cervical cancer

please help!!!

i’m a disabled nonbinary guy who cannot work, and has no income, due to physical and mental illness. i need to raise nearly $8k for a full hysterectomy to treat cervical cancer. i’ve posted about this before but i’ve only managed to raise $300 in the span of two months. i’m not going to reduce myself to begging as i have in the past, but please, if you can, help me. my life is on the line.

please donate via the button on my page or directly to breathof.freshass@yahoo.com via paypal

if you want something for you money, consider my divination services or inquire about my other arts and crafts; i draw, make things (wands, athames, pendants, etc) out of human bone, and write fanfics. you can also message me with any questions you have about my situation.

if you see this, please reblog!!! i appreciate any help i can get. thank you to everyone who has supported me thus far!!!

Can anyone get HPV?

Someone asked us:

My teacher told me only women get HPV and not men; I don’t think that’s right or true. Could I get some clarification?

You’re right on this one. Anyone can get HPV— which is why it’s so important for everyone to get the HPV vaccine. There are a lot of different types of HPV, and most of them go away on their own and don’t cause cancer — but sometimes HPV can lead to cancer of the cervix, vagina, vulva, anus, penis, mouth or throat. The type of cancer that’s most often caused by HPV is cervical cancer, which is why some people associate HPV with people who have a cervix.

Unfortunately there’s no HPV test for people who are packing a penis. Those of us with a cervix can go to a doctor for an HPV or Pap test to look for HPV or any HPV-caused abnormal cells. HPV is super common, but the problems it can cause are easily treated when caught early.

Hope this helps!

-Kellie at Planned Parenthood

 

Let this sink in - a list of pre-existing conditions lost under #Trumpcare: 

Rape, C-section, AIDS/HIV, acid reflux, acne, ADD, addiction, Alzheimer’s/dementia, anemia, aneurysm, angioplasty, anorexia, anxiety, arrhythmia, arthritis, asthma, atrial fibrillation, autism, bariatric surgery, basal cell carcinoma, bipolar disorder, blood clot, breast cancer, bulimia, bypass surgery, celiac disease, cerebral aneurysm, cerebral embolism, cerebral palsy, cerebral thrombosis, cervical cancer, colon cancer, colon polyps, congestive heart failure, COPD, Crohn’s disease, cystic fibrosis, DMD, depression, diabetes, disabilities, Down syndrome, eating disorder, enlarged prostate, epilepsy, glaucoma, gout, heart disease, heart murmur, heartburn, hemophilia, hepatitis C, herpes, high cholesterol, hypertension, hysterectomy, kidney disease, kidney stones, kidney transplant, leukemia, lung cancer, lupus, lymphoma, mental health issues, migraines, MS, muscular dystrophy, narcolepsy, nasal polyps, obesity, OCD, organ transplant, osteoporosis, pacemaker, panic disorder, paralysis, paraplegia, Parkinson’s disease, pregnancy, restless leg syndrome, schizophrenia, seasonal affective disorder, seizures, sickle cell disease, skin cancer, sleep apnea, sleep disorders, stent, stroke, thyroid issues, tooth disease, tuberculosis, ulcers. 

This cannot pass the Senate, too – contact your senators, people!

[Source]

What does it mean if I need a colposcopy?

Someone asked us:

I have received an abnormal pap smear and have been called in for a colposcopy. Is it likely that this is HPV?


Yes - it is likely that the abnormal cells detected from your Pap test are the result of HPV. But no need to freak out yet - there are more than 100 types of HPV (human papilloma virus), and most have no harmful effect at all and go away on their own. Certain types of HPV may cause cell changes that sometimes lead to cervical cancer and certain other genital and throat cancers. These are called high-risk types.

A colposcopy will provide a closer look at whatever cervical cell changes were detected during your Pap test. During a colposcopy, a health care provider uses a colposcope — an instrument that looks like a pair of binoculars with a bright light mounted on a stand. Depending on what the health care provider sees, they’ll either recommend a follow-up Pap test in a few months, or they’ll collect a small amount of tissue in order to perform a biopsy. 

