chez us

“jo, an important question: your home is tiny as fuck, it’s the first floor of a not notably large turn of the century home converted into a duplex and has the standard bare minimum of rooms: front room dining room bedroom kitchen bathroom. how and why do you have a room that can be in any sense of the word called a study???”

well, disembodied voice, the answer is very simple. when corey and i moved in we took a look around and took stock of the desk (mine had not yet come into being) and the bookshelves and the perfectly battered third-hand armchairs and put them in the room designated “dining room” and let the front room, the designated “living room”, be full of television and worktable and several tables and shelves of Weird Artifacts.

“jo if i am understanding this correctly are you saying that you do not have a dining room”

no

“do you have… a table”

yes it’s ugly and too large and it’s in the basement

“but you have. two living rooms. essentially.”

ONE IS FOR COMPANY AND WATCHING THINGS ON THE LARGE TELEVISION AND FOR ARTIFACTS AND THE OTHER IS FOR. LIVING IN. AT ALL TIMES. IT’S VERY SIMPLE.

“but do you have a table that you eat at”

we. do not have a table. for eating at. anywhere within the livable house. no.

“JO……………..”

THAT’S WHAT DESKS ARE FOR ALL RIGHT. WHY WOULD YOU NEED AN ENTIRE ROOM FOR EATING IN WHEN YOUR SPACE IS LIMITED. HAVING A READING NOOK AND DESKS ON EITHER SIDE OF THE ROOM IS FAR MORE NECESSARY THAN A SILLY DINING ROOM TABLE EVEN IF IT MEANS IT’S MUCH HARDER TO KEEP FOOD AWAY FROM THE DOG.

“i wash my hands of you and your melodramatic commitment to ~the aesthetic~”

Useful familiar conversational phrases in French:

(Ouais,) Grave ! - I know, right? / Yeah, seriously!
Tu m'étonnes ! - You’re telling me!
Idem / Pareil ! - Ditto / Same!
N'importe quoi ! - Whatever! / Bullshit! (The “te” is quite often pronounced as a syllable despite the usually silent vowels on the end of French words: “Nun-por-teuh kwa)
C'est n'importe quoi - It’s ridiculous / crazy
Sérieux ? - Seriously? Really?
J'étais mort(e) de rire - (Lit.) I died laughing / I pissed myself laughing
Je suis éclaté(e) - I’m shattered / knackered / super tired (Note: can also be used to describe being really high)
J'ai la flemme (de faire quelque chose)  - I can’t be bothered / arsed (to do something
C'est *adj* de chez *adj* - A formula used to really emphasise the adjective used

Ajoutez-en de plus si vous en connaissez !
Add more if you can think of any! :)

anonymous asked:

The sentence,'she can stay at my house' would you write it as elle peut rester chez moi, using the infinitive instead of correct conjuncation or would use put elle peut reste chez moi , with the right conjunation. and does this apply to all sentences like that. e.g. 'elle peut regarder télé avec moi' or elle peut regarde télé

Hi! You never conjugate the second verb because there is no subject to conjugate it for (unless it’s passé composé or another compound structure but this is not the case here) so you would say “Elle peut regarder” and leave the second verb in the infinitive.