chart contemporary

youtube

On this day in music history: February 27, 1988 - “Father Figure” by George Michael hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 2 weeks, also peaking at #6 on the R&B singles chart and #3 on the Adult Contemporary chart. Written and produced by George Michael, it is the third solo chart topper for the British born singer, songwriter and producer. Originally composed as a mid tempo dance track, Michael removes the snare drum from the track while mixing it, completely changing the flavor and mood of the song. Issued as the third single from “Faith” on January 2, 1988, “Father Figure” quickly becomes another smash. Entering the Hot 100 at #49 on January 16, 1988, it climbs to the top of the chart six weeks later.“Father Figure” is the second of four consecutive chart topping singles from the Diamond certified album. Also issued are a 12" single, CD single and CD3, with those configurations including a live cover version of the Stevie Wonder song “Love Is In Need Of Love Today”, recorded on April 1, 1987 by Capital Radio in London. The song is later included as a bonus track on the deluxe boxed edition of “Faith” released in 2011. “Father Figure” is later sampled by PM Dawn for their hit single “Looking Through Patient Eyes”, and by LL Cool J" on “Father”.

It’s Joy Time for Bruno Mars

WE’RE JUST CAVEMEN, hitting on rocks,” says Bruno Mars. “It’s no different—you’re a caveman and you got a rock in front of you, you hit it with a stick to get everybody dancing. This is our time to forget about everything, it’s joy time. So who’s the best at hitting that rock? Who’s going to make the village dance the hardest?” 

At a casual glance, you might not know that Mars is one of our superstar cavemen. Pulling up to an upscale Italian restaurant on an anonymous street in L.A.’s San Fernando Valley, alone in a relatively modest Cadillac, he parks in back by the dumpsters to slip in quietly. In contrast to the flashy outfits he wears onstage, he’s dressed in a simple collarless bomber jacket, a white Gucci logo T-shirt and camouflage pants. A small crucifix on a thin chain hangs around his neck. 

Keep reading

10

Current Billboard standings for this week (March 21, 2015)

1. Billboard Hot 100 #21 (up from 37) ☆☆☆

2. Billboard 200 #1 (hot shot debut) ☆☆☆

3. Billboard 200 #122 (re-entry onto chart)

4. Artist 100 #5 (up from 48) ☆☆☆

5. Billboard Top Digital Songs #21 (up from 32)

6. Billboard Twitter Top Tracks #31 (up from 35)

7. Billboard Top Album Sales #1 (highest ranking debut) ☆☆☆

8. Billboard Digital Albums #1 (highest ranking debut) ☆☆☆

9. Billboard Adult Contemporary #9 (same as last week) ☆☆☆

10. Billboard Adult Pop Songs #10 (same as last week) ☆☆☆

Not Pictured

11. Official U.K. Singles Chart - Heartbeat Song #10 (down from 7)

12. Official U.K. Albums Chart - Piece By Piece #6 (debut) ☆☆☆

13. Billboard Canadian Hot 100 - Heartbeat Song #25 (up from 28) ☆☆☆

14. Canadian Digital Songs - Heartbeat Song #27 (up from 37)

15. Canadian Albums - Piece By Piece #4 (debut) ☆☆☆



☆☆☆ : peak position on the chart

youtube

On this day in music history: April 20, 1974 - “TSOP (The Sound Of Philadelphia)” by MFSB Featuring The Three Degrees hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 2 weeks, topping the R&B singles chart for 1 week on the same date, and topping the Adult Contemporary chart for 2 weeks on May 4, 1974. Written and produced by Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff, it is the biggest hit for the studio collective that serves the house band Philadelphia International Records, and for a number of other “Philly Soul” artists. The song is a track from “Love Is The Message”, the second album by the studio band which at various times contains as many as forty members. The song also features vocals by the female vocal trio The Three Degrees (“When Will I See You Again”, “Dirty Ol’ Man”) featuring Fayette Pinkney, Sheila Ferguson and Valerie Holiday. “TSOP” goes on to achieve worldwide notoriety when it is used as the theme for the hit music show “Soul Train” from 1973 to 1975. Entering the Hot 100 at #65 on March 2, 1974, it rockets to the top of the chart seven weeks later. A second version of the song is included on The Three Degrees album “International” which is an extended version of the track used as the “Soul Train Theme”. The single wins a Grammy Award for Best R&B Instrumental Performance in 1975. “TSOP” is later covered by Dexy’s Midnight Runners in 1982, issued on the B-side of the UK 12" for “Jackie Wilson Said”, and on the B-side of the 12" for “Come On Eileen” in the US. “TSOP (The Sound Of Philadelphia)” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

