cheng ting

Interesting Facts about Yuehua Entertainment
  • Yuehua’s main source of income is film, which is why Jung Jung took part in the film Girl’s Memoir, and it is likely that most, if not all, other Yuehua trainees will star in a film someday. 
  • Yuehua is incredibly rich. SM Entertainment has a market value of ₩57.91 Million, while Yuehua has a market value of ₩58.81 Million.
  • As a Chinese company, Yuehua had few connections in Korea, and have partnered with YG, Pledis, and Starship over the years to get their start. UNIQ trained alongside Winner and iKon in the YG building in 2012. Yuehua artist UNIQ shared a practice room with NU’EST in 2014. Yuehua and Starship both contributed trainees to WJSN. Yuehua now has their own headquarters in Korea.
  • Because of these partnerships, the Yuehua Boys are close with NU’EST and the Starship trainees, Jung Sewoon and Lee Gwanghyun.
  • Yuehua’s first K-pop group, UNIQ, faced difficulties at their debut due to Yuehua not having a Korean branch. Now that Yuehua has a Korean branch and connections with Starship, no such problem should occur with Yuehua Boys.
  • As a Chinese company, Yuehua lacks the age and status hierarchy found in Korean companies. This is why Euiwoong is the leader of the Yuehua Boys, even though he is the second youngest and has the shortest training period. Yuehua artists are also allowed much more creative and personal freedom, and are treated very well by their company.
  • Yuehua chooses trainees that are confident and carefree. This is why the Yuehua Boys volunteered to perform first in the first evaluation of Produce 101, why Euiwoong promised to “become a cooler artist than anyone debuting (in Wanna-One),” and why the Yuehua Boys did not cry like many other trainees did in the finale of Produce 101.

Sources: 1, 2, 3

The story of how the Women’s March on Washington came into being has already been codified into lore. As the returns rolled in on November 8, a Hawaiian grandmother and retired attorney named Teresa Shook created a Facebook page suggesting that women gather to protest in D.C. on inauguration weekend. Then she went to bed. By the time she woke up, 10,000 people had affirmed the plan.

Simultaneously, Bland, founder of the fashion incubator Manufacture New York and an advocate for domestic manufacturing, had a similar idea. She also posted about it on Facebook, where her followership had ballooned after she raised $20,000 for Planned Parenthood by selling Nasty Woman and Bad Hombre T-shirts. “We need to form a resistance movement that’s about what is positive,” she remembered thinking. “Something that will help empower us to wake up in the morning and feel that women still matter.”

It wasn’t long before Shook and Bland caught wind of each other and consolidated their efforts. Soon Wruble became aware of their plan. In her real life she runs Okayafrica, a media platform seeking to change Western perceptions of Africa that she cofounded with her business partner, Ginny Suss (also the march’s production director) and The Roots drummer Questlove. Having worked for years as a white person in a black space, Wruble quickly recognized that Shook and Bland, both white, could not be the sole faces of the protest they were starting to organize. “I think I wrote, ‘You need to make sure this is led or centered around women of color, or it will be a bunch of white women marching on Washington,’” she paraphrased. “‘That’s not okay right now, especially after 53 percent of white women who voted, voted for Donald Trump.’”

Bland agreed, and Wruble reached out to a friend, activist Michael Skolnik, who recommended she and Bland talk to Mallory and Perez. The latter two activists brought Sarsour to the table shortly thereafter.

Somewhere in there, controversy bloomed over the name Shook had floated: the Million Women March, which threatened to overwrite the history of a same-name protest by thousands of African-American women in Philadelphia in 1997. It was Wruble who proposed that they call it the Women’s March on Washington instead, locating their protest in direct lineage with the 1963 March on Washington, the occasion for Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech.

The new coordinators even reached out to the civil rights leader’s daughter, Bernice King, who offered her blessing and shared with them a quote from her mother, Coretta Scott King. Perez read it to me when we followed up by phone a couple weeks after the shoot: “Women, if the soul of the nation is to be saved, I believe that you must become its soul.’” 

