checkoffs

CHECK-OFF PLAYLIST

So I have decided that to get my self pumped up/ ready for my skills check offs in lab I am going to make a playlist to get my mind right. So every time before I have a check off I am going to make an EPIC PLAYLIST! Because check offs are the most nerve wrecking thing in the world! So this week is the first check off so I will be making my first playlist!! Yea buddy I think this is gonna help me out so much!! HOPEFULLY or its remediation for me!! 

Uncle Sam Says: Eat More Meat!

Uncle Sam Demands: Eat More Meat!

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In his 1932 novel Brave New World,Aldous Huxley imagined a future where people exist solely to support the economy and are conditioned from birth to buy things. Government bureaucrats manipulate the sheep-like citizens with drugs and slogans to make them consume as much as possible. In Huxley’s vision, 26th-century consumers learn that “ending is better than mending” and “the more stitches, the…

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tell me about something good that happened this week

I passed my checkoff in Tuesday!!! Checkoffs in nursing school are when you have to perform a task with your professor watching to make sure you do everything correctly. It’s pass or fail and they have a list of “red rules” that you can’t break or it’s an automatic fail. We had to administer an IV push medication and clean a central venous access device!

Organic Exemption from Checkoff Programs Expanded

Editor’s Note: We originally published the following post on December 31, 2015, when the the final rule to expand the organic exemption from commodity promotion (checkoff) programs was published in the Federal Register. The expanded exemption takes effect later this month, on February 29, 2016.

We are now re-posting this update to include a recorded presentation that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)’s Agriculture Marketing Service (AMS) has made available on its website to review changes to the organic assessment exemption regulations. The presentation includes an overview of the statutory authorities that govern the production and marketing of organic products, the rulemaking process that led to the final rule, and the exemption application procedure. The presentation also explains how the amendments to the exemption will be applied to each of the checkoff programs moving forward.

The recorded presentation can be accessed online here.

Original Post

The 2014 Farm Bill directed USDA to expand the rule that exempts organic farmers, handlers, and manufacturers from paying into commodity promotion (checkoff) programs to advertise, research, and promote conventional products. Under the old rules based on a 2002 Farm Bill provision, only farms and businesses producing 100 percent organic goods and no conventional goods were eligible for the exemption from the mandatory checkoff tax.

Under the new, final rule published in the Federal Register on December 31, all organic products certified through the USDA National Organic Program, whether 100 percent organic or not, are eligible, as are crops and products grown on farms or marketed by firms that also grow or handle conventional, non-organic products.

The new rule becomes effective in 60 days, and applies to farmers, handlers, marketers, processors, manufacturers, feeders, and importers.

The new rule removes a provision previously included in some but not all of the checkoff programs which allowed incidental conventional sales of organic product to retain the exemption. These incidental sales can occur due to State-declared emergency spraying programs, isolated use of antibiotics to treat disease, and use of buffer zones to stop chemical or genetic drift. Under the new rule, any sale into the conventional market, no matter the reason, will count as conventional product and hence be subject to the full checkoff tax.

The new rule retains a controversial distinction from the old rule, providing for the exemption for marketing and product research under a Federal marketing order program, but not for farm production research. The reasoning for this distinction seems to be that while marketing and product research clearly aids only conventional products, farm production research for conventional operations may have some applicability to organic farms even if it is not at all focused on organic systems.

The 2014 Farm Bill directed that the organic assessment exemption is effective only until such time as USDA institutes an organic checkoff program. An organic industry proposal for a checkoff was submitted to USDA this past May and USDA is currently reviewing the proposal.

Among other concerns, the production research issue in that proposal is also ripe with controversy, as the research definition and funding allocations for the proposed checkoff appear to be heavily weighted to industry product marketing research and not farmer production concerns.

It is not yet known when or if USDA will decide to move forward with the organic checkoff proposal. In the meantime, the newly expanded exemptions from conventional checkoff programs will be operational, beginning this March.

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from National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition http://ift.tt/1ooA7dJ


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from Grow your own http://ift.tt/1QpoFVM

from Get Your Oganic Groove On http://ift.tt/1PM9iKK
Organic Exemption from Checkoff Programs Expanded

Editor’s Note: We originally published the following post on December 31, 2015, when the the final rule to expand the organic exemption from commodity promotion (checkoff) programs was published in the Federal Register. The expanded exemption takes effect later this month, on February 29, 2016.

We are now re-posting this update to include a recorded presentation that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)’s Agriculture Marketing Service (AMS) has made available on its website to review changes to the organic assessment exemption regulations. The presentation includes an overview of the statutory authorities that govern the production and marketing of organic products, the rulemaking process that led to the final rule, and the exemption application procedure. The presentation also explains how the amendments to the exemption will be applied to each of the checkoff programs moving forward.

The recorded presentation can be accessed online here.

