charter-schools

6

(Insp.)

Headcanon: At 14 years old Yang already looked like she was in her 20′s, leading some people to some uncomfortable realizations.

Not gonna lie, I like woke up in a cold sweat a few days ago with this dumb idea in my head, and I finished it off when I had some free time today. I think this is significantly less funny then I remembered thinking it would be. Which is about the usual for me. Enjoy! ✧・゚: *

happy-amateur  asked:

Funny how every one of those senators complaining about how federal power can jeopardize education all voted in favor of Devos. They can't even keep their rice-paper-thin excuses consistent.

I suspect a lot of them are anti-public schools and pro-private Christian charter schools, both of which are in line with DeVos’s own attitudes toward education. 

Mother Jones has a very good article here on the kinds of things that DeVos values and pays for–and the probable results of her policies:

Michigan now serves as one of the most prominent examples of what aggressive, DeVos-style school choice policies look like on the ground, especially when it comes to expanding charters. About 80 percent of the state’s charter schools are run by for-profit companies—a much higher share than anywhere else in the country—with little oversight from the state. In 2011, DeVos fought against legislation to stop low-performing charter schools from expanding, and later she and her husband funded legislators who opposed a proposal to add new oversight for Detroit’s charters.

Detroit, in particular, provides a cautionary tale of what happens when the ideology of market-driven “school choice” trumps the focus on student outcomes. The city’s schools—where 83 percent of students are black and 74 percent are poor—have been in steady decline since charter schools started proliferating: Public school test scores in math and reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress have remained the worst among large cities since 2009. In June, the New York Times published a scathing investigation of the city’s school district, which has the second-biggest share of students in charters in America. (New Orleans is No. 1.) Reporter Kate Zernike concluded that lax oversight by the state and insufficiently regulated growth—including too many agencies that are allowed to open new charter schools—contributed to a chaotic system marked by “lots of choice, with no good choice.”

A 2015 study from Michigan State University’s Education Policy Center found that a high percentage of charter schools also had a devastating impact on the finances of poor Michigan school districts like Detroit. Researchers reported that, under the state’s school choice and finance laws, it was hard for districts to keep traditional public schools afloat when charters reached 20 percent or more of enrollment. While per-student public funding follows kids to charters or other districts, traditional public schools still have fixed costs to cover, like building expenses and faculty salaries. Charter growth also increased the share of special-needs students left behind in traditional public schools, and the extra costs for educating such students weren’t adequately reimbursed by the state.

5

NEOLIBERALISM is that politician who’s just a tad too friendly with big business & Wall Street banks, but not very friendly to teachers and labor unions. Neoliberalism is “socially liberal, but very fiscally conservative

Neoliberalism is for good things like marriage equality, but its also in favor of terrible things like private prisons, mass incarceration, privatized schools, gutting welfare, “means testing” basic social services, and approving the keystone pipeline

Neoliberalism never goes hard in the paint for a $15 an hour minimum wage

Neoliberalism is putting a smiley face on harmful Republican fiscal policies

Neoliberalism is soft conservatism

Principal of mostly black charter school fired for neo-Nazi ties and alt-right alter ego

  • Nicholas Dean, the principal of a predominantly black charter school in New Orleans called Crescent Leadership Academy, was fired after news leaked of his involvement in far-right activities and events. 
  • Dean attended multiple alt-right rallies and appeared in a podcast bemoaning the removal of Confederate monuments in New Orleans, using a pseudonym to hide his identity.
  • Dean was also caught on tape on May 7 at the so-called Battle of New Orleans, a planned fight between alt-right activists and antifascists over the removal of Confederate monuments. 
  • The fight never actually occurred, but Dean nevertheless showed up in armor, goggles, an American flag to be used as a weapon and rings with neo-Nazi insignia like the Iron Cross. Read more (5/26/17)

follow @the-movemnt

Raising teenage girls can be a tough job. Raising black teenage girls as white parents can be even tougher. Aaron and Colleen Cook knew that when they adopted their twin daughters, Mya and Deanna.

As spring came around this year, the girls, who just turned 16, told their parents they wanted to get braided hair extensions. Their parents happily obliged, wanting Mya and Deanna to feel closer to their black heritage.

But when the girls got to school, they were asked to step out of class. Both were given several infractions for violating the dress code. Mystic Valley Regional Charter School, north of Boston, bans hair extensions in its dress code, deeming them “distracting.”

When administrators asked the girls to remove their braids, Mya and Deanna refused.

When Black Hair Violates The Dress Code

Illustration: Mai Ly Degnan for NPR

washingtonpost.com
Trump’s first full education budget: Deep cuts to public school programs in pursuit of school choice
Documents obtained by The Post show how the president wants to reshape K-12 education and college financial aid.
By https://www.facebook.com/danielle.douglas.5245

The cuts would come from eliminating at least 22 programs, some of which Trump outlined in March. Gone, for example, would be $1.2 billion for after-school programs that serve 1.6 million children, most of whom are poor, and $2.1 billion for teacher training and class-size reduction.

The documents obtained by The Post — dated May 23, the day the president’s budget is expected to be released — outline the rest of the cuts, including a $15 million program that provides child care for low-income parents in college; a $27 million arts education program; two programs targeting Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian students, totaling $65 million; two international education and foreign language programs, $72 million; a $12 million program for gifted students; and $12 million for Special Olympics education programs.

Other programs would not be eliminated entirely, but would be cut significantly. Those include grants to states for career and technical education, which would lose $168 million, down 15 percent compared to current funding; adult basic literacy instruction, which would lose $96 million (down 16 percent); and Promise Neighborhoods, an Obama-era initiative meant to build networks of support for children in needy communities, which would lose $13 million (down 18 percent).

