change letters

My personal favorite LGBT memes:

  • “Harold, they’re lesbians”
  • “[Anything completely irrelevant to the LGBT community but happens to be enjoyed by many LGBT people] is gay culture”
  • “I’m not heterophobic I have a straight friend”
  • Acting like Macklemore is the savior of the LGBT community
  • Insisting the Babadook is gay
  • Posts that exaggerate how straight people write gay people (But let’s be real is it really exaggerating?)
  • “6 months on HRT” [Picture of something unrelated] “vs 4 years on HRT” [Picture of something vaguely similar but drastically different]
  • “There are only two genders” [Two pictures that are completely unrelated to gender]
  • “LGBT stands for:” [One or all the letters are changed to completely irrelevant things. Notably if one letter is changed it’s usually the T, or even the B]. (Example: “LGBT stands for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, uhh… Transformers…”)
  • Using football as a way to reference straight people without outright saying it, as if you’re too hesitant to say “straight/heterosexual” out loud

Honestly all of them are good but I can’t be here all day

I’m not the person that I used to be. None of my exes would be able to identify me. I’ve grown flowers in a garden once filled with tainted soil. I think differently, I love differently, I fuck differently, I express myself differently. And I drink a hell of a lot more. I am more courageous about taking risks with my time and my future. I am softer to strangers and those I hold dearest. I am more optimistic even though I know I will always be a realist at heart.

Despite all of the growth, I am not yet the person I want to be. I will plant many more seeds in my garden of growth. I will embrace compassion. I will strive for empathy. I will take more time to be understanding. I will allow myself moments of reflection on the ways I have grown, but only long enough to grant myself the inspiration to become who I want to be.

—  the garden of my being

It’s been almost two years since we last updated Tumblr’s terms and policies. A lot has happened since then!

To make sure these documents fully reflect our product and philosophies, and are as understandable and up-to-date as they can be, our Legal and Policy teams have taken the last few weeks (and a tremendous amount of care) to update our Terms of Service, Privacy Policy, and Community Guidelines.

There are a fair number of changes, so we insist you read them all for yourself. Some notable updates include:

  • Cleanup to make all of the documents more readable
  • Updates to reflect changes to our products over the last two years
  • Information about how we work with our new parent company, Yahoo
  • Credits for open source projects
  • Some language that makes it easier for U.S. government organizations to blog on Tumblr
  • An attribution policy reminding people not to be jerks
  • Updated annotations (!)

You can review the drafts via the links above. You can also see every change, letter for letter, on GitHub (minus the plain English annotations).

We’re planning to officially launch the new terms soon and we’d really love to hear any questions or concerns. Please write to policy@tumblr.com.

When magic starts to return to the modern world, barely anyone notices. It doesn’t look anything like what we imagine. People don’t suddenly start developing magic powers, casting spells, or turning into elves and dwarves. In fact, people don’t really change at all, not at first.  It turns out that the magic isn’t even here for us. It’s here for what we’ve built. 

The change is slow, and subtle, and strange, as the magic works its way into our institutions. You mail letters to dead relatives, and the post office starts delivering their replies. Late-night bus routes stop at places never seen on any atlas. Libraries suddenly include subterranean archives where you can look anything you’ve ever forgotten, from the names of your favorite childhood books to the precise flavor of your first-ever chocolate chip cookie. 

The people working at these places take the changes in stride. The letters from the dead just show up every morning, sorted and stamped and ready for delivery, so why not carry them? Bus drivers follow the maps they’re given without trouble, and learn to accept even small gold coins as more than adequate fare. Electricians get used to seeing warding symbols in circuit diagrams, while clerks at the DMV find a stack of forms for registering ghostly steeds as personal vehicles, and sigh in relief at finally having that particular bureaucratic headache solved. The firefighters are shocked the first time they see a giant of living water burst out from a hydrant, but after it rescues several of them from a burning building, they decide not to ask questions. They tell their stories to others, though, and soon word of the changes is spreading. 

There’s no single moment of realization where everyone discovers that magic is real; the knowledge just creeps into day to day life a bit at a time, and society adapts. Cyber-safety programs teach people to never accept a file from the electric fairies without sharing one in return, and to never accept their Terms and Conditions without searching for the subsection on Souls, Forfeiture Thereof. Students leave offerings of coffee and boxed wine to petition the School Spirit for lower tuition or exam deferrals. Nurses learn the hours when Death stalks the hospital hallways, and keep bedside vigils in the children’s ward. They bring board games and cards for when the reaper is feeling playful, and well-worn baseball bats for when he isn’t. 

