children's author

  • What she says: I'm fine
  • What she means: The Iron Giant is such a vastly overlooked cartoon classic which didn't get nearly enough recognition despite its originality and its approach to mature topics in a way that was accessible to a young audience. From the way Brad Bird handled the villain, a man driven mad by the paranoia inflicted on him by government propaganda, to his clear and unflinching anti-war message, The Iron Giant encouraged children to question authority and be suspicious of the media we are spoon fed, and I will always wonder whether there were more sinister forces at work which kept the film from reaching a wider audience. Also, I am so thirsty for Dean McCoppin, it is embarrassing.
Dr. Seuss Quotes

Check sun & moon !!

Aries -

“Oh the things you can find, if you don’t stay behind!”

Taurus -

“You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose.”

Gemini -

“You are you. Now isn’t that pleasant.”

Cancer -

“Sometimes you will never know the value of a moment, until it becomes a memory.”

Leo -

“So, open your mouth, lad! For every voice counts!”

Virgo -

“Step with care and great tact, and remember that life’s a great balancing act.”

Libra -

“A person’s a person, no matter how small.”

Scorpio -

“Don’t cry because it’s over. Smile because it happened.”

Sagittarius -

Sometimes the questions are complicated and the answers are simple.”

Capricorn -

“Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It’s not.”

Aquarius -

“Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don’t matter and those who matter don’t mind.“

Pisces -

“Today was good. Today was fun. Tomorrow is another one.”

8

Charles Perrault (12 January 1628 – 16 May 1703) 

French author and member of the Académie Française. He laid the foundations for a new literary genre, the fairy tale, with his works derived from pre-existing folk tales. The best known of his tales include Le Petit Chaperon Rouge (Little Red Riding Hood), Cendrillon (Cinderella), Le Chat Botté (Puss in Boots), La Belle au bois Dormant (The Sleeping Beauty), and Barbe Bleue (Bluebeard). (Wikipedia)

From our stacks: Illustrations from The Cinderella Fairy Book; containing: Cinderella, or the Glass Slipper, Puss in Boots, Red Riding Hood, Drill of the A, B, C, Army. With Twenty-eight Colored Illustrations. Cincinnati: Peter G. Thomson, 1881.

One day, the wise woman of the village called all the children to her house.

She sat with them in a circle, and they ate and sang together until the moon was high in the sky. The children had never been allowed to stay up as late. They were excited. Their tongues prickled with the spicy soup that the wise woman had given them.

When the fire was just a low glimmer of ash and wood anymore, the woman lifted her hand.

The children that had been laughing and chattering fell quiet.

The woman said: “Show me the palm of your hand, and tell me only the truth. Swear on it.”

“I swear,” said the children. Some whispered it, some barely got out the words, but all of them were shivering because they felt something old and large reach for their hearts. They didn’t know if it was the soup, the woman’s power, the moon, or just their own awe before the world and the night that made them speak truthfully.

The wise woman lowered her hand. She looked at one after the other. Her eyes were warm as the fire, dark as the moon’s shawl above.

“Speak what you wish to raise in your life.”

Everyone was silent for a long time.

The woman turned her head towards the first boy.

“Family,” the boy mumbled. Then, a bit louder, clutching his empty soup bowl, he looked at everyone with honey golden eyes, wide with kindness. “Mine and others.”

The old woman said nothing. Only her head moved from then on, and it pointed to the next, the next, one after the other.

And the children spoke.

“Health.”

“Knowledge.”

“Happiness.”

“Imagination.”

“Adventure.”

“Fun.”

“Strength.”

“Animals.”

While the children said their words, the old woman drank them in. She let then settle into her memory, anchored them where they were safe.

One day, when the children were of age, she would ask them again.

Some would have changed. If they had lost their path, she would remind them of their old words, of the dreams their hearts had forgotten about. That there was a way forward, in whatever direction it may run. If they had found another way for themselves, she would gift them their once-adored word still, so that they had something to always return to and would know that once feeling something did not mean that you wouldn’t ever feel something else.

And if the children still chose the same way, then it would be their time to raise something.

So the children spoke their words. Only two were left now and before the woman could turn her head, they spoke at the same time.

“Hell.”

“Myself.”

The other children shivered. For a long time, nothing moved. Even the fire seemed frozen in the moment. Finally, the woman tilted her head.

“What do you mean?” she asked the two. She hadn’t asked anyone else.

The first child stood up, hands curled into fists, eyes burning. “If anyone gets in my way, I’ll bring all of the world down on them!”

“I’m scared,” whispered one of the children.

The woman looked at the other child, whose eyes were calm as the dark sky above. “And you?”

“Myself,” said the child once more. “Nothing more and nothing less.”

The first child laughed. “That’s stupid. Just yourself? What can you do with that! When I’m older, the world won’t stand a chance against me.”

Before the second child could speak, the old woman stirred. She reached out for the child’s fingers and took them into her own. The other children watched, wary and confused.

“Before you raise any of your dreams,” said the old woman, a smile on her fire-warmed lips, “I want all of you to remember this.” And when the child who stood glared at her, she took its hand as well until it sat and put its head against her shoulder.

“Raise yourself, children, and you will stand against anything. Raise yourself, and the whole world will rise with you. Hell and heaven and every fear will fall if you hold yourself upright and look to the stars. And if you cannot rise anymore, stand. Stand. The horizon has been born for thousands of years, every morning and every night. Admire its strength, when you are weak, but do not forget:

You are the dawn. You are the dusk.

The world will follow. Raise all that you are, before anything else.”

- You’re just 18, you’re too young, don’t get pregnant or marry someone to quickly, - they pleaded.
- You’re 25, come on, it’s time to think and start doing something, you don’t need any kids, focus on your career, - they preached.
- You’re 32, what are you thinking? Do you want to end up as a single crazy catlady? - they cried.
- You’re 39, a single mother without a successful startup or a fabulous career, you’re such a disappointment, - they grumbled.
- She was 42, when she jumped out of the window. What a disgrace to the family, - they whispered.

The only thing they’ve never told you was when to start living your life on your own…
— 

Don’t lose your way while trying to satisfy all the expectations: they are never worth wasting your life.

© illirein

theguardian.com
Top 10 books by transgender authors featuring trans characters

Cisgender authors can write great trans characters, but trans authors live the experiences of their characters every day and their voices need to be the loudest on trans issues, argues teen writer John Hansen. So here’s a list of the best trans YA and middle grade books by trans and non-binary authors