chiune-sugihara

Chiune Sugihara, saved 6000 Jew’s lives. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas to Jews. He hand-wrote them 18 hours a day. The day his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witness claim he was still writing visas and throwing from the train as he pulled away.The world didn’t know what he’d done until Israel honored him in 1985, the year before he died.   (source)

I cannot allow these people to die, people who have come to me for help with death staring them in the eyes. Whatever punishment may be imposed on me, I know I should follow my conscience.
— 

Chiune Sugihara.

Japanese Diplomat in Lithuania during World War 2 who saved hundreds of lives by signing as many travel visas for Jews as he could, risking his career and life in the process.

Japan PM hails Holocaust hero Chiune Sugihara

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe visited Washington’s Holocaust Memorial on Monday to hail a rare hero of Japan’s brutal World War II past.

Previously, Abe has faced criticism for his allegedly revisionist views of Japan’s own war-time behavior.

But, on the eve of a White House meeting with President Barack Obama, Abe solemnly marked the genocide while hailing Japanese envoy Chiune Sugihara, who helped Jews flee Nazi-occupied Europe.

Sugihara was Japan’s Imperial Consul in Lithuania, where he issued at least 2,000 visas allowing Jews to flee Nazi pogroms between 1939 and 1940.

“As a Japanese citizen I feel extremely proud of Mr Sugihara’s achievement,” Abe said as he toured the memorial.

“The courageous action by this single man saved thousands of lives.”
As he visited the Holocaust Memorial Museum 70 years after the end of World War II and the liberation of Auschwitz, Abe said “my heart is filled with a solemn feeling.”

“Never again,” he added.

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Toshiaki Karasawa will star in a 2015 movie based on the life of diplomat Chiune Sugihara.

Sugihara is known for having issued thousands of transit visas to Jewish refugees while he was the Vice-Consul for the Empire of Japan in Kaunas, Lithuania during World War II. He did this without the permission of his superiors, putting himself and his family at risk to rescue others.

Additional co-stars include Koyuki as Sugihara’s wife Yukiko, Borys Szyc as Sugihara’s right-hand man, Agnieszka Grochowska as a woman named Irina, Gaku Hamada, Takashi Tsukamoto, Kenichi Takito, and Fumiyo Kohinata.

Eastern Orthodox icon of Chiune Sugihara

wikipedia:

Chiune Sugihara (杉原 千畝 Sugihara Chiune?, 1 January 1900 – 31 July 1986) was a Japanese diplomat who served as Vice-Consul for the Empire of Japan in Lithuania. During World War II, he helped several thousand Jews leave the country by issuing transit visas to Jewish refugees so that they could travel to Japan. Most of the Jews who escaped were refugees from German-occupied Poland and residents of Lithuania. Sugihara wrote travel visas that facilitated the escape of more than 6,000 Jewish refugees to Japanese territory, risking his career and his family’s lives. Sugihara had told the refugees to call him “Sempo”, the Sino-Japanese reading of the characters in his first name, discovering it was much easier for Western people to pronounce. In 1985, Israel honored him as Righteous Among the Nations for his actions.

[…]

Though still not officially canonized, he is considered a saint by some Eastern Orthodox Christians.

via solipsistic-tendencies

杉原 千畝 (Sugihara Chiune)

Chiune Sugihara was a Japanese diplomat who served as vice-consul for the Japanese Empire in Lithuania. During World War II, he helped several thousand Jews leave the country by issuing transit visas to Jewish refugees so that they could travel to Japan. He wrote travel visas that facilitated the escape of more than 6,000 Jewish refugees to Japanese territory, risking his career and his family’s lives.


Chiune Sugihara. This man saved 6000 Jews. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas to Jews. He hand-wrote them 18 hrs a day. The day his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witnesses claim he was STILL writing visas and throwing from the train as he pulled away. He saved 6000 lives. The world didn’t know what he’d done until Israel honored him in 1985, the year before he died.

Chiune Sugihara was a Japanese diplomat credited with saving the lives of several thousand Jews during the Holocaust. Defying the Japanese government, he issued thousands of visas to refugees illegally, hand-writing them for hours each day. Even when he was forced to leave due to the closing of the consulate in Lithuania, Sugihara threw visas out the window of his exiting train.

In Sugihara’s own words:

You want to know about my motivation, don’t you? Well. It is the kind of sentiments anyone would have when he actually sees refugees face to face, begging with tears in their eyes. He just cannot help but sympathize with them. Among the refugees were the elderly and women. They were so desperate that they went so far as to kiss my shoes, Yes, I actually witnessed such scenes with my own eyes. Also, I felt at that time, that the Japanese government did not have any uniform opinion in Tokyo. Some Japanese military leaders were just scared because of the pressure from the Nazis; while other officials in the Home Ministry were simply ambivalent. People in Tokyo were not united. I felt it silly to deal with them. So, I made up my mind not to wait for their reply. I knew that somebody would surely complain about me in the future. But, I myself thought this would be the right thing to do. There is nothing wrong in saving many people’s lives….The spirit of humanity, philanthropy…neighborly friendship…with this spirit, I ventured to do what I did, confronting this most difficult situation—and because of this reason, I went ahead with redoubled courage.

huffingtonpost.com
Chiune Sugihara, Japan Diplomat Who Saved 6,000 Jews During Holocaust, Remembered

Excerpt:

Most Americans know of Oskar Schindler, the German businessman who saved more than 1,200 lives during the Holocaust by hiring Jews to work in his factories and fought Nazi efforts to remove them.

