cholerae

The Mayans had mastered water pressure and had fountains and toilets as early as 750 AD.
Aztecs had running water and sewage.

The Victorians In the mid-1800s were dying of cholera because they just dumped their raw shit in the river Thames. They wouldn’t shower for months at a time because they were afraid of the polluted water.

How many have you read?

The BBC estimates that most people will only read 6 books out of the 100 listed below. Reblog this and bold the titles you’ve read.

1 Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen
2 Lord of the Rings - J. R. R. Tolkein
3 Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte
4 Harry Potter series
5 To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee
6 The Bible
7 Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte
8 Nineteen Eighty Four – George Orwell
9 His Dark Materials – Philip Pullman
10 Great Expectations – Charles Dickens
11 Little Women – Louisa M Alcott
12 Tess of the D’Urbervilles – Thomas Hardy
13 Catch 22 – Joseph Heller
14 Complete Works of Shakespeare
15 Rebecca – Daphne Du Maurier
16 The Hobbit – JRR Tolkien
17 Birdsong – Sebastian Faulks
18 Catcher in the Rye
19 The Time Traveller’s Wife - Audrey Niffeneger
20 Middlemarch – George Eliot
21 Gone With The Wind – Margaret Mitchell
22 The Great Gatsby – F Scott Fitzgerald
23 Bleak House – Charles Dickens
24 War and Peace – Leo Tolstoy
25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – Douglas Adams
26 Brideshead Revisited – Evelyn Waugh
27 Crime and Punishment – Fyodor Dostoyevsky
28 Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck
29 Alice in Wonderland – Lewis Carroll
30 The Wind in the Willows – Kenneth Grahame
31 Anna Karenina – Leo Tolstoy
32 David Copperfield – Charles Dickens
33 Chronicles of Narnia – CS Lewis
34 Emma – Jane Austen
35 Persuasion – Jane Austen
36 The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe – CS Lewis
37 The Kite Runner - Khaled Hosseini
38 Captain Corelli’s Mandolin - Louis De Bernieres
39 Memoirs of a Geisha – Arthur Golden
40 Winnie the Pooh – AA Milne
41 Animal Farm – George Orwell
42 The Da Vinci Code – Dan Brown
43 One Hundred Years of Solitude – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
44 A Prayer for Owen Meaney – John Irving
45 The Woman in White – Wilkie Collins
46 Anne of Green Gables – LM Montgomery
47 Far From The Madding Crowd – Thomas Hardy
48 The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
49 Lord of the Flies – William Golding
50 Atonement – Ian McEwan

51 Life of Pi – Yann Martel
52 Dune – Frank Herbert
53 Cold Comfort Farm – Stella Gibbons
54 Sense and Sensibility – Jane Austen
55 A Suitable Boy – Vikram Seth
56 The Shadow of the Wind – Carlos Ruiz Zafon
57 A Tale Of Two Cities – Charles Dickens
58 Brave New World – Aldous Huxley
59 The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time – Mark Haddon
60 Love In The Time Of Cholera – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
61 Of Mice and Men – John Steinbeck
62 Lolita – Vladimir Nabokov
63 The Secret History – Donna Tartt
64 The Lovely Bones - Alice Sebold
65 Count of Monte Cristo – Alexandre Dumas
66 On The Road – Jack Kerouac
67 Jude the Obscure – Thomas Hardy
68 Bridget Jones’s Diary – Helen Fielding
69 Midnight’s Children – Salman Rushdie
70 Moby Dick – Herman Melville
71 Oliver Twist – Charles Dickens
72 Dracula – Bram Stoker
73 The Secret Garden – Frances Hodgson Burnett
74 Notes From A Small Island – Bill Bryson
75 Ulysses – James Joyce
76 The Bell Jar – Sylvia Plath
77 Swallows and Amazons - Arthur Ransome
78 Germinal – Emile Zola
79 Vanity Fair – William Makepeace Thackeray
80 Possession – AS Byatt
81 A Christmas Carol – Charles Dickens
82 Cloud Atlas – David Mitchel
83 The Color Purple – Alice Walker
84 The Remains of the Day – Kazuo Ishiguro
85 Madame Bovary – Gustave Flaubert
86 A Fine Balance – Rohinton Mistry
87 Charlotte’s Web – EB White
88 The Five People You Meet In Heaven – Mitch Albom
89 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes – Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
90 The Faraway Tree Collection – Enid Blyton
91 Heart of Darkness – Joseph Conrad
92 The Little Prince – Antoine De Saint-Exupery
93 The Wasp Factory – Iain Banks
94 Watership Down – Richard Adams
95 A Confederacy of Dunces – John Kennedy Toole
96 A Town Like Alice – Nevil Shute
97 The Three Musketeers – Alexandre Dumas
98 Hamlet – William Shakespeare
99 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – Roald Dahl
100 Les Miserables – Victor Hugo

okay @ all of france i really really REALLY need you to go vote in the second round, PLEASE.

if you don’t want le pen to win, vote for macron. it’s that easy.

no “she’ll never win anyway”. that’s how brexit happened.  

no “but he’s not great either”, that’s how trump got elected.

no “I’m abstaining because i want to send a message”, that’s just plain stupid and i hope i don’t have to explain why oh my god. PLEASE.


