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✅Chicagoland Firsts: The Zipper - Introduced in 1893 at the Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition💡This month, I’m sharing a series of ‘firsts’ which Chicago has given America/world. #WarmTheWorld (at Chicago, Illinois)

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Feeding the Flamingoes leaded-glass window, c. 1892

Louis Comfort Tiffany Living room, Laurelton Hall, Long Island, New York, 1902–57
Exhibited: World’s Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893
Maiden feeding flamingoes in the court of a Roman house
Leaded glass
Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, New York City, 1892–1900
Marks, lower right: Tiffany Glass & Dec. Co. 333–341 Fourth Ave N.Y.
60 x 43 in.
(U-072)  The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art 



Description and image from:  Morse Museum  “Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848–1933) casts the flamingo in at least four works in the Museum’s collection, but the most prominent are the Feeding the Flamingoes leaded-glass window, c. 1892, and a watercolor that preceded it in 1888. A virtuoso glass performance, the Feeding the Flamingoes window depicts materials from hard stone and tile to spouting water and soft fabric (folded, so-called “drapery” glass). Its ambitious design includes plating (multiple layers of glass) and hundreds of extremely small, hard-to-handle bits of glass, particularly in the flowers behind the flamingoes. In the two related works—composed on a diagonal axis to create shadow and even a hint of mystery—Tiffany is clearly telling us that the virginal young lady he has placed in this picturesque scene is, like the flamingo, beautiful, balanced, and graceful. The pink in her cheeks reveals her health just as the pink of flamingoes reflects theirs. The well-traveled Tiffany was understandably enamored of this elegant wading bird he no doubt knew from parts of Africa, southern Asia, and southern Europe—exotic places that inspired the artist throughout his life. He even kept stuffed flamingoes in his studio in New York City. Both the window and watercolor were exhibited at the world’s fair in Chicago in 1893 and eventually came home to the artist’s country estate, Laurelton Hall.” (morse museum)



Related post:   HERE



6

Screenshots from The Great Ziegfeld, 1936.

Florenz Ziegfeld, the world famous showman and stage producer, was born and raised in Chicago - getting his start in show business promoting the strongman, Sandow, at the Columbian Exposition of 1893. 

This film is the first where I have have seen the World’s Fair recreated. It’s worth watching the beginning 20 minutes of the film to see (albeit stylized) recreations of the exposition’s sights and sounds.

Federico del Campo - Beach at Capri - 1884

Capri is an island located in the Tyrrhenian Sea off the Sorrentine Peninsula, on the south side of the Gulf of Naples in the Campania region of Italy. The main town Capri that is located on the island shares the name. It has been a resort since the time of the Roman Republic.
Some of the main features of the island include the following: the Marina Piccola (the little harbour), the Belvedere of Tragara (a high panoramic promenade lined with villas), the limestone crags called sea stacks that project above the sea (the Faraglioni), the town of Anacapri, the Blue Grotto (Grotta Azzurra), and the ruins of the Imperial Roman villas.

During the later half of the 19th century, Capri became a popular resort for European artists, writers and other celebrities. The book that spawned the 19th century fascination with Capri in France, Germany, and England was Entdeckung der blauen Grotte auf der Insel Capri, ‘Discovery of the Blue Grotto on the Isle of Capri’, by the German painter and writer August Kopisch, in which he describes his 1826 stay on the island and his (re)discovery of the Blue Grotto.

Federico del Campo (1837-1923) was a Peruvian painter who was active in Venice where he was one of the leading vedute painters of the 19th century.

Del Campo was born in Lima and left his native Peru at a young age.[1] Nothing is known with certainty about his early studies in Peru. He studied at Madrid’s Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando (Royal Academy of Fine Arts of San Fernando) in Madrid from around 1865. Here he established a friendship with Lorenzo Valles, a history painter. Del Campo subsequently travelled to Italy and painted in Naples, Capri, Rome, Assisi and Venice. During a visit to France he studied new artistic developments in Paris. From 1880, he exhibited works at the annual Salon van de Société des Artistes Français. In 1880 he established himself in Venice.

Here there already was a seizable community of emigré artists, such as Antonietta Brandeis, and the Spanish painters Martín Rico y Ortega, Mariano Fortuny and Rafael Senet. He became good friends with Martín Rico. The two artists worked sometimes together painting the Venetian scenes that were popular with the increasing number of visitors to that city. They responded thus to the large international market for their city views of Venice. Demand for del Campo’s views was so strong, that he painted several views multiple times.
Particularly English tourists were taken by del Campo’s vedute of Venice. This was probably the reason why he moved to London in 1893 where he worked for a clientele of aristocrats and successful merchants. He was represented by art dealer Arthur Tooth who was able to organize a special exhibition of his work in Chicago during the World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893. This success likely ensured del Campo’s comfortable life style. Little is known about his last two decades but it is likely that he died in London in 1923.

Taming the Flamingo (also known as Feeding the Flamingoes), 1888
Art gallery, Laurelton Hall, Long Island, New York, 1902–57
Exhibited: World’s Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893
Watercolor on paper
Louis Comfort Tiffany, American, 1848–1933
Signed, lower left: Louis C. Tiffany 88
35 ½ x 23 in.
Morse Museum, (85-011)
         



Description and image from the Morse Museum:  “Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848–1933) casts the flamingo in at least four works in the Museum’s collection, but the most prominent are the Feeding the Flamingoes leaded-glass window, c. 1892, and a watercolor that preceded it in 1888. A virtuoso glass performance, the Feeding the Flamingoes window depicts materials from hard stone and tile to spouting water and soft fabric (folded, so-called “drapery” glass). Its ambitious design includes plating (multiple layers of glass) and hundreds of extremely small, hard-to-handle bits of glass, particularly in the flowers behind the flamingoes. In the two related works—composed on a diagonal axis to create shadow and even a hint of mystery—Tiffany is clearly telling us that the virginal young lady he has placed in this picturesque scene is, like the flamingo, beautiful, balanced, and graceful. The pink in her cheeks reveals her health just as the pink of flamingoes reflects theirs. The well-traveled Tiffany was understandably enamored of this elegant wading bird he no doubt knew from parts of Africa, southern Asia, and southern Europe—exotic places that inspired the artist throughout his life. He even kept stuffed flamingoes in his studio in New York City. Both the window and watercolor were exhibited at the world’s fair in Chicago in 1893 and eventually came home to the artist’s country estate, Laurelton Hall”  (via: morse museum)


Related post:   HERE



3

L. Frank Baum moved with his wife and children to Chicago around 1891, settling into a home at 1667 N Humboldt Ave. The former actor and failed entrepreneur had moved to Chicago to become a reporter for the Evening Post

After several years and moving from job-to-job, Baum began writing children’s poetry books, publishing a couple with no real success. 

In 1900 Baum released the book that would spawn a wildly successful series, countless stage productions and later a film that would become the most popular and beloved movie of all time, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.

As the urban legend goes, Baum was working in an office building on Michigan Ave, his window looking out directly across the street to the Art Institute. It is believed that his view of the very-brave-looking and regal lion statues, flanking the entrance to the museum, were his inspiration for the character of the Cowardly Lion.

Though the lion story can be disputed, it is generally agreed upon by literary historians that Baum’s inspiration for the Emerald City was the majestic White City of the 1893 Columbian Exposition.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L._Frank_Baum

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wonderful_Wizard_of_Oz