china sights

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There’s red on the ceiling and red on the floor, red dripping from the window sills and red globules splattered across the walls. It looks like the artist Anish Kapoor has been let loose with his wax cannon again. But this, in fact, is what the making of Christmas looks like; this is the very heart of the real Santa’s workshop – thousands of miles from the North Pole, in the Chinese city of Yiwu.

Our yuletide myth-making might like to imagine that Christmas is made by rosy-cheeked elves hammering away in a snow-bound log cabin somewhere in the Arctic Circle. But it’s not. The likelihood is that most of those baubles, tinsel and flashing LED lights you’ve draped liberally around your house came from Yiwu, 300km south of Shanghai – where there’s not a (real) pine tree nor (natural) snowflake in sight.

Christened “China’s Christmas village”, Yiwu is home to 600 factories that collectively churn out over 60% of all the world’s Christmas decorations and accessories, from glowing fibre-optic trees to felt Santa hats. The “elves” that staff these factories are mainly migrant labourers, working 12 hours a day for a maximum of £200 to £300 a month – and it turns out they’re not entirely sure what Christmas is.

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/architecture-design-blog/2014/dec/19/santas-real-workshop-the-town-in-china-that-makes-the-worlds-christmas-decorations

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Santa’s real workshop: the town in China that makes the world’s Christmas decorations
December 26, 2014

There’s red on the ceiling and red on the floor, red dripping from the window sills and red globules splattered across the walls. It looks like the artist Anish Kapoor has been let loose with his wax cannon again. But this, in fact, is what the making of Christmas looks like; this is the very heart of the real Santa’s workshop – thousands of miles from the North Pole, in the Chinese city of Yiwu.

Our yuletide myth-making might like to imagine that Christmas is made by rosy-cheeked elves hammering away in a snow-bound log cabin somewhere in the Arctic Circle. But it’s not. The likelihood is that most of those baubles, tinsel and flashing LED lights you’ve draped liberally around your house came from Yiwu, 300km south of Shanghai – where there’s not a (real) pine tree nor (natural) snowflake in sight.

Christened “China’s Christmas village”, Yiwu is home to 600 factories that collectively churn out over 60% of all the world’s Christmas decorations and accessories, from glowing fibre-optic trees to felt Santa hats. The “elves” that staff these factories are mainly migrant labourers, working 12 hours a day for a maximum of £200 to £300 a month – and it turns out they’re not entirely sure what Christmas is.

“Maybe it’s like [Chinese] New Year for foreigners,” says 19-year-old Wei, a worker who came to Yiwu from rural Guizhou province this year, speaking to Chinese news agency Sina. Together with his father, he works long days in the red-splattered lair, taking polystyrene snowflakes, dipping them in a bath of glue, then putting them in a powder-coating machine until they turn red – and making 5,000 of the things every day.

In the process, the two of them end up dusted from head to toe in fine crimson powder. His dad wears a Santa hat (not for the festive spirit, he says, but to stop his hair from turning red) and they both get through at least 10 face masks a day, trying not to breathe in the dust. It’s a tiring job and they probably won’t do it again next year: once they’ve earned enough money for Wei to get married, they plan on returning home to Guizhou and hopefully never seeing a vat of red powder again.

Packaged up in plastic bags, their gleaming red snowflakes hang alongside a wealth of other festive paraphernalia across town in the Yiwu International Trade Market, aka China Commodity City, a 4m sq m wonder-world of plastic tat. It is a pound shop paradise, a sprawling trade show of everything in the world that you don’t need and yet may, at some irrational moment, feel compelled to buy. There are whole streets in the labyrinthine complex devoted to artificial flowers and inflatable toys, then come umbrellas and anoraks, plastic buckets and clocks. It is a heaving multistorey monument to global consumption, as if the contents of all the world’s landfill sites had been dug-up, re-formed and meticulously catalogued back into 62,000 booths.

The complex was declared by the UN to be the “largest small commodity wholesale market in the world” and the scale of the operation necessitates a kind of urban plan, with this festival of commerce organised into five different districts. District Two is where Christmas can be found.

There are corridors lined with nothing but tinsel, streets throbbing with competing LED light shows, stockings of every size, plastic Christmas trees in blue and yellow and fluorescent pink, plastic pine cones in gold and silver. Some of it seems lost in translation: there are sheep in Santa hats and tartan-embroidered reindeer, and of course lots of that inexplicable Chinese staple, Father Christmas playing the saxophone.

It might look like a wondrous bounty, but the market’s glory days seem to have passed: it’s now losing out to internet giants like Alibaba and Made In China. On Alibaba alone, you can order 1.4m different Christmas decorations to be delivered to your door at the touch of a button. Yiwu market, by comparison, stocks a mere 400,000 products.

Aiming at the lower end of the market, Yiwu’s sales thrived during the recession, as the world shopped for cut-price festive fun, but international sales are down this year. Still, according to Cai Qingliang, vice chairman of the Yiwu Christmas Products Industry Association, domestic appetite is on the rise, as China embraces the annual festival of Mammon. Santa Claus, says the Economist, is now better known to most Chinese people than Jesus.

