cervical dilation

apparently at least 6 dates a day during the last month of pregnancy is recommended by the Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2 studies have similar results showing benefits regarding cervical dilation and labor.
Kind of cool considering the Allah (SWT) gave the same recommendation to Maryam (as) in Surah Maryam, to eat dates to cool the severity of her labor pains.

“And the pains of childbirth drove her to the trunk of a palm tree. She said, ‘Oh, I wish I had died before this and was in oblivion, forgotten.’ ….
And shake toward you the trunk of the palm tree; it will drop upon you ripe, fresh dates…”

This morning a blog post came up on my Facebook by a lady who had her child 7 years ago. The title was something like “why I will never forgive the midwives who cared for me.”
It was poorly written to say the least (if you’re going to reference drugs such as pethidine, at least google how to spell them before you mention it about 5 times in your blog post).
I have written several articles for leading UK midwifery magazines about compassionate care. I would never, ever talk to a woman nastily or belittle her or her body, but we are HUMAN.

The doctors, nurses and midwives looking after you are human. Yes we can make mistakes! Yes, sometimes we might wrongly assess your cervical dilatation, has this member of the public ever even felt a cervix? It’s bloody difficult, we’re assessing for dilatation, effacement (sometimes we’re feeling for a paper thin bit of cervix), sometimes we have membranes bulging, sometimes we don’t. Then we have to feel for the station, for the presenting part, any sutures or fontanelles. It’s difficult. I’m sorry the midwife assessing you only found you to be 1cm when in fact you were 7. We are human. We spend our whole careers learning.

Working in healthcare is the sort of profession where you could have been in the job for 35/40 years and you haven’t seen it all and you don’t know everything. There is always something to learn, always a new technique, a new procedure, a new product, a new concept, a breakthrough or new information disseminating through the medical world.
That being said, just because your care giver looks young, please don’t judge their professionalism or knowledge. I’m 23, I look 12. I take pride in what I do and doing it well. I would hate for a woman or her family to judge me based on something as individual and irrelevant as my appearance as opposed to the brain in my head and my experience.

We work 12.5 hour shifts often without a break or gratitude. We work for little money, despite the stereotype we’re not loaded, my family struggles month to month.
I cannot tell you how wonderful it is to receive thanks from a woman or her family, because it’s honestly so rare.
We work so hard doing everything we can, giving so much of ourselves to help others and to care for others; years of study, poor working conditions… and yet from every angle people seem to want to criticise (including our own government).

I adore what I do. I love supporting women, I love learning and constantly being amazed when I find out something new about pregnancy and birth. There are good and bad in every profession. I have seen bad practice and vowed to never practice like that. But the majority of us try so hard. Please do not paint everyone in my profession with the same ‘evil’, 'uncaring’, 'incompetent’ brush.

We are humans behind these titles of our professions.

“Lightning crotch, also known as fanny daggers, is the nickname given to a sudden and often sharp pain deep in the pelvis or vaginal area. The severity varies but most women find that it feels quite painful and like they’re being ‘punched in the crotch’. ”

So I just had to google 'stabbing pain in uterus’ and this is what came up. Causes may be cervical dilation but most likely baby sitting on a nerve; she’s been causing me shooting pains in my inner thighs for a while now, and since she’s gotten bigger, I assume the affected areas are going to expand.

Man I have had to google all sorts of things during pregnancy.

Am def not going to miss the lightheadedness and blood noses from all that extra blood circulation, these bloody fanny daggers, and certainly won’t miss the back pain!

A pregnant woman

One of my friends used to date an obstetrician, and one day he told her this story (and eventually she told me).