There are problems, of course, like the vicious monsters of blood and fire spawned from age-old hate groups, or infestations of the writing many-mouthed worms that literally feed on governmental corruption, but really, they were already there before the change. Magic only elaborates on what we’ve made, good or ill, manifesting the latent modern mythology underpinning our society. It doesn’t offer solutions to all of life’s problem, but for a few hurting people, guarded by the concrete arms of a neighborhood come to life to protect its community, or flying away on wings of copper wire and fiber-optic cable, it’s exactly the change they needed. 

Never underestimate the creativity (or perversion) of your players

DM gave my character a ring that allowed me to change a letter or drop a letter of a spell I could cast. The spell will reflect its new name. So a spell like Fireball would become Firball (sharp pine needles explode in a radius), Blur became Slur (if cast on a magic user, they can’t use spells with verbal components), Slow becomes Plow (till a field in a minute), etc.

I’m looking down my list of spells after I get the ring to see what mayhem I can cause & I don’t make it past the cantrips before I start laughing so hard I start to cry. I look up at the DM with a huge grin on my face.

“From now on I will only be casting Vicious Cockery at my enemies. It still does 1d4 psychic damage, but instead of insulting them, a disembodied dick smacks them in the face.”

Who you are today could be light years different than who you were a year ago, if people don’t recognize that, they’re probably stuck in the same ways they’ve always been in. And that my dear is when you run, if people don’t understand change and hurt and pain and growth, they don’t deserve the chance to understand you.
—  2017 lessons

my bard has a magical item that can change one letter of the name of the spell to alter the spell and the party was in a sort of battle royal/hunger games situation, so we wanted to eliminate our opponents without direct confrontation. I decided to cast “clown of madness” on one of the opposing teams while they were asleep. the point of the item is that our dm has to decide what that new spell does. so after looking through the book she decides that i will summon a small jester that is mad and will inflict others with madness when nearby them. i cannot control him and i can only summon him up to 60 ft away, so i had to get that close to the enemy camp. i cast the spell and a 2ft tall human jester soaked in blood slightly glowing and dual wielding melee weapons appears and screams “whos ready to party” and starts attacking the slowly waking up group. chaos

How To Write A Cover Letter When You Have No Experience

For students who have no fancy internships or summer jobs on their razor-thin résumés, here’s some advice:

1) The first paragraph should say who you are, where you go to school, what the job is that you’re applying for and how you came to apply. It helps a lot if you can include a name of someone with a personal connection.

2) The second paragraph has to connect the dots between you and the employer. Describe how your experiences meet the challenges presented in the job description.

3) In the third paragraph, further describe your personal traits and how they make you a great candidate for the job.

4) To wrap up, say when you’ll get in touch.

5) In most cases, send the letter as an attachment and format it like an old-fashioned business letter with your address at the top, then the date and then the address of the recipient.

6)  Proofread carefully and get someone you trust to check for spelling, grammar and word use.

Read more.

If you ask me why I’m so afraid to love, I’ll tell you about the fact that, just by changing a single letter, loving can become losing
—  Fine line
Masterpost of my favorite journal prompts...

I’ve been getting some asks about my journaling habits, so I wanted to make a list addressing one question regarding my favorite prompts. These always make me feel better! 