youtube

On this day in music history: April 15, 1972 - “The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face” by Roberta Flack hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 6 weeks, also topping the Adult Contemporary chart for 6 weeks on April 1, 1972, and peaking at #4 on the R&B singles chart on May 20, 1972. Written by Ewan MacColl, it is the first chart topping single for the singer, songwriter and musician from Black Mountain, NC. Originally written by Scottish folk singer Ewan MacColl (the father of singer/songwriter Kirsty MacColl) in 1957 for his future wife Peggy Seeger (the sister of folk music legend Pete Seeger), while the pair are having an affair, and while MacColl is married to someone else. Roberta Flack at some point hears the song, and begins performing it on evening and weekend gigs at night clubs in Washington DC (during the week she works as a teacher). She also records “The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face” for her 1969 debut album “First Take”. When the album is first released, it and the song attracts little notice. Then in 1971, actor and first time director Clint Eastwood hears Flack’s rendition, feeling that it will perfectly underscore a scene in his film “Play Misty For Me”. He acquires the rights from Atlantic Records to use it in the film. Once the film is released, the audience reaction is immediate and overwhelmingly positive, with people literally going from movie theaters to record stores looking for the song. Atlantic quickly prepares an edited version of the nearly five and a half minute track and rush releases it as a single. Entering the Hot 100 at #77 on March 4, 1972, “Face” rockets to the top of the chart six weeks later. The single wins two Grammy Awards including Record and Song Of The Year, and is ranked as the number one single of 1972 by Billboard Magazine. “The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

youtube

On this day in music history: March 22, 1986 - “These Dreams” by Heart hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 1 week, also topping the Adult Contemporary chart for 1 week on March 15, 1986. Written by Martin Page and Bernie Taupin, it is first chart topping single for the Seattle, WA based rock band fronted by sisters Ann and Nancy Wilson. Making his breakthrough as a songwriter in the early 80’s after co-writing Earth, Wind & Fire’s R&B top ten hit “Magnetic”, Martin Page continues to make the rounds in the music business, when he meets another songwriting legend. Page meets lyricist Bernie Taupin, Elton John’s long time collaborator when Taupin looking for another music writing partner asks Page to work with him. Among the first songs the pair write together are “We Built This City” and “These Dreams”. The former is given to Starship who have a number one single with it. Taupin and Page’s publisher also look to have “These Dreams” recorded by a name artist. The song is originally submitted to Stevie Nicks for consideration. When she passes on recording it, the writing duos song publisher places it with Heart. Featuring Nancy Wilson on lead vocals rather than regular lead vocalist Ann Wilson, Nancy initially records her lead vocals while she’s ill with a cold, giving her vocals a slight raspiness. Though she goes back and re-record parts of her vocal after she’s well, producer Ron Nevison keeps much of the original vocals for the final version. Issued as the third single from their self titled eighth studio album in early January of 1986, it quickly becomes a pop and AC radio smash. Entering the Hot 100 at #54 on January 18, 1986, it climbs to the top of the chart nine weeks later. “These Dreams” is the third of four US top ten singles spun off of the album “Heart” during 1985 and 1986.

youtube

On this day in music history: April 27, 1985 - “Rhythm Of The Night” by DeBarge hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for 1 week, peaking at #3 on the Hot 100 on the same date, also topping the Adult Contemporary chart for 1 week on May 4, 1985. Written by Diane Warren, it is the biggest hit for the family vocal group from Grand Rapids, MI. In mid 1984, Songwriter Diane Warren (“Love Will Lead You Back”, “Blame It On The Rain”, “I Don’t Want To Miss A Thing”), submits two songs for DeBarge, when they begin work on the follow up to their Gold certified album “In A Special Way”. The songs are “The Heart Is Not So Smart” and “Rhythm Of The Night”. The latter is the title track of the groups fourth album as well as included in the film and soundtrack to “The Last Dragon” starring Taimak and Vanity. Produced by veteran pop producer Richard Perry (The Pointer Sisters, Nilsson, Ringo Starr) it is recorded at The Record Plant and Studio 55 in Los Angeles, CA and features Abraham Laboriel (bass), John Robinson (drums), Paul Jackson, Jr. and Dann Huff (guitars) and Jeff Lorber (synthesizers) playing on the track. Released one month ahead of the album on January 29, 1985, the single quickly becomes a smash on pop and R&B radio. The across the board success of “Rhythm Of The Night” also drives sales of DeBarge’s album to Platinum status in the US.

