chicago exhibition

Portrait of Mary Johnson (c.1927). John Theodore Johnson (American, 1902-1963). Oil on canvas.

Johnson was educated at the Art Institute of Chicago from 1921 to 1925. He became an artist and instructor in Life Drawing at the Institute from 1928 to 1929. Mary, a portrait, was awarded a Mr. and Mrs. Frank G. Logan Prize at the 1928 Chicago and Vicinity annual exhibition of the Art Institute of Chicago.

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Adam Reed Tucker is one of 14 Lego Certified Professionals in the world and has an exhibit at Chicago’s Museum of Science and Industry. Brick by Brick features 13 of his creations, each a model of some of the world’s most famous architectural works. The Golden Gate Bridge, the Colosseum, and One World Trade Center are rendered in miniature.

That’s something of a relative term, here: The “miniature” Lego version of the Golden Gate Bridge comprises 64,500 Lego bricks, took 260 hours to build, and is 60 feet long. That’s as big as some of the dinosaurs on display the American Museum of Natural History in New York.

Check out more of Tucker’s Lego creations.

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North Korea: inside the world’s most secret state | See full gallery

The mystery and secrecy behind North Korea tend to fascinate as much as they frighten. In Chicago, a new exhibition juxtaposes officially sanctioned images by the state press agency with images produced outside official channels – showing there might be more to North Korea than meets the eye.

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Exquisite Lego Versions of the World’s Most Famous Buildings

BECOMING A LEGO Certified Professional is a bit like becoming a master sommelier. To be inducted is to join the ranks of the nonpareil, to be a member of the 0.0001 percent with absolute devotion to mastery of one’s subject. But of the two, the cadre of Lego elite is the most exclusive. There are 147 people on the Court of Master Sommeliers, but there are just 14 Lego Certified Professionals in the world.

Adam Reed Tucker is one of them, and he has an exhibit at Chicago’s Museum of Science and Industry. Brick by Brickfeatures 13 of his creations, each a model of some of the world’s most famous architectural works. The Golden Gate Bridge, the Colosseum, and One World Trade Center are rendered in miniature. That’s something of a relative term, here: The “miniature” Lego version of the Golden Gate Bridge comprises 64,500 Lego bricks, took 260 hours to build, and is 60 feet long. That’s as big as some of the dinosaurs on display the American Museum of Natural History in New York.

Brick by Brick also features replicas of Dubai’s Burj Khalifa, Shenzhen’s still-unopened Ping An Finance Center, Eero Saarinen’s Gateway Arch, the International Space Station, the Great Pyramid of Giza; the Palace of Fine Arts; Hoover Dam; Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater, and—for the kids, perhaps—the Six Flags American Eagle Roller Coaster and the Cinderella Castle from Disney World. All told, it represents 2,500 hours of design and construction work, done without computer-modeling. That’s more than one year of 40-hour work weeks. (read more)

via WIRED

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Leo Burnett Built a Livable Model of Van Gogh’s ‘Bedroom’ That You Can Rent on Airbnb

Adweek:

The Art Institute of Chicago’s latest exhibit, opening Feb. 14, brings together all three versions of Van Gogh’s “The Bedroom” for the first time in North America. To commemorate the exhibit, Burnett in Chicago worked with the museum (and media agency Spark) to build a full-scale, livable model of the work in a historical downtown Chicago building.

“We thought the best way to help people understand Van Gogh’s life was to invite them to spend a night in this room,” said Burnett associate creative director Pete Lefebvre.

I’ve been saying for a while that brand collaborations, facilitated by agencies are going to be part of our future. Who better to matchmake brands in an entirely new way than agencies after all? h/t Leo Burnett. Jealous.

Your Enemy Is Dirt!’ And this is how you fight it. - Vintage postcard featuring a ‘giant, clear plastic washtub, with the world’s largest agitator, swirling a kaleidoscope of garments around in 700 gallons of water.’ The washtub was the dominant display in a popular Maytag Co. historical exhibit, Tale of a Tub, at the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry, 1958-1969.