“It gave us all chills,” she remembered. “It assured us that we were moving in the right direction.

”What I think she meant is this: Where past waves of feminism, led principally by white women, have focused predominantly on a few familiar concerns—equal pay, reproductive rights—this movement, led by a majority of women of color, aspires to be truly intersectional. (x)

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Hua Xu Yin: City of Desperate Love  ~  Teaser

            “unprecedented love tune
                              rewrite the lovefair word of the ruins
                                                     battlefield of fire turmoil of the law”

vogue.com
These Are the Women Organizing the Women’s March on Washington
The Women’s March on Washington may seem like it emerged out of thin air, but these women have been working around the clock to make sure it happens.
By Julia Felsenthal

“Those who made the trek were among those responsible for organizing the Women’s March on Washington, a mass mobilization of activists and protestors that will descend on the capital on January 21, the day after we inaugurate into office a man who ran the most brazenly misogynistic presidential campaign in recent history, and whose victory has emboldened a Republican-led Congress to wage an epic war on women’s rights.

It’s also an all-hands-on-deck, eleventh-hour, race-to-the-finish-line kind of endeavor, which has required all 10, or 15, or 16, or 20 of its chief orchestrators to work around the clock since the week of the election. This is the type of national effort that the group’s communications czar, Cassady Fendlay, told me could take “six months to a year to plan.” These women had just over two months to pull it off.

The story of how the Women’s March on Washington came into being has already been codified into lore. As the returns rolled in on November 8, a Hawaiian grandmother and retired attorney named Teresa Shook created a Facebook page suggesting that women gather to protest in D.C. on inauguration weekend. Then she went to bed. By the time she woke up, 10,000 people had affirmed the plan.

Simultaneously, Bland, founder of the fashion incubator Manufacture New York and an advocate for domestic manufacturing, had a similar idea. She also posted about it on Facebook, where her followership had ballooned after she raised $20,000 for Planned Parenthood by selling Nasty Woman and Bad Hombre T-shirts.  

It wasn’t long before Shook and Bland caught wind of each other and consolidated their efforts. Soon Wruble became aware of their plan. In her real life she runs Okayafrica, a media platform seeking to change Western perceptions of Africa that she cofounded with her business partner, Ginny Suss (also the march’s production director) and The Roots drummer Questlove. Having worked for years as a white person in a black space, Wruble quickly recognized that Shook and Bland, both white, could not be the sole faces of the protest they were starting to organize. “I think I wrote, ‘You need to make sure this is led or centered around women of color, or it will be a bunch of white women marching on Washington,’” she paraphrased. “‘That’s not okay right now, especially after 53 percent of white women who voted, voted for Donald Trump.’”

The new coordinators even reached out to the civil rights leader’s daughter, Bernice King, who offered her blessing and shared with them a quote from her mother, Coretta Scott King. Perez read it to me when we followed up by phone a couple weeks after the shoot: “Women, if the soul of the nation is to be saved, I believe that you must become its soul.’”

“This is absolutely not just about us having a symbolic march in Washington and that’s it,” said Bland. “It can’t be that way. We’ve helped facilitate the self-activation of so many people. Because when you think about it, especially those first 48 hours when people were just saying, ‘Yes, yes, yes’ - that’s them self-selecting into a movement. When we get together, who knows what we can do.”

Read the full piece here <– It’s very in-depth, if you’re interested in this story check it out!

Photo - Left to right: Nantasha Williams, Breanne Butler, Ting Ting Cheng, Ginny Suss, Bob Bland, Janaye Ingram, Paola Mendoza, Carmen Perez, Sarah Sophie Flicker, Tamika Mallory, Tabitha St. Bernard

Photographed by Cass Bird | Sittings Editor: Jorden Bickham