If Le Pen wins, the EU is finished. Yes I’m german and I’m openly admitting that without France, we can’t do it. 
If she manages to win the election she’ll also be able to get France to leave the EU, and that will be a desaster for everyone involved.
Look up how absolutely fantastic the Brexit negotiations are going if you’re still on the fence about that.


It’s a very similar situation to the one the US was in last year.
One 
“ugh a boring politician they’re not exciting and has ties to the big banks and voting for them won’t change anything god i hate the system”
candidate
versus one 
oh look a charismatic fascist who will probably literally kill us all and throw the country, if not the continent, into utter chaos” candidate.

please think twice before you say it’s a choice between two evils. it’s not pest oder cholera, at the very worst it’s a stubbed toe versus lung cancer, and the lung cancer’s best chances lie in people not voting at all.

Writers with your Venus Sign.

• Aries Venus: “There is no greater glory than to die for love.” - Gabriel García Márquez , Love in the Time of Cholera.

• Taurus Venus: “To be together again, after so long, who love the sunny wind, the windy sun, in the sun, in the wind, that is perhaps something, perhaps something.”- Samuel Beckett, Watt.

• Gemini Venus: “In black ink my love may still shine bright.”- William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets.

• Cancer Venus: “The most painful thing is losing yourself in the process of loving someone too much, and forgetting that you are special too.”- Ernest Hemingway, Men Without Women.

• Leo Venus: “Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly.”- Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace.

• Virgo Venus: “My heart is wax molded as she pleases, but enduring as marble to retain.”- Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, La Gitanilla El Amante Liberal (Novelas Ejemplares, Obra Completa 6).

• Libra Venus: “The very essence of romance is uncertainty.”- Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest and Other Plays.

• Scorpio Venus: “The more I know of the world, the more I am convinced that I shall never see a man whom I can really love. I require so much!”- Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility.

• Sagittarius Venus: “I am the Cat who walks by himself, and all places are alike to me.”- Rudyard Kipling, The Cat That Walked by Himself: And Other Stories.

• Capricorn Venus: “What is hell? I maintain that it is the suffering of being unable to love.”- Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Brothers Karamazov.

• Aquarius Venus: “To be left alone is the most precious thing one can ask of the modern world.”- Anthony Burgess, Homage To Qwert Yuiop: Essays.

• Pisces Venus: “Years of love have been forgot, In the hatred of a minute.”-Edgar Allan Poe, The Complete Stories and Poems.

Depresja : dzisiaj będziesz myślała, że nic nie ma sensu
od Twojego związku do życia

Anoreksja: jesteś za gruba, żeby zjeść cokolwiek a co dopiero te ohydne, kaloryczne słodycze

Nerwica: wszystko Cię tak bardzo wyprowadza z równowagi

Bulimia: chyba zapomniałaś wyrzygać tego czego jeszcze nawet nie zjadłaś, prawda?

Schizofrenia: ej widzisz to? przerażające prawda? dodam do tego jeszcze jakiejś bardzo głośne dźwięki, których naprawdę nie ma

Zaburzenia tożsamości: kim Ty w końcu jesteś?

Autoagresja: blizn już prawie nie widać… mogłabyś zrobić nowe

Paranoja: ktoś tu jest! czujesz to, prawda? tu ktos jest i nas obserwuje! jest nawet za nami!

Hipolibidemia: pocałunki? przytulaski? seks?! przecież to jest obrzydliwe! nigdy tego nawet nie doświadczysz

Amnezja: dobre wspomnienia? cholera… nie pamiętasz…

Niska samoocena: dzisiaj z resztą jak zwykle wyglądasz okropnie, powinnaś wyglądać lepiej, jak Twoje koleżanki

Nagły przypływ wspomnieniowy : pamiętasz jak Cię bił? jak było nam nie dobrze? bez powodu. a pamiętasz tego chłopaka ?

Alkoholizm: patrz, wódka… jaka ona musi być dobra, spróbujmy !