youtube

On this day in music history: April 12, 1969 - “Aquarius/Let The Sunshine In ” by The 5th Dimension hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 6 weeks, also topping the Adult Contemporary chart for 2 weeks on May 10, 1969, and peaking at #6 on the R&B singles chart. Written by Galt MacDermot, James Rado and Gerome Ragni, it is biggest hit for the Los Angeles, CA based pop/R&B vocal quintet. The song is a medley of two songs from the hit Broadway musical “Hair”. The group come to record the song through a twist of fate. Group member Billy Davis, Jr. accidentally leaves his wallet behind in a taxi cab in New York City, it is found by the next fare, who is one of the producers of the musical. He invites the entire group to come to a performance of the show. Enthralled by the musical’s opening song “The Age Of Aquarius” (sung by singer/actor Ronnie Dyson in the original cast), they tell their producer Bones Howe that they want to record it. Howe initially disagrees, feeling that the song sounds “incomplete”. He comes up with the idea of creating a medley using “Aquarius” and the show’s closing number “The Flesh Failures” (subtitled “Let The Sunshine In”). The track is recorded at Wally Heider 3 Studios in Hollywood, CA with members of The Wrecking Crew including Hal Blaine (drums), Joe Osborn (bass),Larry Knechtel (keyboards), Tommy Tesdesco and Mike Deasy (guitars). The 5th Dimension overdub their vocals at United Recording Studios in Las Vegas, NV, while they are playing an engagement at Caesar’s Palace, opening for Frank Sinatra. Released as a single in late February of 1969, the song is an immediate smash. Entering the Hot 100 at #89 on March 8, 1969, it rockets to the top of the chart five weeks later. Coincidentally, “Aquarius” is still sitting at number one when The Cowsills version of the title song “Hair” peaks at #2 (for 2 weeks) behind it on May 10, 1969. The single wins Grammy Awards for Record Of The Year and Best Pop Vocal Performance By A Group in 1970. “Aquarius/Let The Sunshine In” is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

youtube

On this day in music history: March 25, 1989 - “The Living Years” by Mike + The Mechanics hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 1 week, also topping the Adult Contemporary chart for 4 weeks on February 25, 1989. Written by Mike Rutherford and B.A. Robertson, it is the biggest hit for the British rock band led by Genesis guitarist and bassist Mike Rutherford. Formed in 1985 as a side project from his regular gig as a member of Genesis, Mike + The Mechanics consists of Rutherford, former Ace and Squeeze lead vocalist Paul Carrack, vocalist and percussionist Paul Young (not to be confused with the British blue eyed soul singer of the same name), drummer Peter Van Hooke and keyboardist Adrian Lee. The band spin three singles off their self-titled debut album released at the end of 1985. The albums first single “Silent Running (On Dangerous Ground)” (#6 Pop)written by Rutherford and songwriter B.A. Robertson is their first major hit. With Genesis taking another extended hiatus after the hugely successful “Invisible Touch” album and tour, Mike + The Mechanics begin work on their second album in the Spring of 1988. Rutherford and Robertson collaborate again, writing four of the new albums ten songs. Having both recently lost their fathers, both find out that besides sharing that loss in common, that they had experienced difficulty in communicating with their fathers, and had tense relationships with them. During this time, Rutherford and Robertson had also seen the birth of sons themselves. From this discussion, the pair write “The Living Years”, expressing their feelings of regret over being unable break down the barriers between themselves and their fathers, and not wanting that to happen with their own children. Sung by Paul Carrack who also lost his father at the age of eleven, adds another layer of poignancy to the song through his heartfelt and soulful vocal performance. Released as the title track and first single on December 27, 1988, it is an immediate smash. Entering the Hot 100 at #79 on January 7, 1989, it climbs to the top of the chart eleven weeks later. The song receives three Grammy nominations for Best Pop Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal, Record Of The Year and Song Of The Year in 1990, with the band turning in a memorable performance on the Grammy telecast. Over the years, “The Living Years” has been covered by various artists including James Last, Engelbert Humperdinck, Alabama and The London Symphony Orchestra.