  • List 3 positive habits you have and explain why they benefit you. 
  • If you had 2 other lives to live, what would you do with them? 
  • Discuss 3 people who encouraged you and has continually supported you. What qualities do they have that you admire? 
  • List 5 tasks that take up most (or a lot of) your week. 
  • What do you need to protect? 
  • Have you avoided anything this week? 
  • Create a list of books you plan to read. 
  • What do you want to learn to do? 
  • Create a list of movies you plan to watch. 
  • What are you currently looking forward to? 
  • What is your favorite holiday? 
  • When do you feel the most comfortable and at ease? 
  • What is discouraging you right now, and what can you do to move past it? 
  • List 5 short-term goals and explain steps you can take to achieve them. 
  • What is your biggest strength? 
  • What are you totally honest about? 
  • Who knows the most about you? 
  • Why are you proud of yourself? 
  • What would you do with a million dollars? 
  • What is and isn’t working in your life? 
  • What lessons are you currently learning? 
  • Create a gratitude list. List as many things as you can. 
  • What do you stand for? 
  • What moves you? 
  • What qualities do you enjoy about yourself, and how can you continue to develop them? 
  • Explain the best compliment you’ve ever received. 
  • Who are you right now? 
  • How have you changed in the past 5 years? 
  • List positive quotes that you enjoy or find motivating. 
  • Create a self-care playlist of positive songs. 
  • Discuss your favorite movies, books, hobbies, music, foods, drinks, etc. 
  • List things that make you happy. 
  • What are your wildest dreams? 
  • Write a bio for your future self - who you want to become - but write it in the present tense. 
  • Describe your ideal day. 
  • What is the best advice you’ve ever received? 
  • When do you feel vibrant, electric, and alive? 
  • How can you be a source of love and magic to the world? 
  • How can you incorporate more fun and play into your life? 
  • What experiences trigger fear for you? 
  • Discuss 3 times you were proud of yourself. 
  • How does stress emerge in your life, and how can you manage it? 
  • How do you compare yourself to others? 
  • What can you do to make yourself feel calmer and more peaceful? 
  • What are you here to do (what is your purpose)? 
  • What do you no longer need? 
  • What do you know for sure? 
  • If you could start your life over, what would you change? 
  • Write a letter to your teenage self. 
  • What have you learned today? 
  • What would you do if you had no fears? 
  • Write a letter to a fictional character. 
  • Write about something that didn’t happen. 
  • What do you wonder about? 
  • List your favorite sounds. 
  • What are you worried about, and what can you do about it? 
  • What do you have difficulty accepting? 
  • Write about an act of kindness you performed or witnessed today. 
  • Discuss your favorite memory. 
  • How can you practice self-care? 
  • Is there a difference between happiness and fulfillment? 
  • Where do you see yourself in 5 years? 
  • List some of your insecurities about your physical body, and then, for each body part, write down something positive about it. 
  • Create a word map with the word “Identity” in the center. 
  • Focus on a regret that haunts you. 
  • What does family mean to you? 
  • What did you believe about love as a teenager, and how have your beliefs changed? 
  • Describe a moment that changed the course of your life forever. 
  • Write a letter to your future self. 
  • Are you introverted or extroverted? 
  • What does beautiful thinking mean to you? 
  • What are your favorite words? 
  • What is your aesthetic, or personal style, and who or what has influenced it? 
  • What is your favorite way to spend the day? 
INFJ vs INFP: 5 Ways To Distinguish Them

So guys most of the people who are interested in MBTI and Types are often confused about the differences between INFJ and INFP. Those two are the most easy to be mistyped. Personaly I’ve been mistyped as an INFJ but now it’s clear I’m an INFP.
In this post I’ll write some important differences to tell them apart.

1. Judging and Percieving
These types may seem to be the same, but that last letter changes everythings. The INFJ uses Judging which means they are more methodical, they need some restrictions, orders, rules. They work with a plan and maybe they tend to make a to-do list.INFP however, uses Percieving which means they work in a more playful way. They don’t see the importance of so many rules and they want to express themselves, so orders and plans are not their thing. 

2. Cognitive Functions
INFJ = Ni > Fe > Ti > Se                                                                              

INFP = Fi > Ne > Si > Te

The INFJ might be a Judging type, but they are driven by a Percieving function which is called Ni (Introverted iNtuition). Ni is their dominant function and it is about understanding the big picture of humanity. They take in information first and judge or form conclusions second. They percieve information from symbols, patterns etc. After that, they sum everything up and conclude. INFJ see the world for what it means and they fill the gaps. On the other hand, the INFP uses Percieving but they are driven by a Judging function, called Fi (Introverted Feeling). Fi is like a personal compass of right and wrong. It judges first and percieves ideas second. Fi wants to decide based on strong, personal values and it has a powerful ethical code it should follow. INFP wants to decide first and take information later. They see everything in a personaly way (Fi). 

What is more, INFJ’s auxiliary function is a judging fuction, called Fe (Extraverted Feeling). Fe wants to create harmony and maintain balance in social norms and relationships. It won’t be happy until everyone else is happy. However, INFP’s auxiliary function is Ne (Extraverted iNtuition), a percieving function. Ne wants to brainstorm. It sees all possible outcomes and all the options. It jumps from idea to idea, without considering if those ideas have something in common. 

As for the tertiary functions, INFJ uses Ti (Introverted Thinking) and INFP uses Si (Introverted Sensing). Ti is about understanding how and why the world works. It is very logical and seeks consistency. Si is about recalling past experiences and comparing them with the present. It seeks nostalgia and comfort. 