Uzależnienie od tytoniu: tylko 20 złoty… lepsze to niż jakiejś pierdoły…

—  moje

A handy list of poisons for writing reference, provided to you by me, Bella

Poisoning is one of the oldest murder tactics in the books. It was the old equalizer, and while it’s often associated with women, historically men are no less likely to poison you. This is not a guide on how to poison people, you banana bunches, it’s a guide on writing about poisons in fiction so you don’t end up on a watch list while researching them. I’ve taken that hit for you. You’re welcome. These are just a few of the more classic ones.

  • Hemlock: Hemlock (conium maculatum) is one of the more famous ones, used in ancient times most notably in Socrates’ forced suicide execution. So it goes. The plant has bunches of small, white flowers, and can grow up to ten feet tall. It’s a rather panicky way to die, although it wouldn’t show: hemlock is a paralytic, so the cause of death is most often asphyxiation due to respiratory paralysis, although the mind remains unaffected and aware.
  • Belladonna: Atropa belladonna is also called deadly nightshade. It has pretty, trumpet-shaped purple flowers and dark, shiny berries that actually look really delicious which is ironic since it’s the most toxic part of the plant. The entire plant is poisonous, mind you, but the berries are the most. One of the most potent poisons in its hemisphere, it was used as a beauty treatment, so the story says, and rubbed into the eyes to make the eyes dilate and the cheeks flush. Hench the name beautiful lady. The death is more lethargic than hemlock, although its symptoms are worse: dilated pupils, sensitivity to light, blurred vision, tachycardia, loss of balance, staggering, headache, rash, flushing, severely dry mouth and throat, slurred speech, urinary retention, constipation, confusion, hallucinations, delirium, and convulsions. It’s toxic to animals, but cattle and rabbits can eat it just fine, for some reason. 
  • Arsenic: Arsenic comes from a metalloid and not a plant, unlike the others here, but it’s easily the most famous and is still used today. Instead of being distilled from a plant, chunks of arsenic are dug up or mined. It was once used as a treatment for STDs, and also for pest control and blacksmithing, which was how many poisoners got access to it. It was popular in the middle ages because it looked like a cholera death, due to acute symptoms including stomach cramps, diarrhea, confusion, convulsions, vomiting, and death. Slow poisoning looked more like a heart attack. The Italians famously claimed that a little arsenic improved the taste of wine.
  • Strychnine: Strychnine (strick-nine) is made from the seed of strychnos nux vomica and causes poisoning which results in muscular convulsions and eventually death through asphyxia. Convulsions appear after inhalation or injection—very quickly, within minutes—and take somewhat longer to manifest after ingestion, around approximately 15 minutes. With a very high dose, brain death can occur in 15 to 30 minutes. If a lower dose is ingested, other symptoms begin to develop, including seizures, cramping, stiffness, hypervigilance, and agitation. Seizures caused by strychnine poisoning can start as early as 15 minutes after exposure and last 12 – 24 hours. They are often triggered by sights, sounds, or touch and can cause other adverse symptoms, including overheating, kidney failure, metabolic and respiratory acidosis. During seizures, abnormal dilation, protrusion of the eyes, and involuntary eye movements may occur. It is also slightly hallucinogenic and is sometimes used to cut narcotics. It also notably has no antidote. In low doses, some use it as a performance enhancer.
  • Curare: Chondrodendron tomentosum is lesser known than its famous cousins, but kills in a very similar way to hemlock. It is slow and terrible, as the victim is aware and the heart may beat for many minutes after the rest of the body is paralyzed. If artificial respiration is given until the poison subsides, the victim will survive.
  • WolfsbaneAconitum has several names; Monkshood, aconite, Queen of Poisons, women’s bane, devil’s helmet) and is a pretty, purple plant with gourd-shaped flowers. The root is the most potent for distillation. Marked symptoms may appear almost immediately, usually not later than one hour, and with large doses death is near instantaneous. Death usually occurs within two to six hours in fatal poisoning. The initial signs are gastrointestinal including nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. This is followed by a sensation of burning, tingling, and numbness in the mouth and face, and of burning in the abdomen. In severe poisonings pronounced motor weakness occurs and sensations of tingling and numbness spread to the limbs. The plant should be handled with gloves, as the poison can seep into the skin.
  • FoxgloveDigitalis is large with trumpet-shaped flowers that can be many colors, but usually a pinkish shade. It may have from the term foxes-glew, which translated to fairy music. Intoxication causes nausea, vomiting and diarrhea, as well as sometimes resulting in xanthopsia (jaundiced or yellow vision) and the appearance of blurred outlines (halos), drooling, abnormal heart rate, cardiac arrhythmias, weakness, collapse, dilated pupils, tremors, seizures, and even death. Slowed heartbeat also occurs. Because a frequent side effect of digitalis is reduction of appetite and the mortality rate is low, some individuals have used the drug as a weight-loss aid. It looks a bit like comfrey, which is an aid for inflammation. Make sure not to confuse the two.