Some years ago, he and his colleagues got a very weird case. It was a pregnant woman - she seemed to be very poor (judging by her clothes, a homeless person) and very old (60-something - of course it could be just their impression, because of the terrible state she was in). She had been brought to the ER screaming in pain, but wouldn’t talk to anybody or answer questions in any way. She was accompanied by a teenager, a toothless girl with old-fashioned, thick clothes. She would also scream all the time, but at least she talked to other people and answered some questions (she said the pregnant woman was her mother), but most of her answers were nonsense (“What is happening to your mother?”, “She wanted to eat my hand”; “Where do you live?, "In a cardboard box, with the corpse”). She seemed terrified, scared of someone or something.

The woman seemed ready to give birth, she had all the signs - painful contractions, x cm of cervical dilation (I don’t remember how many, it’s been some time since he told the story) and, of course, a big baby bump.

But before the medical team could take the woman to the delivery room, she simply dropped dead. As the team rushed to her, still trying to grasp what the hell was happening, the teenage girl bursted out laughing and ran away. The place was a mess, and the guy who told the story said he and his colleagues were trying to resuscitate the woman, so they just let the girl go.

I don’t remember how exactly happened, but the guy said that eventually, he and the rest of the team decided to try and deliver the baby.

He said he will never forget it. He cut her belly open, and immediately saw something glistening.

Inside her womb were dozens of earthworms.

anonymous asked:

Just out of curiosity, when a women gives birth, is it only her cervix that dilates 10cm? Or the opening as well?

Well, Efface Paint, I assume that by “opening” you mean the vagina? Because the cervix IS an opening – the opening from the uterus into the vagina, to be precise.

The cervix, since it is made of tougher tissue that helps “hold the baby inside the uterus” during pregnancy, must go through dramatic physiologic/anatomic changes to gradually stretch to the 10cm “goal” to allow for delivery of the baby (especially the baby’s head, which is the widest and least-collapsible part).

The vagina, on the other hand, is perfectly designed to stretch quite a bit, regardless of pregnancy or not, so there’s no preparatory “physiologic dilation” that has to happen there. True, sometimes the delivering doctor might do an episiotomy (cutting the vaginal and perineal tissue) to “enlarge” the opening if they feel the baby is having trouble getting out, but more and more studies seem to show that episiotomies are used more than is truly necessary. With careful stretching by the physician (or the patient’s partner, midwife, etc) during the preparatory stages of labor, the vaginal tissues can accommodate a lot of tension without tearing or ripping (at least, not tearing too horribly). And TA-DA! Baby comes out!

(Now, when a mommy and a daddy love each other a lot… oh, but that’s a different story for a different time.) :)

***Cranquis-Mails: 16***

A Pregnant Woman

One of my friends used to date an obstetrician, and one day he told her this story (and eventually she told me).

Some years ago, he and his colleagues got a very weird case. It was a pregnant woman - she seemed to be very poor (judging by her clothes, a homeless person) and very old (60-something - of course it could be just their impression, because of the terrible state she was in). She had been brought to the ER screaming in pain, but wouldn’t talk to anybody or answer questions in any way. She was accompanied by a teenager, a toothless girl with old-fashioned, thick clothes. She would also scream all the time, but at least she talked to other people and answered some questions (she said the pregnant woman was her mother), but most of her answers were nonsense (“What is happening to your mother?”, “She wanted to eat my hand”; “Where do you live?, "In a cardboard box, with the corpse”). She seemed terrified, scared of someone or something.

The woman seemed ready to give birth, she had all the signs - painful contractions, x cm of cervical dilation (I don’t remember how many, it’s been some time since he told the story) and, of course, a big baby bump.

But before the medical team could take the woman to the delivery room, she simply dropped dead. As the team rushed to her, still trying to grasp what the hell was happening, the teenage girl bursted out laughing and ran away. The place was a mess, and the guy who told the story said he and his colleagues were trying to resuscitate the woman, so they just let the girl go.

I don’t remember how exactly happened, but the guy said that eventually, he and the rest of the team decided to try and deliver the baby.

He said he will never forget it. He cut her belly open, and immediately saw something glistening.

Inside her womb were dozens of earthworms.

original