The beaming sales reps of Yiwu market couldn’t sound happier with their life sentence of eternal Christmastime. According to Cheng Yaping, co-founder of the Boyang Craft Factory, who runs a stall decked out like a miniature winter wonderland: “Sitting here every day, being able to look at all these beautiful decorations, is really great for your mood.”

It’s somehow unlikely that those on the other end of the production line, consigned to dipping snowflakes in red-swamped workshops for us to pick up at the checkout for 99p, feel quite the same way.

Source

More pictures are to be released by China apparently show nuclear impact craters and building debris caused by explosions in an effort by NASA to destroy the truth. China is moving toward full disclosure of the Extraterrestrial reality, if these images and future ones are verified genuine then NASA should be investigated for fraud and treason. China will be releasing all the data and more images from the Chang’e-2 in the coming weeks and months, lets hope this is the beginning of a new era.

Hongcun Village

Hongcun is a village in Yi County in the historical Huizhou region of southern Anhui Province, China, near the southwest slope of Mount Huangshan. This village goes way back to the Ming and Qing Dynasty.

Hongcun has many beautiful sites, one of them is Chengzi Hall, which includes a small museum. Moon Pond, which is centered in Hongcun Village reflects its views of the buildings and sites on the surface.

Interestingly enough, the village is arranged in the shape of an ox with Leigang Hill interpreted as the head, and two trees standing on it as the horns. Four bridges across the Jiyin stream can be seen as the legs while the houses of the village form the body. Inside the “body”, the Jiyin stream represents the intestines and various lakes, such as the “South Lake” (Nanhu) form the other internal organs.

How to Get There

Buses are available from Huangshan Bus Station in the downtown.Besides, there are also buses from Tangkou Bus Station to Hongcun.Tangkou Bus Station is located at the foot of Huangshan Scenic Area

It takes an hour and 10 minutes to get there if you’re taking a tour vehicle or taxi.

To keep in mind, the village opens at 7:30am-5:30pm and it cost you an entrance fee too, which is 104 yuan (17 USD)

Fun Fact

The very popular 2000 movie Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon was filmed exactly in this village. This brought popularity in Hongcun as the film became widely popular even in the West.

Sources:

http://www.chinatravelca.com/places/hong-village/

http://www.chinahighlights.com/huangshan/attraction/hongcun-village.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hongcun

http://www.chinahighlights.com/travelguide/most-beautiful-places.htm

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Three UFOs Crashed in Heilongjiang Province, China – May 17, 2014

Three unidentified flying objects fall from heaven and plunged into the territory of Yian and Baiquan under the jurisdiction of Qiqihar City, Heilongjiang Province.

At 13.00 a reporter from Heilongjiang Yian Committee Propaganda Department confirmed that villagers heard a piercing sound and saw a big fireball through the sky before crashing to the ground.

The reporters Cong Cunmin and Chu Paishe from the news agency photographed one of the metal mysterious spherical objects.

One of the objects landed in a home garden, two other similar objects crashed in another county. According the latest updated news, it seems as two more similar objects have been found in the same area.

The entire area is locked down by military and authorities have ordered to carry out a full investigation. (Translated.)

Image credit: chinanews.com

Source: http://ufosightingshotspot.blogspot.ca/2014/05/three-ufos-crashed-in-heilongjiang.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed:+UfoSightingsHotspot+(UFO+Sightings+Hotspot)&m=1

Hetalia playing Pokemon GO
  • America: *At England's door* OPEN UP BITCH YOU GOT A MEW IN THERE AND IM NOT LETTING IT GET OUT OF MY SIGHT!
  • China: How does it know where they are and I do not know where they are? Oh- OH MY LORD EKANS IS IN FRONT OF ME! CALL AN ARMY! KILL IT!!!
  • England: I would never play a child's game (finds all of them on the down low and is really excited when he finds one)
  • Russia: I started at my house and now I am at America's house...
  • Italy: *Phone goes off in the middle of the night* They're nEAR!
  • Prussia: *sniffs* I can smell how close the pokemon are to me
Chinese Astronaut :Sound of an alien? Astronaut baffled by mysterious banging noise in space

AN ASTRONAUT has reported being left stunned by a mysterious knocking noise from the outside of his space craft. Yang Liwei, 51, has told in an interview how he heard the inexplicable bang - described as being like a “wooden hammer hitting an iron bucket”, during his maiden space flight in 2003. Liwei, who is China’s first astronaut, admitted being baffled by the noise which he said appeared “suddenly without any reason”, on more than one occasion, according to Xinhua news agency.

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UFO Sighting Over Hong Kong, China!

Date of UFO sighting: June 19, 2016
Location: Yin Lai Court, Hong Kong, China
Source: ejinsight.com

Hong Kong had an interesting evening as they had an unexpected other worldly visitor. There were countless UFO reports coming from all over the area of Yin Lai Court while a lucky few were able to record the craft. Some may say this could just be a drone hovering over the area OR some may say this could actually be something other worldly. See for yourselves and decide on the debate.

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