side, smiling at the scene. he’s already had his reunion.
  • mark looks up and meets lewis’s eyes. he gives her a small salute with his free hand. she gives him a short nod in return, her relief and happiness visible on her face. she’s done it. she’s saved him, against all odds. her guilt at leaving him behind, as irrational as it was, has been assuaged.
  • and in this ending, in the summing up scene, beth is the one who’s preparing for launch. this time, martinez is shown playing with his son. he still longs for space, and he’ll go back someday, but for now there are other important things he has to do.  
  • and mark’s scene doesn’t open with him sitting on a bench. instead, he’s making breakfast in the kitchen of a modern apartment while chris hunts for papers, running late for a meeting. “If i don’t have those reports, mcgregor will have my head,” he tells mark frantically. 
  • “i’m glad i’m not in your shoes. an angry mcgregor.” mark shudders dramatically. “abandon me on mars again any day. are these your papers?” he pulls a file off a nearby shelf. 
  • “you’re amazing,” chris says, giving him a quick kiss. “i’ve got to run. i’ll see you tonight. it’s my turn to cook dinner.” 
  • “what are we having, chef?” mark asks with a cheeky smile as chris opens the door to leave. 
  • “i was thinking something with potatoes,” chris replies without missing a beat. he lingers long enough just to witness mark’s horrified expression before shutting the door with a snap, before fading into mark’s final scene as he introduces himself to his new class.