youtube

On this day in music history: March 30, 1974 - “Sunshine On My Shoulders” by John Denver hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 1 week, also topping the Adult Contemporary chart for 2 weeks on March 16, 1974. Written by John Denver, Dick Kniss and Mike Taylor, it is the first chart topping single for the folk rock/pop singer, songwriter, and musician born Henry John Deutschendorf, Jr.. Denver is inspired to write the song in the late winter while living in Minnesota. Confined to the indoors because of the freezing weather and in a melancholy mood, he begins to reflect on his feelings as well as the natural beauty of his surroundings, with most of the song being written that day. Working with producer Milt Okun (Peter, Paul & Mary), Denver records the song his fourth solo album “ Poems, Prayers & Promises” in early 1971. The album also includes his breakthrough hit “Take Me Home, Country Roads” (#2 Pop), but “Sunshine” is not released as a single until December of 1973. Entering the Hot 100 at #90 on January 26, 1974, it climbs to the top of the chart nine weeks later. “Sunshine” is instrumental in creating the momentum that propels John Denver into pop super stardom during 1974 and throughout the rest of the 70’s. “Sunshine On My Shoulders” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

youtube

On this day in music history: April 15, 1967 - “Somethin’ Stupid”  by Nancy Sinatra & Frank Sinatra hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 4 weeks, also topping the Adult Contemporary chart for 9 weeks on April 1, 1967. Written by C. Carson Parks, it is the biggest hit for the father and daughter vocal duo. With pop vocal legend Frank Sinatra  and his daughter Nancy both having scored number one singles during the previous year, naturally the idea for them to record together is proposed. Nancy’s producer Lee Hazelwood finds the song “Somethin’ Stupid” written by singer and songwriter C. Carson Parks (the older brother of musician and songwriter Van Dyke Parks). Parks originally records the song in 1966 with his wife Gaile Foote under the name Carson & Gaile, but their version is not a hit. After playing the original version for Nancy, she let’s her father hear it, who also immediately loves the song. A session is quickly organized with Hazelwood and Frank’s producer Jimmy Bowen both working on the record. The track is recorded at Western Recorders in Hollywood, CA on February 1, 1967, completely live with an orchestra and members of The Wrecking Crew backing the singers. Guitarist Billy Strange is credited with writing the arrangement for “Somethin’ Stupid”. Completed in only four takes, all agree that the record will be a hit. Any apprehension about a father and daughter singing a love song to each other go out the window immediately, when it is released as a single in early March of 1967. Entering the Hot 100 at #50 on March 18, 1967, it races to the top of the chart four weeks later, becoming the only father-daughter duet to top the US singles chart. The single also receives a Grammy nomination for Record Of The Year in 1968 (though loses to The 5th Dimension’s “Up Up And Away”). “Somethin’ Stupid” is later revived by singer Robbie Williams and actress Nicole Kidmanm with their version hitting number one on the UK singles chart in December of 2001. “Somethin’ Stupid” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

youtube

On this day in music history: April 7, 1973 - “The Night The Lights Went Out In Georgia” by Vicki Lawrence hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 2 weeks, peaking at #6 on the Adult Contemporary chart, and #36 on the Country singles chart. Written by Bobby Russell, it is the biggest hit for the comedic actress and co-star of “The Carol Burnett Show”. The story song about a murder in a small southern town, and the man (the narrator’s brother) who is wrongly convicted and executed for it, is first offered to Cher. Her husband and manager Sonny Bono turns it down, feeling it might offend her fans in the South. Lawrence who is married to songwriter Russell (“Honey”, “Little Green Apples”) at the time, thinks its a hit and records it herself. The track is recorded in October of 1972 at United/Western Studios in Hollywood, CA with producer Snuff Garrett (Cher, Gary Lewis & The Playboys), with the finished recording being completed in three hours. Released in November of 1972 by Bell Records, the single lays dormant for a couple of months before finally charting. Entering the Hot 100 at #100 on February 10, 1973, it climbs to the top the chart eight weeks later. The song has a long life after Vicki Lawrence’s version falls off the chart. A number of other artists including Reba McEntire also cover the song. It also inspires a 1981 film starring Kristy McNichol, Dennis Quaid, Mark Hamill and Don Stroud, though the plot actually has nothing to do with the original songs subject matter. Country singer Tanya Tucker records a cover version for the soundtrack. “The Night The Lights Went Out In Georgia” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

