chart contemporary

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On this day in music history: January 16, 1988 - “Got My Mind Set On You” by George Harrison hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 1 week, also topping the Adult Contemporary singles chart for 3 weeks on December 19, 1987. Written by Rudy Clark, it is the third and final solo chart topper for the former lead guitarist of The Beatles. A former postman, songwriter Rudy Clark who also pens classics including “Good Lovin’” (The Young Rascals) and “It’s In His Kiss (The Shoop Shoop Song)” (Betty Everett), write “Got My Mind Set On You” in 1962 for R&B singer James Ray. Prior to The Beatles first visit to the US in February of 1964, George Harrison makes the trip across the pond in September of 1963 to visit his sister Louise, who by this time is married and living in Illinois. On his visit, George purchases a copy of the James Ray album with the hit single “If You’ve Gotta Make A Fool Of Somebody”, which also features “Got My Mind Set On You”. Fast forward nearly twenty five years later, while working with ELO leader Jeff Lynne on his next album, Harrison recalls the James Ray song while jamming in his home studio, and decides to record a cover version. Recorded in the studio at his home Friar Park in Henley, Oxfordshire, UK, the track features Harrison (guitars), Jeff Lynne (bass, guitars, background vocals), Gary Wright (piano), and Jim Keltner (drums). Two music videos directed by Gary Weis (Saturday Night Live) are made for the song. One staged in an amusement park arcade that only features brief glimpses of Harrison performing the song, and a second and more widely broadcast clip that features the former Beatle sitting in a study singing and playing, while objects and stuffed animals in the room dance in time and sing along.  Released as the first single from his eleventh solo album “Cloud Nine”, it quickly becomes George Harrison’s biggest hit in many years. Entering the Hot 100 at #66 on October 24, 1987, it climbs to the top of the chart twelve weeks later. At the time “Got My Mind Set On You” hits number one, George Harrison makes history as the artist with longest time span between his first chart topper with The Beatles (“I Want To Hold Your Hand”) and his most recent. That time span is twenty three years, eleven months, and two weeks, beating the previous record set by former Righteous Brother Bill Medley when he hit the top of the US pop chart with “(I’ve Had) The Time Of My Life” in November of 1987. The success of “Got My Mind Set On You” drives “Cloud Nine” to Platinum status in the US.

