chicago libraries

Are you going to C2E2 this weekend? Wanna find some cool new queer comics?

Visit me at the pop-up library in Booth 853, right in front of The Block at 2pm on Saturday!  I’ll be talking up some of my favorite LGBTQ comics and giving personalized recommendations to help you find the bestest, coolest, and queerest choices for you!  Think of me like your personal comics concierge.   See you there!

Bob’s New York

See New York through Robert Rauschenberg’s eyes with “Bob’s New York,” our guide to the sites of friendship and exchange that marked his time in the city. Our first stop: 6 West 95th Street, the studio and apartment Bob shared with his wife, artist Susan Weil in 1950. It was here, in the building’s shared bathroom, that the pair created the blueprints that offered them their first recognition: a 3-page spread in LIFE magazine.

Explore more sites from “Bob’s New York” on mo.ma/bobsny, and visit mo.ma/bobsmap to map out your own #RauschenbergAmongFriends walking tour.

[Rauschenberg demonstrating the blueprint process for Life photojournalist Wallace Kirkland. Photo: Wallace Kirkland. Courtesy University of Illinois at Chicago Library Special Collections]

Harper Memorial Library, University of Chicago

This was taken a week or so ago as I left campus after class; on Fridays this quarter, I always had philosophy discussion until about 5:30pm.

There’s always something calm about campus on Friday evenings, when everyone’s left and gone back to their dorms or apartments, maybe taking a nap or relaxing after a long week, welcoming the weekend.

April 4, 2016 // [1/100]

67 days until graduation, but it’s still snowing here in Chicago and I’ve still got an awful lot of a BA to write, so that two-month-away-impending-reality isn’t hitting me hard just yet.

I decided to start this 100 days of productivity thing, if for no other reason than a bit of an excuse to document my last days of this epic adventure of college. Not sure what the last 33 days will look like, but I am sure there will be ample opportunity with many ~productive~ things to keep me occupied in the transition to the real world.

6

Opening the Book on Brutalism

Brutalism derives its name from the French “béton brut,” which translates to “raw concrete.” But the mid-20th-century architecture movement was not founded on concrete alone — exemplified by the Joseph Regenstein Library that SOM completed in 1970. Walter Netsch clad the largest library at the University of Chicago in deeply grooved, sawn limestone slabs that seem to slip past one another. This many-layered texturing lends the 577,000-square-foot building a more human-scale quality that harmonizes with the historic campus. It also captures other tenets of Brutalism, such as the outward expression of program and the conveyance of gravitas, for which concrete is but one possible medium.

  • man at a board meeting about the columbia college chicago library: aight i have an idea.......we're gonna just dump a bunch of legos on a table for the students to play with
  • man 2: don't you think that would make the most annoying of students congregate?
  • man: yeah, probably, where should we put it?
  • man 2: well definitely not in the middle of an empty area on the third floor so their loud discussions and lego-fiddling can amplify throughout the entirity of the floor
  • man: SORRY WHAT WAS THAT YOU SAID "IN THE MIDDLE OF AN EMPTY AREA ON THE THIRD FLOOR" RIGHT LET ME JUST (DUMPS 6000 LEGOS IN THE MIDDLE OF AN EMPTY AREA ON THE THIRD FLOOR)