children with aids

I WIN!

So … my husband is kind of the best person on the planet.   I know, I know.. everyone has their own awesome people who they would challenge me with. But here’s just another reason why I’m so unbelievably grateful for mine.   This was his post on FB in response to SNL’s  HILARIOUS joke:   

So this “humor” is infuriating to me on many different levels.

First of all, there is the basic assumption that diabetes is caused by poor lifestyle choices. The cliche is obese, weak willed folks who would rather sacrifice their independence for another bite of cotton candy.

Diabetes kills more people each year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. Diabetes is hilarious.

By the way, where are the jokes about the slobs who gave themselves breast cancer or AIDS?

Oh I forgot, the poor children that get AIDS from blood transfusions, and the ladies who are genetically prone to cancer or exposed to environmental factors. It’s not their fault.

Wonder what my wife did to give herself diabetes at age 3? She must’ve done something to make her immune system render her pancreas useless. The laughs keep coming.

Type 2 is lifestyle though…well if that were the case how many of you bacon eating, craft beer swilling paradigms of health and fitness would have diabetes? It’s still genetic. Sure lifestyle choices can exacerbate health challenges but show me a person who gave themselves diabetes and i will show you the unicorn they rode in on.

“But so many diabetic people are fat fatties.”
Where my bro-science gym bros at? We all know insulin is a growth hormone right?
Maybe you’ve read about competitive bodybuilders supplementing insulin to get BIGGER?

So imagine your pancreas doesn’t work right you gotta take insulin to balance out blood sugar levels so you don’t die. You inject insulin, a growth hormone (makes tissue BIGGER, fatty tissue, muscle tissue), but it’s not an exact science because so much affects blood sugar; stress, exercise, other hormones in the body. So your sugar might crash….. and pancreas still don’t work. You gotta drink a lot of a sugary beverage or eat mass amounts of simple sugars like candy to raise the blood glucose level, again, so you don’t die. Those calories get stored somewhere. Sure diabetics have a choice. Most choose not to die, and we vilify them for being overweight.

Anyway I’m rambling…remind me why diabetes is funny again?

How to write D/deaf/HoH characters

this has probably already been done, but i am so sick of reading fanfiction that has totally inaccurate portrayals of deaf/HoH characters, so I’m making a guide

This turned out really long, so you can read the whole thing under the cut

ATTENTION: If someone wants me to do another one of these resource posts for a more specific D/deaf/HoH issue, such as how to write deaf children, different types of hearing aids, deaf accomodations, etc just shoot me an ask and i’ll make one!

Keep reading

7

Diana, Princess of Wales {July 1,1961 - August 31,1997}

“Caring for people who are dying and helping the bereaved was something for which Diana had passion and commitment. When she stroked the limbs of someone with leprosy, or sat on the bed of a man with HIV/AIDS and held his hand, she transformed public attitudes and improved the life chances of such people. People felt if a British princess can go to a ward with HIV patients, then there’s nothing to be superstitious about.”

(Nelson Mandela, at a press conference in London 2002.)

“Hillary and I admired her for her work for children, for people with AIDS, for the cause of ending the scourge of land mines in the world and for her love for her children William and Harry.”

(American President Bill Clinton)

“Princess Diana in her official position and in a personal capacity has made an extraordinary contribution not only to her country but to the world.”

(Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chretien)

“She was well loved and admired across the Commonwealth and was emerging as a potent symbol of our common humanity in her evident commitment to others less fortunate than herself.”

(Commonwealth Secretary General Emeka Anyaoku)

“She represented Britain with nobility and warmth and she captured the imagination of millions throughout the world with her dedication to her children and to innumerable worthy causes. Her untimely death is a shock to all who admired her and who will cherish her memory.”

(Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu)

“Her genuine concern for the plight of others and her ability to talk to anybody and make them feel special were her remarkable qualities. Her loss has been felt here very deeply because of the wonderful work she did here with patients. She will be very deeply missed.”

(Rebecca Mosley, The Royal Marsden NHS Trustt’s communications manager)

i buy the “childrens” band-aids with cute designs on them because they bring me little doses of joy and cuteness in my life and honestly? hell will freeze over before i’ll feel ashamed of that

In case you thought only the CDC’s practices were questionable/criminal…

NIH Tested AIDS Drugs on Foster Children

Earlier this May, the Associated Press reported that National Institutes of Health researchers tested AIDS drugs on hundreds of foster children in the late 1980s and ‘90s. In many instances, the drugs were given without independent advocates who monitor the safety of these children. Ed Gordon explores the controversy with two AIDS experts: Dr. Jonathan Fishbein of the National Institutes of Health and Baylor College of Medicine’s Dr. Mark Kline.

