central-asia

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Ceiling of the Museum of Applied Arts in Tashkent, Tashkent, Republic of Uzbekistan, unknown photographer, source: eurasia.travel. Possibly the best-looking museum in Tashkent, the Museum of Applied Arts is situated in the former home of Imperial Russian diplomat Alexander Polovtsev. This museum is as popular for its setting as for its many beautiful exhibits. Polovtsev was an avid collector of handicrafts and his personal possessions still form the heart of the museum’s superb collection of decorative arts. Tsarist diplomat expressed his appreciation of Uzbek architecture by having his residence built by masters from Bukhara, Samarkand, Khiva, Ferghana and Tashkent. He was transferred before completion in 1907, so never saw the finished courtyard of verandas and reception halls, vibrant with colour, ganch and wooden carving. The first public exhibition was held here in 1927, and it was classified as a national collection a decade later, source: eurasia.travel.

Remembering the Kyrgyz Woman Who Adopted 150 Children During the Siege of Leningrad

“A legend”: this is how Kyrgyz and Russian media are referring to Toktogon Altybasarova, 91, who sheltered 150 children evacuated from Leningrad over the course of a two-and-a-half-year blockade during World War Two that cost up to a million lives.

In 1942, as Nazi Germany bombarded Russia’s second city, now called St. Petersburg, 16-year-old Altybasarova, who died last week on June 11, spared the evacuees from hunger and hosted them in a dormitory for local factory staff in her remote home village of Kurmenty, northeastern Kyrgyzstan.

She had just been elected head of her village council at the time.

Altybasarova determined the children’s age and gave them first names. Supervising a team of carers, she saw the children through to adulthood as they left to work and study in different parts of the Soviet Union.

According to Kyrgyzstan’s state broadcaster, Altybasarova kept and treasured letters from her adopted children until her death. 

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Paintings by an Uzbek artist, Saira Keltaeva.

Saira Keltaeva was born on 16 May 1961 in Kumyshkan, Tashkent region, Uzbek SSR. In 1979 Saira Keltaeva graduated from the National Music Art School, boarding arts class on easel painting, she was taught under the guidance of Art teacher A.P.Perova - national artist of Uzbekistan. The same year she entered Theatre and Art Institute in Tashkent. Saira Keltaeva is a member of the Creative Union of Artists at the Academy of Arts of Uzbekistan. Saira’s works are exhibited in museums and Art Galleries, as well as in private collections in Korea, China, Turkey, Germany, Holland, Italy, France and the United States.

Photo and caption by Tugo Cheng

As the largest mountain ranges in Central Asia, Tian-shan (‘sky-mountain’ in Chinese), has one of the best collections of natural landscapes in the world and is seen by many as a paradise for outdoor adventures. Thanks to the richness of sediments compounded with the power of erosion by rivers flowing down the mountains, the north face of Tian-shan is carved into stunning plateaus and colorful canyons hundreds of meters deep, resulting in this surrealist painting in nature. Source

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So I decided to post my portfolio I made for Gobelins last spring. Not all the pages though :p


Gobelins part 01
This story is called “guardian of the mountain” (super original name as you can see)

It’s a mongolian based universe with a little bit of fantasy!

the main character is a little girl called Chuluun. She’s so easy to draw! X3

©Estelle Hocquet 2014

Do not use without permission

 

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 nephyla-locura​ SAID: C’EST HYPER CANON !!! T’AS ÉTÉ PRISE AU FAIT (J’AI RIEN SUIVI XD) ? (AVEC CE GENRE DE PLANCHES DANS TON BOOK CE SERAIT UN CRIME SI C’ÉTAIT PAS LE CAS !)


 oui j'ai été prise :p c'est le début de la grande aventure là 8D haha merci!