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On this day in music history: November 28, 1987 - “(I’ve Had) The Time Of My Life” by Bill Medley & Jennifer Warnes hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 1 week, also topping the Adult Contemporary chart for 4 weeks on November 21, 1987. Written by Franke Previte, John DeNicola and Donald Markowitz, it is the biggest hit single from the film and soundtrack “Dirty Dancing”. Previte, a member of the New Jersey based pop/rock band Franke & The Knockouts, is approached by Jimmy Ienner, the bands’ former label boss at Millennium Records and the soundtrack supervisor for “Dirty Dancing” to write some music for the film. Without a record contract at the time, Previte at first turns him down, but Ienner persists and finally he agrees. It is selected for the films’ finale by choreographer Kenny Ortega and Miranda Garrison, along with “Hungry Eyes” which is given to singer Eric Carmen to record. Released as the lead single from the soundtrack in September of 1987, it quickly becomes a smash. Entering the Hot 100 at #73 on September 26, 1987, it climbs to the top of the chart nine weeks later. The huge success of the film and the song drive sales of the “Dirty Dancing” soundtrack to over 11x Platinum status in the US, selling over thirty two million copies worldwide. “(I’ve Had) The Time Of My Life” wins numerous accolades, including a Golden Globe and the Academy Award for Best Original Song. Medley and Warnes also win a Grammy Award for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals in 1988. “(I’ve Had) The Time Of My Life” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: November 4, 1972 - “I Can See Clearly Now” by Johnny Nash hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 4 weeks, also topping the Adult Contemporary chart for 4 weeks on the same date. Written and produced by Johnny Nash, it is the biggest hit for the Houston, TX based R&B and pop singer. Following his success with the top five hit “Hold Me Tight” recorded with musicians in Jamaica in 1968, Nash moves to London in 1971 where he signs with CBS Records. While in London, Nash meets a young Jamaican singer/songwriter named Bob Marley. Johnny Nash records Marley’s songs “Stir It Up” and “Guava Jelly”, earning Marley the income necessary to start his own record label Tuff Gong Records in Jamaica. Nash records “I Can See Clearly Now” in Jamaica with members of Bob Marley’s band The Wailers in 1972. Entering the Hot 100 at #84 on September 9, 1972, it climbs to the top the chart eight weeks later. “I Can See Clearly Now” is covered numerous times over the years, most notably by reggae star Jimmy Cliff who records a version of it for the 1993 film “Cool Runnings”, whose version peaks at #18 on the Hot 100. “I Can See Clearly Now” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: December 28, 1974 - “Angie Baby” by Helen Reddy hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 1 week. also topping the Adult Contemporary chart for 1 week on December 7, 1974. Written by Alan O’Day, it is the third and final US chart topper for the Australian born pop vocalist. The cryptic song about a lonely girl living her life vicariously through the music she hears on the radio, was initially written for Cher, but she passes on recording it. Helen Reddy’s husband and manager Jeff Wald hears O'Day’s demo of the song and secures the exclusive rights to record it. Songwriter Alan O’Day (who scores a number one pop single himself in July 1977 with “Undercover Angel”) remains tight lipped about the songs’ true meaning until the late 90’s, revealing the heroine was “crazy” and had “magic power”. O'Day also takes his initial inspiration for writing the song from The Beatles 1968 single “Lady Madonna”. Released as the first single from Reddy’s sixth album “Free And Easy” in early October of 1974, it is an immediate hit. Entering the Hot 100 at #60 on October 19, 1974, it climbs to the top of the chart ten weeks later. “Angie Baby” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: January 3, 1970 - “Raindrops Keep Fallin’ On My Head” by B.J. Thomas hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 4 weeks, also topping the Adult Contemporary chart for 7 weeks on December 13, 1969. Written and produced by Burt Bacharach and Hal David, it is the biggest hit for the pop, country and gospel vocalist from Houston, TX. Early in 1969, songwriters Burt Bacharach and Hal David are commissioned to write the song as the theme for the film “Butch Cassidy & The Sundance Kid. Initially, singer Ray Stevens is asked to sing the song, but passes on the offer, citing other commitments. Dionne Warwick suggests her Scepter Records label mate B.J. Thomas to Bacharach, and the songwriter approaches him to perform the song. Thomas accepts the offer, and records his vocal in mid 1969. Two versions of the song are recorded, with an earlier take recorded while Thomas is recovering from laryngitis (used on the film’s soundtrack) and the final take used for the hit single version. Released as a single in October of 1969, it is an immediate smash. Entering the Hot 100 at #86 on November 1, 1969, it climbs to the top of the chart nine weeks later. “Raindrops” becomes the first number one single of the 1970’s, winning Bacharach and David an Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1970. A pop cultural touchstone, B.J. Thomas’ original recording is featured in numerous films and television programs over the years, including “Forrest Gump”, “The Simpsons”, and “Grey’s Anatomy”. “Raindrops Keep Fallin’ On My Head” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA, and is inducted into the Grammy Hall Of Fame in 2014.

