chinese origami

Grad student bride WIN

Making a gorgeous kusudama-flower bridal bouquet (that doubles as a nice eco-friendly wedding favour) from cut-up pieces of incomprehensible scholarly articles that you were forced to print out for coursework research and now have no use for.

I feel like I would be a bad student if I didn’t properly cite my bouquet… So in case anyone’s interested:

Peter J. Pels, “The Spirit of Matter: On Fetish, Rarity, Fact and Fancy.” In Border Fetishisms: Material Objects in Unstable Spaces, ed. Patricia Spyer (New York: Routledge, 2001), 91-121.

Peter J. Pels, “Magical Things: On Fetishes, Commodities and Computers.” In The Oxford Handbook of Material Culture Studies, ed. D. Hicks and M.C. Beaudry (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010), 613-33.

Ming-Bao Yue, “Nostalgia for the Future: Cultural Revolution Memory in Two Transnational Chinese Narratives.” The China Review 5, no. 2 (Autumn 2005), 43-63.

Modular Origami Winged Swam from 181 Pieces

3D Origami, Golden Venture Origami, Chinese Paperfolding, whatever you choose to call it, is an intensive form of origami which involves creating many pieces and assembling them together to create shapes, animals, flowers, and much more. To learn about the history, please see my first 3D origami guide.

The winged swan is one of the most breathtaking pieces in 3D origami—it takes the initial beauty of a regular swan, and incorporates a more anatomically-correct wing design. However, these models can take even the expert folder hours to create.

This is a simplified model of my own design, which incorporates the wing and tail detail from the original winged swan, but reduces the overall model size. In comparison, the pieces for this model can be made in around 45 minutes.