Sometimes, the biopsy is also the treatment. The health care provider may be able to remove all of the abnormal cells during the colposcopy and biopsy procedure. If so, no further treatment is needed.

Another procedure may be needed for further treatment if it’s determined you do have pre-cancerous cells. The following procedures are very effective at removing the abnormal areas of the cervix and preventing cervical cancer:

• Cryotherapy — abnormal tissue is frozen off

• LEEP — abnormal tissue is removed using a thin wire loop that carries an electrical current

• Laser — abnormal tissue is destroyed with a laser beam

• Cone biopsy — a cone-shaped wedge is cut out of the cervix

You should know that HPV is extremely common, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has reported that as many as 80 percent of women — and 50 percent of men and women combined — will get HPV at some point in their lives. However, most of those infections go away or are suppressed by the body within one to two years, without causing any problems that require treatment. 

Learn more about HPV.

- Emily at Planned Parenthood

What its like to be in your early 20′s with a chronic illness

Or in my case, multiple chronic illnesses.
1. Drinking: hahahahahahaha not with that medication babe. And if you can at all, very lightly. 

2. Going out: It depends on what the plans are, either way be prepared to cancel last minute and fear all of your friends hate you. Oh and if its for food, be prepared to have a massive anxiety attack about what you can/can’t each. Oh and if your intestines are going to explode in the middle of dinner.

3. Relationships: Constant fear that they are going to leave you because you are “always sick” “you never feel good”. Dates will be rare. Sex will be rare.

4. Sleep: You ALWAYS want it. Sometimes you lay there in agonizing pain and can’t seem to sleep. Sometimes you can’t wake up. Just depends on the day.

Through all of the good and bad days you have to grit your teeth and push through. You go to work when you want to stay home and rest your joints. You go to class, even though you have to get up every five minutes and puke. You try your hardest to have/keep conversations with people, even though you are jealous of their adventures and “spending money”. You choose which medication and which doctor bill you can afford out of your paycheck. You laugh, and tell everyone “yeah yeah one day I will have kids.” When you know your own medical conditions (and the fear of passing it on) will prevent that completely. Plus who would want to marry someone that was “always sick”.

Please Help My Friend Avoid Eviction

Lovies, babes, chronic illness friends, and my Ehlers-Danlos family - a dear friend of mine is in dire need of help in order to not be evicted from her home. I can vouch for her and her situation.

Donate via PayPal at mandolyn.orrell@gmail.com

She has EDS with cardiovascular involvement (cvEDS) as well as the standard hypermobility, pain, and dislocations. She was also just diagnosed last month with cervical cancer. She’s in the middle of several surgeries and facing possible chemo and radiation treatments if those don’t get it all. She’s also currently battling insurance for a power assist wheelchair, which they don’t want to cover.

She was illegally fired from her job last year for disclosing her EDS diagnosis, and is in the middle of several complaints and actions against the employer. In the meantime she’s driving for uber while looking for other work, but isn’t able to make ends meet on that alone. She is also raising her three nieces due to her sister’s death a few years ago from EDS related heart complications. Please help this family stay together in their home if you have anything to spare. I’d greatly appreciate any reblogs or sharing, especially among other chronic illness and disabled community blogs, even if you can’t spare $$$.

Donate via PayPal at mandolyn.orrell@gmail.com

bbc.com
A decade on, vaccine has halved cervical cancer rate
The world's first cancer vaccine has halved the number of new cervical cancers ten years after it was first administered in Australia.

The world’s first cancer vaccine was administered in Australia exactly 10 years ago.

Since then, the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine has been rolled out across 130 countries and halved the number of new cervical cancers.

The HPV vaccine also protects against cancers in the throat and mouth in both men and women.

Prof Ian Frazer said the vaccine could eradicate cancers caused by HPV within 40 years.

“It helps not only control cervical cancer but also the oropharyngeal cancer - the cancers inside the mouth that are caused by these viruses,” Prof Frazer, chief executive of the Translational Research Institute, said.

“If we vaccinate enough people we will eliminate these viruses because they only infect humans. And in Australia there’s already been a 90% reduction in infections in the 10 years the programme has been running.”