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On this day in music history: August 2, 1980 - “Magic” by Olivia Newton-John hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 4 weeks, also topping the Adult Contemporary chart for 5 weeks on July 19, 1980. Written and produced by John Farrar, it is the third US chart topper for the British born (Australian raised) pop vocalist and actress. With the massive success of the film adaptation of the musical “Grease” and its soundtrack, pop superstar Olivia Newton-John is approached by film producers Lawrence Gordon and Joel Silver (“Die Hard”, “Jumpin’ Jack Flash”) to make another big screen musical. The musical fantasy titled “Xanadu”, co-starring Hollywood musical icon Gene Kelly and Michael Beck, looks like a sure thing, so Olivia signs on to do the project. However, the over the top script, plus bad advance word of mouth, dooms the films commercial chances before it reaches theaters and is an enormous flop. The soundtrack album on the other hand is very successful, spinning off a total of five hit singles and selling over three million copies in the US alone. MCA Records (the soundtrack’s distributor) also sets a new precedent as it is the first single LP title to be issued with a $9.98 list price. The song “Magic” is written and produced by ONJ’s long time producer John Farrar. Issued as the first single from the “Xanadu” soundtrack in May of 1980, it quickly becomes a smash not only on top 40 radio, it is her biggest hit on AC radio. Entering the Hot 100 at #74 on May 24, 1980, it climbs to the top of the chart twelve weeks later. “Magic” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: October 26, 1985 - “Saving All My Love For You” by Whitney Houston hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 1 week, also topping the R&B singles chart for 1 week on September 7, 1985, and topping the Adult Contemporary chart for 3 weeks on October 5, 1985. Written by Michael Masser and Gerry Goffin, it is the first pop and second R&B chart topper for the pop and R&B vocal icon from Newark, NJ. After Whitney Houston is signed to Arista Records in 1983, the nearly two year long task of recording her debut album begins in earnest. Among the producers selected to work on the project is songwriter Michael Masser, best known for penning classics including “The Greatest Love Of All” (also recorded by Houston for her debut), “Touch Me In The Morning” and “Theme From Mahogany (Do You Know Where You’re Going To?)” (both for Diana Ross). One of the songs chosen for Whitney is “Saving All My Love For You” co-written with lyricist Gerry Goffin (“The Locomotion”, “One Fine Day”, “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman”), a song about a woman having an affair with a married man. The song is originally recorded in 1978 by Marilyn McCoo & Billy Davis, Jr. (also produced by Masser), whose version is only a minor hit. Masser retools the song for Houston and records it with her in 1984, with the then twenty one year old singer delivering an emotional and flawless performance. The track is given a torchy, understated arrangement by veteran arranger Gene Page (Barry White, The Jackson 5), and features a sax solo by jazz musician Tom Scott. Issued as the second single from Whitney Houston’s self-titled debut in July of 1985, it becomes an across the board smash like its predecessor “You Give Good Love”. Entering the Hot 100 at #53 on August 17, 1985, it climbs to the top of the chart ten weeks later. The single will win Whitney her first Grammy Award for Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female in 1986 (also performing the song live on the telecast), an honor made even sweeter when it is presented excitedly and emotionally by Houston’s cousin, vocal legend Dionne Warwick. Houston’s Grammy performance of the song also wins her an Emmy Award for  Outstanding Individual Performance in a Variety or Music Program also in 1986. “Saving All My Love For You” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: