charles darwin and the tree of life

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Tiny notebooks for handbags. Pens for scale. All notebooks are fountain pen friendly and are less than A5 size.

Clockwise from top left:

  • Paperblanks Morris Windrush in Micro format
  • Rhodia No. 12 lined
  • Apica note book
  • Field Notes kraft
  • Paperblanks Darwin, Tree of Life in Mini format
  • Kokuyo Campus B size

Happy birthday to Charles Darwin! The famed naturalist was born on this day in 1809. 

Happiest at home with his notebooks and his microscope, he shunned the public eye. Controversy made him ill. This brilliant observer of nature kept his most original and revolutionary idea under wraps for decades. Yet today, two centuries after Charles Darwin’s birth, nearly everyone knows his name. What did Darwin do, and why does he still matter so much?

Learn more about this compelling figure in our online exhibition, Darwin

Darwin published only one tree of life in his lifetime, a foldout that appears in On The Origin of Species. But Darwin drew many trees over his career, including this one for primates, the last one he was known to produce, dated April 21, 1868. Learn more about these trees. 

Did you know? We may have Darwin’s children to thank for the surviving handwritten pages of the naturalist’s On the Origin of Species manuscript. Most of the original 600 pages are lost, and of the 45 pages that exist today, many were repurposed by Darwin’s brood of 10 children as art supplies! Read more.

Finally, the AMNH Darwin Manuscripts Project is a historical and textual edition of Charles Darwin’s scientific manuscripts. The database at its core catalogues some 96,000 pages of Darwin scientific manuscripts. Check it out

Charles Darwin published only one tree of life in his lifetime, a foldout that appears in On The Origin of Species. But Darwin drew many trees over his career, including this one for primates, the last one he was known to produce, dated April 21, 1868. Scholars suspect that Darwin, not a skilled draftsman, was likely using his trees as a tool for working out relationships in his own mind—a form of thinking out loud. 

“I think it was one step beyond doodling,” says J. David Archibald, author of Aristotle’s Ladder, Darwin’s Tree: The Evolution of Visual Metaphors for Biological Order. “Darwin was a terrible artist, but a wonderful writer. His work led to an explosion of evolutionary trees. Evolution took over the iconography of trees and the non-evolutionists stopped using them.”

Read the full story on the Museum blog. 

awonderousthing  asked:

I was wondering if you had download links for any of Attenborough's other documentaries (or any for that matter)?

Planet Earth 2006 (torrent) 11 episodes.
regular downloads:

ep1 720p prt1 prt2 / ep2 720p prt1 prt2 / ep3 720p prt1 prt2

ep4 720p prt1 prt2 / ep5 720p prt1 prt2 / ep6 720p prt1 prt2

ep7 720p prt1 prt2 / ep8 720p prt1 prt2 / ep9 720p prt1 prt2

ep10 720p prt1 prt 2 / ep11 720p prt1 prt2

I couldn't find regular size download for eps 6,7,10 & 11.

Charles Darwin and the Tree of Life 2009 (torrent) (download)

First Life 2010 ep1 ep2

The Natural World these are just random episodes since there’s 31 seasons I could only find a few episodes.

A Boy among Polar Brears / Africa’s Desert Garden / Invasion of the Crocodiles / Saved by Dolphins / Elephant Nomads of the Namib Desert / Great White Shark - A Living Legend / Polar Bears and Grizzlies: Bears on Top of the World / Black Mamba, White WitchA Killer Whale Called LunaThe Wild Places of EssexForest Elephants - Rumbles in the JungleEcho - An Unforgettable ElephantAfrica’s Dragon MountainsThe Dolphins of Shark BayChimps of the Lost GorgeA Tiger Called Broken TailOne Million Snake BitesThe Last Grizzly of Paradise ValleyMy Life as a TurkeyKomodo - Secrets of the Dragon

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On the twelfth Day of Taxonomy

My true love sent to me

A riotous display of sea anemones!

To ring in 2015, how could we resist the undersea fireworks of taxonomist and illustrator Ernst Haeckel’s sea anemones from Kunstformen der Natur? A popularizer of the then-recent theory of evolution, German biologist Ernst Haeckel helped put Charles Darwin on the map. His 1866 illustration in Generelle Morphologie der Organismen is often cited as the first published depiction of a phylogenetic tree of all life—a map of the evolutionary development of species.

A copy of Haeckel's Kunstformen der Natur resides in the Museum’s Rare Book Collection, along with many classics of scientific classification. Satisfy your taxonomy craving on the Shelf Life website, and see more beautiful oceanic illustrations in the new book from Museum Curator Melanie Stiassny, Opulent Oceans

We hope you enjoyed the Twelve Days of Taxonomy–Happy New Year!