But fewer know about Chiune Sugihara, the Japanese diplomat who disobeyed his government’s orders and issued visas that allowed 6,000 Jews to escape from Nazi-occupied territories via Japan.

On Sunday, as Holocaust survivors and descendants of survivors observe International Holocaust Remembrance Day, a growing and widespread community of Jews – linked by their gratitude toward Sugihara for saving them or family members – remembers a man once forgotten.

Chiune Sugihara was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas for Jews on the run. He hand-wrote them 18 hours each day. When his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witnesses claim he continued to write visas, throwing from a moving train as it pulled away. He saved 6000 lives. The world didn’t know of his heroism until Israel honored him in 1985, the year before he died.

Chiune Sugihara (January 1, 1900 - July 31, 1986)

Chiune Sugihara was a Japanese diplomat who served as Vice-Consul for the Japanese Empire in Lithuania. In WWII, he helped several thousand Jews leave the country by issuing transit visas to Jewish refugees so that they could travel to Japan. Most of the Jews who escaped were refugees from German-occupied Poland or residents of Lithuania. Sugihara wrote travel visas that facilitated the escape of more than 6,000 Jewish refugees to Japanese territory, risking his career and his family’s lives. In 1985, Israel honored him as Righteous Among the Nations for his actions.  (From Wikipedia article on Chiune Sugihara)

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A banner with the words “Never Again” appears on the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. Today, Secretary Tillerson issued the following statement commemorating #HolocaustRemembranceDay:

Today on Yom HaShoah – Holocaust Remembrance Day, marking the anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising – we honor the six million Jews systematically murdered by the Nazis and their collaborators. We also remember all individuals targeted for persecution and death by the Nazis. This year, the State Department hosted an event, along with the Embassies of Lithuania, Japan, and Israel, to honor the memory of Chiune Sugihara, Japanese Consul to Lithuania in 1939-40. Consul Sugihara saved the lives of some 6,000 Jews and others by providing them with transit visas to Japan.  

Leo Melamed, a child survivor saved by Consul Sugihara, reminded us during the event that Sugihara knew instinctively that to save lives was “the right thing to do.” Tens of thousands of Jews and others are alive today because Consul Sugihara followed that simple yet incredibly courageous dictum. We are blessed that Holocaust survivors continue to inspire us with their first-hand experiences and to steel our resolve to combat antisemitism and all forms of hatred.

Great story of a righteous man: Chiune Sugihara, who saved 6,000 Jews from the Holocaust. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas to Jews.

He hand-wrote them 18 hrs a day. The day his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witnesses claim he was STILL writing visas and throwing from the train as he pulled away. He saved 6000 lives.

The world didn’t know what he’d done until Israel honored him in 1985, the year before he died.

Chiune Sugihara

Chiune Sugihara (1900 – 1986) fue un diplomático japonés que ejerció de vicecónsul del Imperio del Japón en Lituania. Durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial ayudó a alrededor de 6000 judíos a dejar dicho país y la Polonia ocupada por la Alemania Nazi y por la Unión Soviética mediante la expendición de visados de tránsito para que pudieran viajar a territorio japonés, hecho por el que puso en peligro su carrera y la vida de su familia.

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He became known as “The Japanese Schindler.”

Chiune Sugihara, the Japanese diplomat in Lithuania during WW2. He risked his life and his livelihood to save over 6000 Jews.

For 29 days, from July 31 to August 28, 1940, he sat for endless hours creating the visas that meant life. Hour after hour, day after day, he wrote and signed - 300 visas a day – all written entirely by hand. He did not even stop for meals. His wife Yukiko left him sandwiches by his side. At the end of the day, she would massage his aching hands.

“We will never forget you" were the last words he heard from the refugees.

And the world did not forget him. In 1985, Israel honoured him with the title of “Righteous Among The Nations.” Today, he is known as “The Japanese Schindler.”

You want to know about my motivation, don’t you? Well. It is the kind of sentiments anyone would have when he actually sees refugees face to face, begging with tears in their eyes. He just cannot help but sympathize with them. Among the refugees were the elderly and women. They were so desperate that they went so far as to kiss my shoes, Yes, I actually witnessed such scenes with my own eyes. Also, I felt at that time, that the Japanese government did not have any uniform opinion in Tokyo. Some Japanese military leaders were just scared because of the pressure from the Nazis; while other officials in the Home Ministry were simply ambivalent. People in Tokyo were not united. I felt it silly to deal with them. So, I made up my mind not to wait for their reply. I knew that somebody would surely complain about me in the future. But, I myself thought this would be the right thing to do. There is nothing wrong in saving many people’s lives….The spirit of humanity, philanthropy…neighborly friendship…with this spirit, I ventured to do what I did, confronting this most difficult situation—-and because of this reason, I went ahead with redoubled courage.
—  Chiune Sugihara