7

Prince Harry dancing & having fun..

(such a genuine person)

9

”Caring for people who are dying and helping the bereaved was something for which Diana had passion and commitment. When she stroked the limbs of someone with leprosy, or sat on the bed of a man with HIV/AIDS and held his hand, she transformed public attitudes and improved the life chances of such people. People felt if a British princess can go to a ward with HIV patients, then there’s nothing to be superstitious about.” -Nelson Mandela 

“We clicked in an intangible way’ probably because of our upbringing.” -George Michael 

“She was fun and accessible, that’s why people loved her.” -Sir Elton John

“Only in storybooks do you get to dance with a princess until midnight. But it happened to me.” -John Travolta 

“Hillary and I admired her for her work for children, for people with AIDS, for the cause of ending the scourge of land mines in the world and for her love for her children William and Harry.” -President Bill Clinton

“Losing a close family member is one of the hardest experiences that anyone can ever endure. My mother Diana was present at your launch 15 years ago, and today I am incredibly proud to be able to continue her support for your fantastic charity, by becoming your royal patron. Never being able to say the word ‘Mummy’ again in your life sounds like a small thing. However, for many, including me, it’s now really just a word – hollow and evoking only memories.”  -HRH Prince William, Duke of Cambridge 

“I really miss Diana. I loved her so much. She was one of the quickest wits I knew; nobody made me laugh like her.” -Sarah, Duchess of York

“I always think of my mother in everything I do. I hope she would be proud of my work. My brother and I often ask ourselves: what would our mother have done in this situation? My mother was to me, like my brother, a role model. And also to many people worldwide. I believe people took to her so warmly because she possessed the ability to take away their embarrassment in whatever situation she met them in. She was immediately sympathetic. Exactly like her, I know that I enjoy a privileged position as a member of the royal family and I must use what was given to me to try to make a difference in important topics.” -HRH Prince Henry of Wales

9

Prince Harry visits Lesotho where he helped to set up the charity Sentebale ‘Touching Tiny Lives’ which provides healthcare and education to vulnerable children in Mokhotlong, Lesotho, southern Africa. The particular theme of his visit was to check on the progress of the Mamohato children’s centre which will provide vital support to children affected by HIV

Harry photographed parts of his visit himself: ‘I have always enjoyed photography and the challenges that come with trying to capture the perfect shot, although privately I don’t take many photos. The best photos I have are in my head, I have some very special memories, mostly from Africa. But on this visit, I had the time and opportunity to be on the other side of the camera and take some photos in the stunning country of Lesotho for my charity Sentebale’

Whatever you do, don’t imagine Rei as a pediatric doctor. Don’t imagine how great he is at keeping the kids distracted while administering immunizations or tending to their injuries, ear infections, or achy tummies. Please don’t be tempted to think of how gently he speaks with them and how he constantly reminds them of how well they’re doing. It would be very dangerous to imagine him cheering up the scared and crying children with cute band-aids and lollipops. Just… do yourself a favor and don’t imagine how adorable that would be.

Aren’t you glad I warned you? (˵¯͒〰¯͒˵)

(And definitely don’t imagine that is a Makoharu baby)

“This photo of Nong (five years old) was taken in his hometown of Plong sub-district, Thoeng district, Chiang Rai province on Dec 7, 2009 at a community event near the Thai-Laos border. After both his parents died from AIDS, Nong, who is also living with HIV/AIDS, moved in with his grandfather. A few months before this photo was taken, a meeting was held concerning Nong entering kindergarten. Parents were afraid Nong would bite children and infect them with AIDS. The mayor intervened and allowed Nong to enter school, but he was shunned by teachers and students alike and was rarely seen playing with others. Nong inspired my community health station and I to put on educational workshops and public media letting people know about the dangers and myths about contracting HIV/AIDS.”

CAN YOU SEE ME?
(Left) Salome [NAME CHANGED] is HIV-positive. She is 7 years old and lives with her sister at the Turkana Outreach Orphanage in Kenya, run by Ruth Kuya, who was herself orphaned at age 12. Salome’s mother contracted HIV while she was a sex worker and died of AIDS-related causes. The Orphanage began in 1994 and now shelters 40 children, most of whom have been affected by HIV/AIDS; five are HIV-positive.

© UNICEF/Shehzad Noorani

To see more: www.unicef.org/photography

vimeo

This is a small short I made in traditional animation.