Continue Reading.


I found this on Facebook:

————————————————–

If you or a loved one have a pre-existing condition, your insurance premiums and deductibles will skyrocket under the Republican (non) healthcare plan, or may be denied coverage. Pre-existing conditions include, but are not limited to:

AIDS/HIV,
acid reflux,
acne,
ADD,
addiction,
Alzheimer’s/dementia,
anemia,
aneurysm,
angioplasty,
anorexia,
anxiety,
arrhythmia,
arthritis,
asthma,
atrial fibrillation,
autism,
bariatric surgery,
basal cell carcinoma,
bipolar disorder,
blood clot,
breast cancer,
bulimia,
bypass surgery,
celiac disease,
cerebral aneurysm,
cerebral embolism,
cerebral palsy,
cerebral thrombosis,
cervical cancer,
colon cancer,
colon polyps,
congestive heart failure,
COPD,
Crohn’s disease,
cystic fibrosis,
DMD,
depression,
diabetes,
disabilities,
Down syndrome,
eating disorder,
enlarged prostate,
epilepsy,
glaucoma,
gout,
heart disease,
heart murmur,
heartburn,
hemophilia,
hepatitis C,
herpes,
high cholesterol,
hypertension,
hysterectomy,
kidney disease,
kidney stones,
kidney transplant,
leukemia,
lung cancer,
lupus,
lymphoma,
mental health issues,
migraines,
MS,
muscular dystrophy,
narcolepsy,
nasal polyps,
obesity,
OCD,
organ transplant,
osteoporosis,
pacemaker,
panic disorder,
paralysis,
paraplegia,
Parkinson’s disease,
pregnancy,
restless leg syndrome,
schizophrenia,
seasonal affective disorder,
seizures,
sickle cell disease,
skin cancer,
sleep apnea,
sleep disorders,
stent,
stroke,
thyroid issues,
tooth disease,
tuberculosis, and
ulcers

Republicans in Congress have exempted themselves and their staff members from losing the ACA protections that cover pre-existing conditions.

Gynecologic Cancer Warning Signs

Warning Symptoms:

I kind of feel like I need to post this every few months. Keep an eye out for this stuff, ladies. 

  • Indigestion, heartburn, nausea, or gas
  • Abdominal swelling or discomfort
  • Pelvic pain or cramping
  • Bloating or a sense of fullness, even after small meals
  • Backache
  • Painful, frequent, or burning urination with no infection
  • Diarrhea or constipation
  • Loss of appetite or unintentional weight loss or gain
  • Vaginal bleeding or irregular periods
  • Unusual vaginal bleeding or discharge after menopause
  • Pain during intercourse

okay here’s the deal. i need a full hysterectomy. my maternal grandmother passed down the genes for cervical cancer and my medicine hightens the risk, on top of that my white cells are WAY the fuck up. before insurance, it’s $8k. so since we’re looking at the big C here, i was hoping for some support. I’m done being vague.

you can donate via paypal to breathof.freshass@yahoo.com or ask about my divination services and art commissions. PLEASE REBLOG THIS!!!

anonymous asked:

Hello, I got a call yesterday from my OBGYN saying that my pap was mildly abnormal and that I was high risk positive for HPV but the test was non differential or something..I was in shock that I couldn't think of any questions to ask. I go back in 6months so I haven't told anyone about my results yet...Does this mean I have cancer???? How did I get it if my paps & HPV results have been negative in the past?? What about my partner if men can't get tested?? So scared please help! Thanks

It doesn’t mean you have cancer, but it can mean that there are cells in your cervix that could potentially turn into cancer if left untreated. You may need further tests and/or treatment including:

  • Colposcopy — a procedure to look more closely at the cervix to see if there are precancerous cells.
  • Cryotherapy — a treatment to freeze and remove precancerous cells from the cervix.
  • LEEP or Loop Electrosurgical Excision Procedure — a treatment to remove precancerous cells from the cervix with an electrical current

HPV is a sexually transmitted infection, so if your partner is the only person you had since your last negative HPV you had to get it from him. There is no cure for HPV, but your immune system can fight the virus on its own. I will give you some links where you can find more information.

