chinese waiter

Let's go to a restaurant : 我们一起去餐馆吧。(Wǒmen yīqǐ qù cānguǎn ba)

When you enter in the restaurant , you’ll often hear :

你们几位? (nǐ men jǐ wèi) : How many people (are in your group?) or simply 几位?(jǐ wèi)

You might respond : 

Two: 两位 (liǎng wèi)
Three: 三位 (sān wèi)
Four: 四位 (sì wèi) etc…


What you might hear (too) :

您要点菜吗?:(nín yào diǎncài ma?) Would you like to order?

您要点什么?:(nín yào diǎn shénme?) What would you like to order?

您已经选好了吗?:(nín yǐjīng xuǎnhǎole ma?) Have you chosen already?

您要先喝点儿什么吗?:(nín yào xiān hēdiǎnr shénme ma?) Would you like to order some drinks to start with?

马上! (mǎ shàng): Be right there!


Getting the Waiter’s attention

In a Western restaurant, we may politely say something like, “Excuse me. We’re ready to order.” Not so in a Chinese restaurant. 

Waiter! Order food! : 服务员! 点菜! (fú wù yuán! diǎn cài!) 

Instead of 服务员, depending of the place (Hong Kong, Singapore, Taiwan…) we can use 小姐 (xiǎo jiě) for waitress. 


Making your order : 

I want… :我要… (wǒ yào) or I would like: 我想要 (wǒ xiăng yào)

Examples : 

  • I’d like an order of Kung Pao chicken : 我要一份宫保鸡丁 (wǒ yào yí fèn gōng bǎo jī dīng) 
  • I want a bowl of rice : 我要一碗饭  (wǒ yào yì wǎn fàn)

Do you have chicken ?: 请问,有鸡肉吗?

Is this beef ?: 这是牛肉吗?

(While pointing to the menu) : 这个, 一份 (zhè gè, yī fèn) (One serving of this.)

I want a bottle of Coke: 我要一瓶可口可乐 (Wǒ yào yī píng kěkǒukělè)

Asking questions : 

Waitress/ waiter, please give me the menu: 服务员, 请给我菜单 (Fú wù yuan,qĭng gěi wŏ cài dān) 

What can you recommend?: 你有什么可以向我推荐?(nǐ yǒu shénme kěyǐ xiàng wǒ tuī jiàn?)

What’s the most popular dish here?: 这里最火的菜是什么? (zhè lǐ zuì huǒ de cài shì shén me)“

Where is the restroom ?: 洗手间在哪里 ? (xĭ shǒu jiān zài nă lǐ)

Restroom/WC:洗手间 (xĭ shǒu jiān) or 厕所 (cè suǒ)


Complaints : 

这不是我点的  (zhè bú shì wǒ diǎn de) :This isn’t what I ordered 

我点了炒饭,还没到 (wǒ diǎn le chǎo fàn, hái méi dào) :I ordered some fried rice and it hasn’t arrived.  

帐单不对 (zhàng dān bù duì) : The bill is not right. 

Other phrases : 

I don’t want MSG : 我不要味精 (wǒ bú yào wèi jīng)

I don’t want it spicy : 我不要辣的 (wǒ bú yào là de)

I don’t eat meat : 我不吃肉 (wǒ bù chī ròu)

I am a vegetarian : 我吃素 wǒ chī sù

I am vegan : 我吃全素 (wǒ chī quán sù) (or 我吃 纯素 wǒ chī chún sù)

I’m sorry, is it possible not to put meat in that? : 不好意思,可以不放肉吗 ?(bù hǎoyìsi, kěyǐ bù fàng ròu ma?)


After the meal, you might say :

The bill, please!: 买单! (mǎi dān) or 我买单 wǒ mǎidān (I would like to pay) 

How much is it (in total)?:  一共多少钱?  (yí gòng duō shǎo qián)

Can I use a credit card?: 刷卡可以吗? (shuā kǎ kě yǐ mā) 

Pay together: 一起付 (yī qǐ fù) 

Pay separately:分开付 (fēn kāi fù)

[EXTRA] 

It’s not customary to tip in restaurants in China. If the service was exceptionally good, and you are paying in cash, you can simply ask them to keep the change as a tip.

  • Don’t need to give me the change. It is a tip : 别找了,算小费吧。(bié zhǎo le, suàn xiǎ fèi ba)

or 

  • 不用找了,当小费吧!(bú yòng zhǎo le dāng xiǎo fèi ba)” :No need to get change, keep it as a tip!
time.com
'Fresh Off the Boat' Star: I Don't Need to Represent Every Asian Mom Ever

On stereotypes: I think the reason people have been quick to throw the stereotype criticism on us is because there will always be people who are laughing at the wrong thing. Some people are like, “Oh, stereotypical accent!” An accent is an accent. If there were jokes written about the accent, then that would certainly be harmful. But there aren’t jokes written about it. It’s not even talked about. It’s just a fact of life: immigrants have accents. Making the choice to have that is a way of not watering down the character and making it politically correct. It’s choosing authenticity over safety, and I think that’s bold. The people who are going to laugh at the alleged stereotypes are the same people who are going to laugh at their Chinese waiter in the restaurant next door for very coarse, uneducated reasons.