June 9, 1990 - “Hold On” by Wilson Phillips hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 1 week, also topping the Adult Contemporary chart for 1 week on April 21, 1990. Written by Glen Ballard, Chynna Phillips and Carnie Wilson, it is the first chart topping single for the pop vocal trio from Los Angeles, CA. Friends since early childhood, the members of Wilson Phillips are the daughters of pop music royalty. Chynna Phillips is the daughter of John and Michelle Phillips of The Mamas & The Papas, and Carnie and Wendy Wilson are the daughters of Beach Boys co-founder Brian Wilson. The girls grow up singing together, but don’t become serious about it until they are in their late teens. They form a group with Mama Cass Elliott’s daughter Owen, but when they find that the vocal blend between them doesn’t mesh, Elliott leaves the group and they are reduced to a trio once again. In the late 80’s, they meet record producer Richard Perry (Nilsson, The Pointer Sisters), a longtime friend of Chynna’s mother Michelle. He hears the girls sing and offer to record them. But when he wants to have them sing poppy dance oriented material, they turn down the offer to work with him. Still believing in their potential, Perry introduces them to songwriter and producer Glen Ballard, best known for co-writing “Man In The Mirror” for Michael Jackson and “All I Need” for Jack Wagner. Ballard and the girls hit it off immediately and begin writing songs. They cut a four song demo which includes the song “Hold On”. Initially Warner Bros shows interest in Wilson Phillips, but when the girls feel that the circumstances aren’t right, they instead sign with the newly formed SBK Records, founded by label and music publishing executives Charles Koppelman and Martin Bandier. Released as the first single from their self-titled debut album in March of 1990, “Hold On” takes off quickly. Entering the Hot 100 at #74 on March 17, 1990, it climbs to the top of the chart twelve weeks later. The single earns the group four Grammy nominations for Best New Artist, Best Pop Vocal Performance by a Duo or Group, Song Of The Year, and Album Of The Year in 1991. Wilson Phillips perform “Hold On” in the 2011 comedy “Bridesmaids”. “Hold On” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: January 24, 1976 - “Theme From Mahogany (Do You Know Where You’re Going To?)” by Diana Ross hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 1 week, also topping the Adult Contemporary chart for 1 week on December 6, 1975 and peaking at #14 on the R&B singles chart. Written by Michael Masser and Gerry Goffin, is the third solo number one for the Motown superstar. The song is recorded as the theme to Ross’ second film “Mahogany” directed by Motown founder Berry Gordy. Gordy taps Masser to write the theme for the film, having penned Ross’ second solo chart topper “Touch Me In The Morning” in 1973. Masser collaborates with veteran lyricist Gerry Goffin on the song. Entering the Hot 100 at #89 on November 1, 1975, it will climb to the top of the chart twelve weeks later. “Theme From Mahogany” is nominated for an Academy Award for Best Song, only after there is a public outcry from many prominent people in the film and music industries when an official from AMPAS (Academy Of Motion Picture Arts And Sciences) issues a statement deeming the song “qualitatively ineligible” for a nomination. The Academy changes their mind and nominates the song, but it loses to Keith Carradine’s “I’m Easy” from the film “Nashville”. Ross performs the song on the Oscar telecast, live via satellite from Amsterdam in the Netherlands. In 1988, rapper Slick Rick interpolates the chorus from “Theme From Mahogany” on his single “Teenage Love”. Mariah Carey and Jennifer Lopez record cover versions of the song in 1998 and 1999 respectively, with Carey’s version appearing on the international release of her hits compilation “#1’s”, and Lopez’s on the international release of her debut album “On The 6”.