youtube

On this day in music history: April 15, 1978 - “Too Much Too Little Too Late” by Johnny Mathis and Deniece Williams hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for 4 weeks. also topping the Hot 100 for 1 week on June 3, 1978, and the Adult Contemporary chart for 1 week on May 20, 1978. Written by Nat Kipner and John Vallins, it is the first chart topping single for Mathis and Williams. Having spent most of his recording career at Columbia Records, except for a brief stint at Mercury Records in the 60’s, veteran pop balladeer Johnny Mathis makes a conscious effort to return to the hit making status of his earlier years. Mathis’ producer Jack Gold and CBS Records A&R man Mike Dilbeck suggests pairing him up with label mate Deniece Williams. The two develop an instant rapport and become fast friends. When looking for material for the duo to record, Gold finds the song demo for “Too Much Too Little Too Late” through the British songwriters American publishing company. The track is recorded at A&M Studios in Hollywood, CA and features several famed studio musicians including David T. Walker, Melvin “Wah Wah Watson” Ragin (guitars), Scott Edwards (bass), Ed Greene (drums), Michel Rubini and Sylvester Rivers (keyboards), with Gene Page handling the arrangements. Released in early 1978, the single is an immediate across the board smash, becoming one of the first singles to top the R&B, Pop and Adult Contemporary charts. It is Johnny Mathis’s first top ten pop hit since “What Will Mary Say” in 1963. “Too Much Too Little Too Late” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

youtube

On this day in music history: April 7, 1990 - “Love Will Lead You Back” by Taylor Dayne hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 1 week, also topping the Adult Contemporary chart for 1 week on March 24, 1990. Written by Diane Warren, it is the biggest hit for the singer from Baldwin, L.I., NY. After breaking through in 1988 with her 2x Platinum selling debut album “Tell It To My Heart”, and spinning off four top ten hits, the heat is on newly minted pop star Taylor Dayne to match that success with her sophomore release. Working once again with producer Ric Wake (Mariah Carey, Whitney Houston, Diana Ross), the pair go back into the studio in early 1989 to begin recording. Arista Records chairman Clive Davis hears the ballad “Love Will Lead You Back” by songwriter Diane Warren in 1986 while Dayne is recording her first album. Warren writes the song in a hotel room while on a trip to Russia, but does not have it demoed at the time she tells Davis about it. Instead, she plays it on the piano for him. Liking the song immediately, initially Clive has Whitney Houston in mind to record “Love”, but after Houston declines to record it, the label boss holds on to the song. “Love Will Lead You Back” sits for three years before its recorded. Davis gives the song to Wake and Dayne to record for her second album “Can’t Fight Fate”, along with another Warren song titled “I’ll Be Your Shelter” (#4 Pop, #15 AC), a song originally intended for but rejected by Tina Turner. After the uptempo first single “With Every Beat Of My Heart” (#5 Pop) becomes a hit, “Love Will Lead You Back” is released as the second single on January 15, 1990. Entering the Hot 100 at #55 on January 27, 1990, it climbs to the top of the chart ten weeks later. “I’ll Be Your Shelter” is released as the follow up, becoming Taylor Dayne’s seventh and final top ten single in the US. “Love Will Lead You Back” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

youtube

On this day in music history: April 20, 1970 - “The Wonder Of You” by Elvis Presley is released. Written by Baker Knight, it is the thirty eighth top ten single for “The King Of Rock & Roll”. The song will first be recorded by singer Ray Peterson (“Tell Laura I Love Her”, “Corrine, Corrina” ) in 1959 peaking at #25 on the Hot 100. The Platters and The Sandpipers also record their own versions. Presley records his version live at the International Hotel (later renamed the Las Vegas Hilton) in Las Vegas, NV on February 19, 1970. “Wonder” also features Presley’s long time guitarist James Burton playing the solo during the mid point of the song. Backed with the track “Mama Liked The Roses”, the single is an instant hit on both sides of the Atlantic, peaking at #9 on the Billboard Hot 100 (also topping the Adult Contemporary chart) and spending six weeks at #1 on the UK singles chart. The songs’ popularity in the UK is such, that it is later adopted by the Port Vale football club and is sung regularly at games. The Ross County football club in Scotland has adopted “Wonder” as a theme song by their fans. “The Wonder Of You” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA, becoming Presley’s forty fifth single to reach that sales plateau.