On accents: I don’t think her foreignness is ever the butt of the joke. She’s aware of her difference, yet she doesn’t think that’s any reason for her to not have a voice. It doesn’t elicit shame in her. She doesn’t become a shrinking violet. And instead of that being something that Asians should be embarrassed of, I think that’s something that we should be proud of — the types of characters who know they don’t speak perfect English, who know they have different customs, who don’t think that that’s any reason for them to not have a voice.

On Asian representation: We shouldn’t be a voice for all Asians. We are such a varied group that there’s no one show that can be like, “This is what Asian America looks like!” But we’re given that burden because we’re so rarely represented. If you see Tina Fey on television, you’re not like, “All white women are like Tina Fey.” Yet people are like, “Oh, Jessica Huang’s not like mymother, but this show is supposed to be about Asians, so shouldn’t she be like my mother?” I understand the burden, because the history of our representation on TV is very sparse. But we’d be doing a disservice to the people who are worried about that by watering it down instead of trying to be specific. Specificity is what makes good storytelling, and good storytelling is what makes money, and making money is then what encourages new producers to invest in different stories about Asians.

Some people are like, “Oh, stereotypical accent!” An accent is an accent. If there were jokes written about the accent, then that would certainly be harmful. But there aren’t jokes written about it. It’s not even talked about. It’s just a fact of life: immigrants have accents. Making the choice to have that is a way of not watering down the character and making it politically correct. It’s choosing authenticity over safety, and I think that’s bold. The people who are going to laugh at the alleged stereotypes are the same people who are going to laugh at their Chinese waiter in the restaurant next door for very coarse, uneducated reasons.
My life as a female Kpop fan

Me: Omg I love Kpop

Goes into store with family.. See’s Asian dude

My step dad: Ooh, look there you go a nice Asian man I know how much you like them

Goes to a Chinese restaurant that has a young male Chinese waiter

My step dad: You should ask him for his number

Goes into Walmart Asian dude shopping on the same aisle as me

My step dad: whispers to me (Why don’t you go hop on that)

Me: I really want to visit Japan one day

My step dad: Why, so you can bring back a Japanese man

Me:

Yes I like Kpop, yes I think the idols are attractive. But that does not mean I lust after every Asian man that I come across like jfc

*at a beautiful, romantic chinese restaurant*
  • waiter: thank-you for choosing our restaurant as the setting for your date, have a great night.
  • dan: this is not a date this is a serious business meeting between two platonic friends.
  • waiter: ...
  • dan: *shoves chopsticks into pockets* i feel so attACKed right now i gotta go. fyi i like vagina.

Q: Do you still miss John? 

GEORGE: Oh well…in some ways it would be real handy if we could talk to him because of the way certain things, business decisions…because now that quarter of us is gone…and yet it isn’t, because Yoko’s there, you know; she’s still Beatling more than anybody. It would be easier if John was around just to…get things solved.

Q: There have been various incidents: the selling of the Beatles’ song catalogue, the use of Revolution on the American Nike TV ad…

GEORGE: Well that’s the main thing that happened. It’s like a conflict. Four of us were a partnership and it’s daft when three people and the company are trying to set certain precedents and establish certain things and one of them is going off on the side and doing a deal. It makes everybody else look stupid.

Q: Do you see Yoko?

GEORGE: No, I haven’t seen her for a few years. I don’t really know her actually. I spoke to her at that time, you know, a few times after John’s death, but I didn’t really know her when she was around when John was around. You know, she wasn’t particularly interested in any of us anyway.

Q: Do you worry about your own safety after John’s death?

GEORGE: No, because there’s no point. It can happen to anybody - you can fall under a truck. I read somewhere in a book once: “Life is fragile like a raindrop on a lotus leaf” and if you’ve ever seen a raindrop on a lotus leaf you’ll know what I mean. People think I’ve lived in seclusion because of John’s death, but I was already doing that long before. The last time I did press on an album was 1976 and John got killed at the end of 1980, so for four years I’d already been the Howard Hughes Of Pop, allegedly. I try to be careful and sensible but I don’t go around worrying that Al Capone’s going to come and get me, otherwise we’d all be nervous wrecks. I’m almost a nervous wreck anyway!

But yeah, we miss him. We miss him around because he was so funny. One of the disc jockeys, Roger Scott (London’s Capital Radio) gave me this little bootleg. It was just the talking between two songs, mainly John and Paul trying to get their harmonies right but it’s really funny. The dialogue that was going on there was brilliant. John says, Did you see that movie the other night? And Paul says, What, Humph? And John says, Yeah, Humph Boge. And Paul says, Humph Boge’s fab…It was just really silly stuff like that. It’s still like that with us. The other night when we all got together there were about 15 conversations going on at the same time with this Chinese waiter trying to get the order in and Ringo saying, Now you come over here, I wanna talk to you, ‘cos he can’t eat onions. It gives you glimpses. God knows how we got through all them years. It was just bedlam, really. It was madness. 

- Q magazine (1988)

[credit to friarparksoulclub for sending me this article]