Original Post

The 2014 Farm Bill directed USDA to expand the rule that exempts organic farmers, handlers, and manufacturers from paying into commodity promotion (checkoff) programs to advertise, research, and promote conventional products. Under the old rules based on a 2002 Farm Bill provision, only farms and businesses producing 100 percent organic goods and no conventional goods were eligible for the exemption from the mandatory checkoff tax.

Under the new, final rule published in the Federal Register on December 31, all organic products certified through the USDA National Organic Program, whether 100 percent organic or not, are eligible, as are crops and products grown on farms or marketed by firms that also grow or handle conventional, non-organic products.

The new rule becomes effective in 60 days, and applies to farmers, handlers, marketers, processors, manufacturers, feeders, and importers.

The new rule removes a provision previously included in some but not all of the checkoff programs which allowed incidental conventional sales of organic product to retain the exemption. These incidental sales can occur due to State-declared emergency spraying programs, isolated use of antibiotics to treat disease, and use of buffer zones to stop chemical or genetic drift. Under the new rule, any sale into the conventional market, no matter the reason, will count as conventional product and hence be subject to the full checkoff tax.

The new rule retains a controversial distinction from the old rule, providing for the exemption for marketing and product research under a Federal marketing order program, but not for farm production research. The reasoning for this distinction seems to be that while marketing and product research clearly aids only conventional products, farm production research for conventional operations may have some applicability to organic farms even if it is not at all focused on organic systems.

The 2014 Farm Bill directed that the organic assessment exemption is effective only until such time as USDA institutes an organic checkoff program. An organic industry proposal for a checkoff was submitted to USDA this past May and USDA is currently reviewing the proposal.

Among other concerns, the production research issue in that proposal is also ripe with controversy, as the research definition and funding allocations for the proposed checkoff appear to be heavily weighted to industry product marketing research and not farmer production concerns.

It is not yet known when or if USDA will decide to move forward with the organic checkoff proposal. In the meantime, the newly expanded exemptions from conventional checkoff programs will be operational, beginning this March.

External image

from National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition http://ift.tt/1ooA7dJ


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from Grow your own http://ift.tt/1QpoFVM
15 'healthy' products you've been tricked into buying that aren't actually that great

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Flickr/Vlad B.

Most Americans say they want to eat healthier. It’s a beautiful (and fairly new) thing.

The problem is, most of us don’t know how.

But the next time you take a stroll down your grocery’s “health foods” aisle, take note: Most of what you’re looking at likely doesn’t belong there.

Here are some of the most egregiously unhealthy products we’ve been tricked into buying:

Beef

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Beefitswhatsfordinner.com

The problem: We’ve been told that beef, which is high in fat and has been implicated in contributing to the California drought because of its large impact on land and water resources, is a go-to source of protein. 

Who’s to blame: The National Beef Board

How it happened: The Beef Checkoff Program, a research and advertising funding pool created by the National Beef Board to stimulate beef sales in the US, came up with the “Beef: It’s What’s For Dinner” campaign in 1992. The campaign featured TV, radio, and magazine ads with ator Robert Mitchum as the narrator, as well as catchy Western music from the “Rodeo” suite by Aaron Copland. The initial campaign ran for a year and a half and cost $42 million. Today, the program still owns and operates beefitswhatsfordinner.com, which features recipes and guides to picking out a cut of meat.



Milk

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America’s Dairy Farmers And Milk Processors

The problem: We were led to believe we need to drink milk to get calcium for strong bones, especially at a young age. In reality, there are a ton of veggies that are rich in calcium, including kale, collard greens, spinach, and peppers, just to name a few.

Who’s to blame: The California dairy industry

How it happened: In 1993, California hired advertising consultant Jeff Manning to boost lagging dairy sales. He brought on ad agency Goodby, Silverstein & Partners, who used its $23-million budget to create “got milk?”, a campaign that began around the idea that people only want milk when they run out. Later versions of the ads emphasized its importance for health, like the above ad featuring actor Frankie Muniz with the text: “Want strong kids?”



Peanut butter and jelly

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Flickr / hiwarz

The problem: The PB&J is a ubiquitous lunch item among American kids (there’s a song about it, folks), but it’s actually a less-healthy alternative to sandwiches made with hummus or lean meats. Peanut butter is high in fat; jelly is high in sugar. Slap those ingredients between 2 slices of white bread and you’ve got a sandwich that packs 20 grams of sugar, 14g fat (3.5g saturated) and 400 calories. 

Who’s to blame: WWI rations officers, Welch’s (who came out with Grapelade), and peanut companies that latched onto it.

How it happened: TheGreat Depression popularized peanut butter on bread as a cheaper-than-meat substitute for protein. When it was combined with Welch’s Grapelade — one of the first iterations of jelly — in the rations of WWI soldiers in the US, the PB&J became an official hit.



See the rest of the story at Business Insider
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