chibook

A few weeks ago over 200 school girls were taken from a small village in Nigeria.

The 223 girls aged between 12 and 15 were sitting their final exams in Chibook, located in the northeastern region of the West Africa country, when a group of abductors stormed the building whilst they slept and kidnapped them. The group claiming responsibility were the Boko Haram, whose name translates as “western education is forbidden” and have ties to al Qaeda affiliates.

Under fire for lack of action, Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan was forced to defend himself over accusations the government initially ignored the crisis and then later downplayed the abduction of the girls;

“The President and the government (are) not taking this as easy as people all over the world think,” Doyin Okupe, a spokesman for Jonathan told CNN.

“We’ve done a lot – but we are not talking about it. We’re not Americans. We’re not showing people, you know, but it does not mean that we are not doing something.”

But after 3 fruitless weeks of searching, western reinforcements had to be called in. President Obama and secretary of state John Kerry sent a team to help with the search — a move supported by the Nigerian President - but received heavy criticism for the exponential amount of time the U.S. government took to intervene.

So long in fact, there are reports another mass abduction has taken place, sparking the #BringBackOurGirls campaign on Twitter. More than 355,000 people to date have signed a change.org petition, that calls upon the world to act to save the girls, including law makers and U.N members. Above are just a few of the celebrity’s said to be supporting the movement.

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