-mod Fiora

Cervical Smears

Smears are done because of the risk of cervical cancer. Because of benign cellular changes during puberty, the cervix is inherently vulnerable to further changes in later life, which if not treated may lead to cancer. 

Risk factors for Cervical Cancer:

  • Puberty (Major factor)
  • Exposure to HPV virus 16, 18, 31,33(Major factor)
  • Immunosuppression (eg. long term steroid use, HIV)
  • Smoking
  • Combined oral contraceptives

The major risk factor, which causes the most concern, is exposure to the sexually transmitted (and common) Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), as the above cause changes to cell DNA which transform the cell into a pre-malignant state - dysplasia, or Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN). The two strains (out of 130) 16 and 18, account for 75% of all cases, and are now being vaccinated against in the UK.

Cervical Smears are therefore done to detect changes in cells of the cervix:

  • Age 25 - 49 - once every 3 years
  • Age 50 - 64 - once every 5 years
  • Age >65 - only done if recent abnormal smear

NB - if age > 25, but not ever sexually active, no screening necessary.

Screening Smears have reduced Cervical Carcinoma incidence by 91% - awesome!

Smear Results

Normal - continue with routine screening

Borderline/Mild abnormalities - Check for presence of HPV

  • HPV absent –> routine screening
  • HPV present –> colposcopy

Moderate changes –> colposcopy

Severe changes –> Urgent colposcopy

Colposcopy Actions

Mild suspicion - Biopsy, repeat smear in 6 months

Moderate suspicion - Large Loop Excision of Transformation Zone - LLETZ

Suggests Invasion - Cone Biopsy

Further management is based on the histological biopsy results, and may be treated with further surgery, or chemo-radiotherapy.

What does an abnormal Pap test mean for my partner and me?

Someone asked us:

Hi I recently got an abnormal papsmear and I was told I have hpv? but I didn’t have it last year my bf and i are exclusive with each other. Does this mean my bf now has it as well? And what if I’m trying to have a baby?? please help me understand I’m very stressed out.

I’m sorry you’re so stressed out. The truth is there’s probably nothing to be scared of just yet. HPV is very very common — most people will get it at some point in their lives.

Sometimes HPV is dormant and doesn’t show symptoms or show up on a Pap test until months or years after getting it, so it’s pretty much impossible to know when you got it or from whom. It’s possible your boyfriend has it, and it’s possible he had it first (just because HPV didn’t show up in your Pap last year doesn’t mean it wasn’t in your body). And there’s no HPV test for men, so there’s really no way to know if he has it.

The good news is that HPV usually clears up on its own. You may need to have Pap tests done more often for a while to see if it goes away on its own or not. If it doesn’t, your doctor can give you tests/treatment in the future to keep you healthy. And you can absolutely have a totally healthy pregnancy if you have HPV. If the HPV does progress and eventually needs treatment, you’re still very likely to have a totally healthy pregnancy. Just make sure you follow your doctor’s recommendations for how often you should get Pap tests so they can keep an eye on it.

Learn more about HPV and Pap tests>>

Hope this helps!

-Julia at Planned Parenthood

You look into Trump’s eyes and you see the fear and confusion of a man who has just been told he’s got stage-four cervical cancer. He is a super-villain in a world without heroes, a man so obnoxious and unhappy that karma may see him reincarnated as himself. You kind of wish he’d get therapy, but at this stage it’s like hiring a window cleaner for a burning building. It’s still difficult to classify him exactly: he’s not a classic Nazi, but would burn books if his supporters knew how to read.
—  Frankie Boyle
If you are more afraid of your teenage daughter having sex than you are of your teenager daughter getting cervical cancer, you are a bad parent

If only because you are dumb enough to think that your teenage daughter will suddenly decide to have sex because she’s lessened the chances of getting one type of STD, when she already can go to the nearest pharmacy, supermarket or gas station and buy a relatively cheap contraption that prevents almost all types of STDs as well as pregnancy, you are a fucking moron.