The Trump administration would dedicate no money to a fund for student support and academic enrichment that is meant to help schools pay for, among other things, mental-health services, anti-bullying initiatives, physical education, Advanced Placement courses and science and engineering instruction.

These are the cuts proposed in order to spend more on public funding for private schools (which is what “school choice” is a bullshit euphemism for) and bureaucracy. 

4

Be wary of liberal leaders who will try to hide their allegiance to DeVos’ destructive education agenda. As soon as he sad he supports “accountable school choice initiatives”, it should be a dead giveaway.


Behind closed doors, politicians like this will be more than happy to help Devos gut public schooling and destroy teachers unions. They try to hide it, but they can’t hide their actions and their records.

unqualified salmon dip

this salmon dip has never worked in schools, doesn’t know the difference between growth and proficiency, and paid Republican senators millions of dollars to ignore its shameless ignorance and proud incompetency

however, it is delicious and just as qualified as betsy devos is to be secretary of education


ingredients

- 8oz cream cheese (at room temperature unless you want to destroy your mixer, maybe you do, maybe you are as made of money as betsy devos is and the idea of buying a new mixer doesn’t faze you, maybe in that case you should excuse yourself to the bottom of the sea)

- half a cup of greek yogurt (or sour cream, probably creme fraiche would also work but at my house creme fraiche is for eating with a spoon out of the little bucket, not for putting in dip)

- juice of half a lemon

- tablespoon of dill (dried or fresh, probably the amount makes a difference depending on which one you use, but i used dried because I ate all my fresh, because fresh dill is the most delicious thing on earth)

- 4oz smoked salmon, chopped (try not to get the shittiest kind)

- tablespoon of horseradish (i used fresh grated, you can use prepared because maybe you aren’t the kind of person who keeps fresh horseradish around in case they need to make a bloody mary at 9am on a weekday, but maybe you want to be, in which case, i recommend keeping fresh horseradish around)


directions

In a mixer, combine your cream cheese and like a third of your salmon, along with your yogurt, dill, lemon juice, horseradish and salt and pepper to taste. After the stuff is sufficiently infused with delicious creamed salmon and perfectly pasty, dispatch to a serving bowl, stir in the rest of your salmon, and chill for an hour or for as long as you can hold yourself back from consuming this incredible treat in light of the fact that the world is crumbling around us and every moment finds our very existence less certain than the next.

washingtonpost.com
Analysis | Florida governor is signing K-12 public education bill that critics call a ‘scam’ — at a Catholic school
Critics say traditional public schools will be severely harmed by the measure while charter schools get priority.

Florida’s Republican governor, Rick Scott, on Thursday plans to sign a $419 million K-12 public education bill that has been labeled by critics as “scam” legislation — and he is holding the event at a private Catholic school.

The measure, popular among many but not all Republicans and pro-school choice forces, sparked a tsunami of opposition from parents, school boards, district superintendents and unions. They have argued that it will harm traditional public school districts, threaten services for students who live in poverty and curb local control of education while promoting charter schools and a state-funded voucher program.

When the legislation becomes law, more than 100 traditional public schools given low grades by the state will be converted into charters — even though the charter sector in Florida is deeply troubled; more than 300 have closed as a result of poor performance. Charter-friendly provisions are scattered throughout the bill, such as one that requires traditional public elementary schools to provide recess to students (without resources to expand the school day) but exempts charters from the same mandate.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/answer-sheet/wp/2017/06/15/florida-governor-is-signing-k-12-public-education-bill-that-critics-call-a-scam-at-a-catholic-school/?utm_term=.16b4df9b634b

I just sneezed and one of my students said “bless you” and it reminded me of that one time at my charter school we had a PD session about consequences that included giving students a demerit for saying “bless you” when a classmate sneezed because that’s considered talking out.

And then we began sharing tips and best practices for the best way to break the automatic habit of saying “bless you” when someone sneezes.

Other things we’ve discussed while I was there: giving students demerits for saying “thank you” when someone holds the door open for them in the hallway because hallways are supposed to be silent.

What does it mean to declare that #blacklivesmatter in education?

Last month the Movement for Black Lives, representing elements of the Black Lives Matter movement and related groups, issued a detailed policy platform denouncing what it called “corporate-backed,” “market driven” “privatization” in school reform, and helped set off a furor over this question.

Under the section labeled “community control,” M4BL called for an end to state and mayoral takeovers of school systems in favor of local, democratically elected boards, more equitable school funding and a de-emphasis on standardized testing. The group also demanded a moratorium on new charter schools, on school closures and on out-of-school suspensions, which they link to the school-to-prison pipeline.

Questions Of Race And Charter Schools Divide Education Reformers

Illustration: LA Johnson and Chelsea Beck/NPR

I am so goddamn tired of hearing the “let’s just put the money into making public schools better!” argument against charter schools. Charter schools are a complicated issue, especially when it comes to funding, and my position is complex and not entirely set in stone. I also have all the support in the world for public schools. 

But I hate that argument, because it misses the point. It’s not just about “good” schools, it’s also about different schools. While it’s true that there are plenty of charter schools that are basically just regular schools that parents send their kids to because they don’t trust the public school for whatever (sometimes legitimate, sometimes not) reason, there are also a lot of charter schools that are alternative in some way. There are schools with blended (digital/traditional) curriculum, there are schools for the gifted, schools for the disabled and special needs, language schools, arts schools, etc. A public school, even a really good one, is still just one school. It’s never going to contain every alternative model that is best for different students. And that’s okay. The charter school system allows these alternative model schools to be opened when and where there is a demand and with greater accessibility than elite private schools. 

Improving public schools does not eliminate the role charter schools play in education.