youtube

On this day in music history: April 26, 1975 - “(Hey Won’t You Play) Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song” by B.J. Thomas hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 1 week, topping the Country singles chart for 3 weeks on May 17, 1975, also topping the Adult Contemporary chart for 1 week on March 22, 1975. Written by Larry Butler and Chips Moman, it is the second and final chart topping pop single for the Grammy winning pop/country vocalist. After recording for Scepter Records since 1966, B.J. Thomas leaves the label in 1972 for Paramount Records. Releasing two unsuccessful albums for the label, Paramount is folded into ABC Records by 1974. Reuniting with long time producer Chips Moman (“Hooked On A Feeling”), Thomas looks to regroup and recapture his past success. Moman shows the singer a song he’s written with the extended title “(Hey Won’t You Play) Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song”, B.J. likes it immediately and agrees to record it. Released as a single in January of 1975, it gives B.J. Thomas his biggest hit since “Raindrops Keep Fallin’ On My Head” five years earlier. Entering the Hot 100 at #99 on February 1, 1975, it climbs to the top of the chart twelve weeks later. The single is a multi-format smash, also topping the Country and AC charts during the Spring of 1975. At the time of its release, it sets a record for having the longest title of any song to chart on the Billboard Hot 100, until 1981 when The Stars On 45’s Medley tops it with its forty one word title. In spite of this major comeback, B.J. Thomas again finds himself sidelined by an addiction to alcohol and drugs. Finally regaining his sobriety, Thomas begins another successful phase of his career, singing Contemporary Christian and Gospel music, winning five Grammy Awards between 1977 and 1981. B.J. Thomas also records “As Long As We Got Each Other”, the theme for the long running sitcom “Growing Pains” with singer Jennifer Warnes. He re-records it with Dusty Springfield for the final season of the series in 1991-92. “(Hey Won’t You Play) Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song”  is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

youtube

On this day in music history: April 28, 1979 - “Reunited” by Peaches & Herb hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for 4 weeks, topping the Hot 100 for 4 weeks on May 5, 1979, also peaking at #4 on the Adult Contemporary chart on May 12, 1979. Written by Freddie Perren and Dino Fekaris, it is the biggest hit for the Washington DC based vocal duo. Originally formed in 1966, the first pairing of the duo consists of Herb Fame (born Herbert Feemster) and Francine Barker (born Francine Edna Hurd). They are signed to CBS Records’ Date imprint, scoring hits with “Close Your Eyes” (#4 R&B, #8 Pop), “Let’s Fall In Love” (#11 R&B, #21 Pop), and a cover version of “Love Is Strange” (#16 R&B, #13 Pop). By 1970, Barker leaves Peaches & Herb, having become tired of the road and wanting to spend more time at home with her growing family. Herb also stops performing for several years, becoming a policeman for the Washington DC police department. In 1976, he decides to revive the duo and go in search of a “new Peaches”. With the help of friend and fellow DC musician Van McCoy, he finds singer Linda Greene. For their first effort, they record one album (“Peaches & Herb”) for MCA Records (produced by McCoy and Charles Kipps, Jr.) with one single charting titled “We’re Still Together”. It peaks at #98 on the R&B chart, Bubbling Under the pop chart at #107 in September of 1977. A short time later, Peaches & Herb are signed to a production deal (MVP Productions through Polydor Records) by songwriter and producers Freddie Perren and Dino Fekaris, and begin work on their comeback album. Released in late 1978, the album “2 Hot!” quickly spins off the smash “Shake Your Groove Thing” (#4 R&B, #5 Pop). Polydor Records are forced to rush release “Reunited” as a single when it begins receiving heavy airplay from both R&B and pop radio stations as an LP cut before “Shake Your Groove Thing” peaks on the charts. Released in late February of 1979, the single quickly hits and races up the Pop, R&B and AC charts simultaneously, selling over two million copies in the US alone. “Reunited” is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

2

On this day in music history: May 17, 1986 - “The Greatest Love Of All” by Whitney Houston hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 3 weeks, also topping the Adult Contemporary chart for 5 weeks on April 26, 1986, and peaking at #3 on the R&B singles chart on May 10, 1986. Written by Michael Masser and Linda Creed, the song is originally recorded by George Benson in 1977 for the Muhammad Ali biopic “The Greatest”. Famed Philly Soul lyricist Creed’s inspiration for writing the lyrics in part, come from her own struggle with breast cancer which she had recently been diagnosed when commissioned to write the song. Whitney Houston personally selects the song to record for her 1985 debut album, working with co-writer Masser who also produces the single. The original LP version is actually issued as the B-side of her first single “You Give Good Love”, but is remixed for single release (as an A-side) and is issued in March of 1986, quickly becoming Houston’s third pop chart topper. Sadly, songwriter Linda Creed loses her battle with breast cancer on April 10, 1986, just five weeks before the song tops the pop charts. She is only thirty six years old at the time. “The Greatest Love Of All” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.