Last but not least, the INFJ uses Se (Extraverted Sensing) as their inferior function which means that under stress the INFJ avoids external stimulation because it is so into its head and it loses touch with the world around it. Also, INFJs might enjoy sensory pleasures (food, alcohol, addictions, sex) when under stress and they hate intense things such us weird smells, tastes, many colours, noises etc. The INFP uses Te (Extraverted Thinking) as its inferior function and Te wants think things through a lot, but without doing anything to make it happen. INFP under stress can also be extremely critical, harsh, overly directive, sarcastic and may be obsessed with fixing errors, correcting others, mispellings, giving orders, grammatical or vocabulary mistakes etc.

3. Absorbing and Mirroring emotions
The INFJ tends to absorb emotions. This means that when someone has a problem, the INFJ won’t just listen, but they will absorb other’s emotions into their heart… They focus on other peoples’ emotions. They actually feel exactly the way you feel. Due to their aux Fe, they know what you feel. They see your feelings more objectively.

The INFP tends to mirror emotions. This means that when someone has a problem, the INFP won’t fully feel the way you do. They do imagine your pain though and they really understand your feelings, but due to their dom Fi, they feel things in a personal level only. They see your feelings more subjectively.

4. Social chameleon or different snowflake?
Yes, both INFJs and INFPs seek interpersonal harmony. Yes, they both avoid conflict. Yes, they both are complex and think in a different way. However…
INFJs are social chameleons. They keep everything balanced and they try to maintain harmony no matter what that means, even sacrifing personal convenience. Moreover, INFJs seem a lot more like extraverts because they need relationships and people (Fe). Many times, when in a conversation, they prefer to change their bodies’ language, tone of voice etc., in order to feel more “bonded” and comfortable with others. They may also change the way they talk, the way they move and they look like people who modify their behaviour depending on who they talk with.

INFPs are different snowflakes. They do care about harmony but they will never sacrifice their individuality and internal values just to fit in. They will not be as they must, just for the sake of the greater good. INFPs advocate for staying true to yourself, even if that means ruining the atmosphere. And it’s not about being selfish, but being real and following your heart and your personal ethics only (Fi). When they love something, they’ll talk passionately about it, even if their opinions don’t suit with others’. They want to help people become their most authentic and true self.

5. Desire to be Understood or Validated?
Although both types feel misunderstood, they feel it in a different way.
INFJs feel marginalized. They fear that they don’t fit in and that others don’t get them in a suitable way. This is happening because while they fully understand other people well, other people rarely truly understand them, due to the complexity of their characters. INFJs do not want to change your opinion or to convince you for something. They just want you to understand what they say, what they think. They don’t ask you  to adopt their beliefs, they just want to be understood

INFPs feel similar. They fear that no one could possibly ever get them, but what they fear even more, is that someone may fully understands them. They don’t really want to be understood, because if someone understands them, it means they lost some of their individuality and now they are the same with others. INFPs want to be validated from others that their motives and intentions are good when it comes to their actions and ideas.

To sum up, both types are highly emotional intelligent, complex, sensitive, altruistic and have a lot to offer to the world. Hope now you can type yourself better and understand the things that tell them apart, in order to be a better person..

this is kinda crappy bc I wrote it at 5 am but enjoy!


It all started one cloudy afternoon in the shared 8th year common room. Harry was sitting on the couch facing the fire, Ron beside him, and Hermione on the floor. All working on a massive seventeen inch potions essay that had been assigned to them.

An faint banging noise was heard. The trio looked up and saw an owl outside the window closest to them, scroll tied around its leg.

“Well, there’s no use for all of us to get up.” Ron stated, looking from Hermione to Harry. The boys seemed to have entered some sort of staring contest, neither of them wanting to go open up the window.

“Oh, for goodness sake.” Hermione muttered under her breath before getting up and letting the owl swoop into the room. It landed on Harry’s knee. His face scrunched up in confusion. But I never get mail. Harry took the scroll off of the owls leg and it flew back out the open window, which Hermione then closed and sat back down again.

He shot looks at Hermione and Ron, who looked just as confused as he did, as he unrolled the parchment and read the letter written in neat handwriting.

