chapultepec-castle

Malachite Doors at Chapultepec Castle, Mexico. Made from Russian malachite.

 In 1775 Viceroy  of New Spain Bernardo de Gálvez ordered the construction of a country house for himself at the highest point of Chapultepec Hill.  The site of the hill was a sacred place for Aztecs. Chapultepec Castle is one of only two Royal Castles in the Americas, as well as the only one in North America that was used to house sovereigns: the Mexican Emperor Maximilian I, and his consort Empress Carlota, during the Second Mexican Empire. The Emperor brought from Europe countless pieces of furniture, objets d'art and other fine household items that are exhibited to this day.

Chapultepec castle has some of the world’s most spectacular examples of  russian malachite

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Castillo de Chapultepec - Mexico City
Mexico - 2015

Located at the center of the park of Chapultepec is a one of a kind castle that has continued to withstand the test of time though the decades of change in Mexican history. Having served as the home for past presidents and emperor for Mexico, this castle has also seen its wall converted into a Military Academy and presently serving as a museum for our rich history. The site is one of the most visited in Mexico City due in large part to its location but also history and view that it offers of Paseo de la Reforma, one of the most iconic streets in Latin America. 

Mexican Independence Day

September is an especially patriotic month for México.

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It begins with the commemoration of the Niños Heroes (Boy Heroes) on September 13th. Our little school had “la mañanita Mexicana” on  the 13th (which is also the anniversary of the Congress of Chilpancingo or Anahuac when México declared itself independent from Spain in 1813) and in addition to the typical traditions, honored those cadets that…

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Miniature souvenir photographs from Chapultepec, unknown date.

From Historvius

Chapultepec Castle (Castillo de Chapultepec) is an eighteenth century building in Mexico City’s Chapultepec Park now containing Mexico’s National History Museum (Museo Nacional de Historia).

Original construction of Chapultepec Castle began in 1785, but it was only completed after Mexico achieved independence and later refurbished as the home of Emperor Maximilian of Habsburg in 1864, before becoming the residence of Mexico’s presidents. Parts of Chapultepec Castle are still dedicated to their time as Emperor Maximilian’s home, however today, most of Chapultepec Castle is dedicated to the National History Museum.

Within its twelve halls, Mexico’s National History Museum charts the country’s diverse history, from the Pre-Hispanic era through to Spanish colonialism, Mexico’s revolution and its independence. Some of the National History Museum’s most significant exhibitions include the sword wielded by independence fighter José María Morelos in the Siege of Cuautla in 1812 as well as several murals depicting famous battles.