chloe-mccarthy

9

“There was a time when I experienced architecture without thinking about it. Sometimes I can almost feel a particular door handle in my hand, a piece of metal shaped like the back of a spoon. I used to take hold of it when I went into my aunt’s garden. That door handle still seems to me like a special sign of entry into a world of different moods and smells. I remember the sound of the gravel under my feet, the soft gleam of the waxed oak staircase, I can hear the heavy front door closing behind me as I walk along the dark corridor and enter the kitchen, the only really brightly lit room in the house.” - Peter Zumthor

6

The Schaffer Residence, 1949 by American architect John Lautner. Hidden in a wooded valley at the foot of the Verdugo Mountains, the redwood, concrete and glass residence opens to the oak forest that influenced the form and orientation of the design. The property was used as the home of the title character in Tom Ford’s ‘A Single Man’.

6

Donald Judd’s 101 Spring Street, New York
“Art and architecture—all the arts—do not have to exist in isolation, as they do now. This fault is very much a key to the present society. Architecture is nearly gone, but it, art, all the arts, in fact all parts of society, have to be rejoined, and joined more than they have ever been.” – Donald Judd, 1986 

10

Pale bricks are arranged in a herringbone pattern on the outer walls of this home in north-east London that architect Zoe Chan designed and built for herself. The Atelier ChanChan principal wanted the house to relate to the Victorian terraces that characterise London’s housing stock but to also have its own character, so she chose a steel frame infilled with a non-load-bearing herringbone brickwork, instead of the typical English and Flemish brick bonds. Photo: Mike Tsang.

6

Ravensburg Art Museum by Lederer Ragnarsdóttir Oei. Set in the medieval town of Ravensburg, Germany, the bricks used to construct this contemporary art museum were salvaged from a demolished 14th-century cloister near the Belgian border. As a result, the building blends in naturally with the cityscape that has developed over centuries.

9

‘Vega Cottage’ by Kolman Boyle Architects. The foundations of this timber cabin are integrated perfectly into the craggy shoreline of the Norwegian island of Vega. The design was inspired by the fisherman’s boathouses that line the island’s shore.