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On this day in music history: February 2, 1985 - “I Want To Know What Love Is” by Foreigner hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 2 weeks, also topping the Mainstream Rock chart, and peaking at #3 on the Adult Contemporary charts. Written by Mick Jones, it is the biggest hit for the Anglo/American rock band fronted by lead singer Lou Gramm. Written by band leader Jones, initially the other band members are apprehensive about releasing the song as a single, feeling that the ballad will do damage to the bands’ rock image. But Jones feels that it is the strongest track to lead with, and it is issued as the first single from the bands fifth album “Agent Provocateur” in November of 1984. The single features background vocals by the New Jersey Mass Choir, singer Jennifer Holliday (who can also be hear singing the line “let’s talk about love” near the end), and The Thompson Twins. Entering the Hot 100 at #45 on December 8, 1984, it will climb to the top of the chart eight weeks later. The single will be a huge worldwide hit also hitting number one in the UK, Australia, Canada, Norway, and Sweden. For the US release, part of the initial pressing of the 45 is issued with special custom labels matching the ones used for the “Agent Provocateur” LP. And the single is also issued with the standard red and black Atlantic 45 labels. Some copies of the red and black label pressings also erroneously list the albums’ title as “Graphic” instead. "I Want To Know What Love Is" is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: November 28, 1992 - “I Will Always Love You” by Whitney Houston hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 14 weeks, also topping the R&B singles chart for 11 weeks on December 5, 1992, and topping the Adult Contemporary chart for 5 weeks on December 19, 1992. Written by Dolly Parton, it is the biggest hit for the pop and R&B vocal superstar from Newark, NJ. Having established herself as a megastar in music, Whitney Houston sets her sights on the movies. She is hired to play the female lead opposite actor Kevin Costner (“Bull Durham”, “Field Of Dreams, "Dances With Wolves”) in “The Bodyguard”. Written by screenwriter and director Lawrence Kasdan (“The Big Chill”, “The Empire Strikes Back”, “Silverado”), the screenplay had been floating around in Hollywood for nearly fifteen years before it is finally made. When it comes time to record music for the soundtrack, Houston cuts “I Have Nothing”, “Run To You” and “Queen Of The Night”, three original songs penned for the film, a cover of Chaka Khan’s “I’m Every Woman” and the hymn “Jesus Loves Me”. Whitney is to also record of a cover of Jimmy Ruffin’s Motown classic “What Becomes Of The Brokenhearted”, but is scratched when it’s discovered that it had been recorded by Paul Young for the film “Fried Green Tomatoes”, released while “The Bodyguard” is still filming. Costner suggests that Whitney record a cover of country superstar Dolly Parton’s “I Will Always Love You”. Parton writes the song in 1973 after splitting with her mentor Porter Wagoner. It hits number one on the Billboard Country singles chart in June of 1974. Dolly records it again in 1982 for the film “The Best Little Whorehouse In Texas”, taking it to the top of the country chart again. Producer David Foster re-arranges the song as an pop/R&B ballad, using Houston’s touring band led by musical director Rickey Minor to cut the basic track, with jazz saxophonist Kirk Whalum as the featured soloist. When Arista Records hears the finished track, they like it, but feel that the forty five second long a cappella intro might hurt the songs’ chance for radio play. Their fears are unfounded when it is released on November 3, 1992, becoming an instant smash. Entering the Hot 100 at #40 on November 14, 1992, it pole vaults to the top of the chart two weeks later, making the third highest jump to number one from outside the top ten in Billboard chart history from #12 to #1. The single sells over four and a half million copies in the US alone, driving the soundtrack album to 17x Platinum status, with “The Bodyguard” soundtrack shattering the worldwide sales record held by “Saturday Night Fever”. “I Will Always Love You” also wins two Grammy Awards for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance and Record Of The Year in 1994. After Houston’s untimely passing in February of 2012, the words “The Voice” and the title of her biggest hit are written on her epitaph. “I Will Always Love You” is certified 4x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: April 12, 1969 - “Aquarius/Let The Sunshine In ” by The 5th Dimension hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 6 weeks, also topping the Adult Contemporary chart for 2 weeks on May 10, 1969, and peaking at #6 on the R&B singles chart. Written by Galt MacDermot, James Rado and Gerome Ragni, it is biggest hit for the Los Angeles, CA based pop/R&B vocal quintet. The song is a medley of two songs from the hit Broadway musical “Hair”. The group come to record the song through a twist of fate. Group member Billy Davis, Jr. accidentally leaves his wallet behind in a taxi cab in New York City, it is found by the next fare, who is one of the producers of the musical. He invites the entire group to come to a performance of the show. Enthralled by the musical’s opening song “The Age Of Aquarius” (sung by singer/actor Ronnie Dyson in the original cast), they tell their producer Bones Howe that they want to record it. Howe initially disagrees, feeling that the song sounds “incomplete”. He comes up with the idea of creating a medley using “Aquarius” and the show’s closing number “The Flesh Failures” (subtitled “Let The Sunshine In”). The track is recorded at Wally Heider 3 Studios in Hollywood, CA with members of The Wrecking Crew including Hal Blaine (drums), Joe Osborn (bass),Larry Knechtel (keyboards), Tommy Tesdesco and Mike Deasy (guitars). The 5th Dimension overdub their vocals at United Recording Studios in Las Vegas, NV, while they are playing an engagement at Caesar’s Palace, opening for Frank Sinatra. Released as a single in late February of 1969, the song is an immediate smash. Entering the Hot 100 at #89 on March 8, 1969, it rockets to the top of the chart five weeks later. Coincidentally, “Aquarius” is still sitting at number one when The Cowsills version of the title song “Hair” peaks at #2 (for 2 weeks) behind it on May 10, 1969. The single wins Grammy Awards for Record Of The Year and Best Pop Vocal Performance By A Group in 1970. “Aquarius/Let The Sunshine In” is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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Current Billboard standings for this week (March 21, 2015)