Keep reading

Why Icelandic is Easy to Learn

There seems to be this idea out there that the Icelandic language is an incredibly difficult language for English speakers to learn, so when I first started studying it I was a bit nervous. However, although I still haven’t been studying it for very long, I’ve yet to run across anything that’s scared me off, and quite a bit that actually makes it quite easy to pick up as a native English speaker. So to cast off some of the stigma, here are some things that make Icelandic easy to learn (or at least not as horrifying as I’d been led to believe):

Spelling is very consistent. Icelandic spelling is mostly phonetic, where each letter represents only one sound. While there are a few instances where letters aren’t pronounced exactly the same, the variations are regular so you can learn when they’re said differently instead of just having to guess, and over time they will become natural with practice. French is supposed to be relatively easy for English speakers to learn due to shared vocabulary, but Icelandic beats French hands down in this area.

Most of the sounds are similar to English. Many of the letters are pronounced basically just like English, and while it might look a little intimidating with all the extra vowels with accent marks and so on, most of those are sounds we actually have in English, they just represent them explicitly in Icelandic, which actually helps with the point about spelling above. Here is a great video that very clearly explains the Icelandic alphabet, and as you can see, out of the 14 vowels/diphthongs there are only 3 that aren’t in English. So sure, there are some sounds that aren’t in English, but that’s going to happen in almost any language, and Icelandic doesn’t seem to be any worse in this area than German, for example. In fact, if you know both German and English, you’re pretty much set when it comes to Icelandic phonemes.

The stress is always the same. In Icelandic words are always pronounced with the stress on the first syllable. In Spanish, for example, the stress changes based on which letters a word ends with and whether or not there are any accent marks, so you have to learn those rules and then memorize each exception so you know where to put the accent, and it can be a little tricky. In Icelandic there is only one rule that never changes, making it super simple.

There are only four cases. Okay, if you’ve never studied a language with cases before, having any at all can be a bit daunting coming from English since we don’t really use them much, but if you’re going to learn a language with cases only having four is pretty great! It’s the same number of cases as German has, and waaay better than Slavic languages that can have six or seven, and there are other languages which have even more.

There are only three new characters to learn. A lot of people seem to be intimidated by the special characters Ðð, Þþ, and Ææ, but if you compare those three measly characters to languages like Greek, Russian, Arabic, or even Japanese – which has two separate syllabaries on top of thousands of kanji to learn – you can see how it’s nothing at all. Best of all, those characters represent sounds that already exist in English, so you can easily learn how to pronounce them. Ð is pronounced as the ‘th’ in ‘breathe’, Þ as the ‘th’ in ‘breath’, and æ as the ‘i’ in ‘hi’. In fact, if you want to say “Hi!” in Icelandic it’s exactly the same: “Hæ!” Similarly, “Bye!” is “Bæ!” You can see too how the spelling here is consistent in Icelandic, using only one character to represent the same sound, while in English we use ‘i’ in one word and ‘ye’ in the other, and in other words we might use even more spellings for the same sound, such as ‘ai’ or ‘y’, or even ‘igh’ (like in ‘sigh’). So even though you do have to learn a few new characters, it’s hardly any, and once you’ve learned them it actually makes Icelandic much easier to read and spell than it would be without them.

A lot of vocab comes from the same Germanic roots as English words. While English has borrowed a bunch of vocab from Latin languages, it still contains many words that come from its Germanic origins, which it shares with Icelandic. You’ve already seen hæ and bæ, and there’s also halló (hello), dóttir (daughter), móðir (mother), hér (here), frá (from), takk (thanks), heitt (hot), kalt (cold), hjálp (help), fiskur (fish), nót (net), undir (under), mús (mouse), and many more.

Basic grammar is very similar to English. Like I’ve said, I haven’t been studying long so I’m sure there’s more complicated stuff coming up, but in the basics I’ve run across so far the word order is so similar to English that you can pretty much take an English sentence and switch out the English words for their Icelandic versions and have a correct sentence. Some examples:

  • I am…
  • Ég er…
  • You are… 
  • Þú ert…
  • I am from Canada.
  • Ég er frá Kanada.
  • Are you from Iceland?
  • Ert þú frá Íslandi?
  • I am not from Spain.
  • Ég er ekki frá Spáni.
  • They come from Japan.
  • Þau koma frá Japan.

I don’t know about you, but the above doesn’t seem so difficult to me. Even if you haven’t learned the pronunciation yet, the grammatical structure is very familiar and many of the words look similar to their English counterparts.

Of course there are difficult things about Icelandic, but there are difficult things about every language. Icelandic is certainly not an impossible language to learn, and there are many things about it that are actually quite simple compared to other languages, or at the very least not any worse. If you’ve considered learning Icelandic, but were hesitant after hearing how terribly difficult it supposedly is, maybe this will show that it doesn’t have to be so scary after all.