1. Billboard Hot 100 #21 (up from 37) ☆☆☆

2. Billboard 200 #1 (hot shot debut) ☆☆☆

3. Billboard 200 #122 (re-entry onto chart)

4. Artist 100 #5 (up from 48) ☆☆☆

5. Billboard Top Digital Songs #21 (up from 32)

6. Billboard Twitter Top Tracks #31 (up from 35)

7. Billboard Top Album Sales #1 (highest ranking debut) ☆☆☆

8. Billboard Digital Albums #1 (highest ranking debut) ☆☆☆

9. Billboard Adult Contemporary #9 (same as last week) ☆☆☆

10. Billboard Adult Pop Songs #10 (same as last week) ☆☆☆

Not Pictured

11. Official U.K. Singles Chart - Heartbeat Song #10 (down from 7)

12. Official U.K. Albums Chart - Piece By Piece #6 (debut) ☆☆☆

13. Billboard Canadian Hot 100 - Heartbeat Song #25 (up from 28) ☆☆☆

14. Canadian Digital Songs - Heartbeat Song #27 (up from 37)

15. Canadian Albums - Piece By Piece #4 (debut) ☆☆☆



☆☆☆ : peak position on the chart

TAYLOR SWIFT’S “WILDEST DREAMS” OFFICIALLY TAKES #1 AT POP, HOT AC RADIO

Following in the footsteps of the previous four “1989” singles, Taylor Swift’s “Wildest Dreams” reaches #1 at pop and hot adult contemporary radio.

Last week, Taylor Swift’s “Wildest Dreams” ranked as the runner-up on Mediabase’s pop and hot adult contemporary radio charts.

This week, it earns the #1 spot on both listings.

Spun ~18,751 times during the official October 18-24 tracking week (+721), “Wildest Dreams” ascends to #1 on the Mediabase pop chart. It seizes the throne from Justin Bieber’s “What Do You Mean?,” which slips to #2 this week. Bieber’s tune received ~17,913 weekly plays (-632).

The Weeknd’s “The Hills” (#3, = | ~17,319, +1), Shawn Mendes’ “Stitches” (#4, = | ~16,420, +1,567), and R. City’s “Locked Away (featuring Adam Levine)” (#5, = | ~11,318, -3,431) complete pop’s weekly Top 5.

“Wildest Dreams” concurrently received ~6,929 tracking week spins at Hot AC radio, where it takes the crown from X Ambassadors’ “Renegades.” That song, which reigned for two weeks, falls to #2 courtesy its ~6,686 weekly plays (+59).

R. City’s “Locked Away (featuring Adam Levine)” (#3, = | ~6,486, +66), Elle King’s “Ex’s and Oh’s (#4, = | ~6,246, +419), and Meghan Trainor’s “Like I’m Gonna Lose You (featuring John Legend)” (#5, +2 | ~5,122, +621) complete the Top 5.

“Wildest Dreams” is the fifth single from Taylor Swift’s “1989” — and the fifth to reach #1 at both radio formats.

— “Wildest Dreams,” additionally claims a Top 10 position at adult contemporary radio and what should be a Top 25 position at rhythmic radio (due to Fetty Wap’s “My Way” going recurrent).

me: I need you more than want you… and I want you for all time

him: wow that’s so romantic baby you have such a way with words

me: actually that’s a lyric from the country song Wichita Lineman by Glen Campbell and written by songwriter Jimmy Webb in 1968. Campbell’s version, which appeared on his 1968 album of the same name, reached #3 on the U.S. pop chart, remaining in the Top 100 for 15 weeks. In addition, the song also topped the American country music chart for two weeks, and the adult contemporary chart for six weeks.[2] It was certified gold by the RIAA in January 1969.[3] The song reached #7 in the UK. In Canada, the single also topped both the RPM national and country singles charts.[4][5]In 2010, Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the “500 Greatest Songs of All Time” ranked “Wichita Lineman” at #195.[6] It has been referred to as “the first existential country song”.[7] British music journalist Stuart Maconie called it “the greatest pop song ever composed”;[8] and the BBC referred to it as “one of those rare songs that seems somehow to exist in a world of its own – not just timeless but ultimately outside of modern music”.[9]