celtic faeries

Pagan Musicians Masterpost

Here’s a list of pagan bands/artists for your listening pleasure! Feel free to add more if you know them:

  • Damh the Bard - Folk (Celtic)
  • Blackmore’s Night - Folk Rock (Renaissance)
  • Castalia - Rock (Wiccan/Greek)
  • Elaine Silver - Folk/Acapella (Faerie)
  • Emerald Rose - Folk (Celtic/Wiccan?)
  • Enya - New Age  (Not actually pagan, but very calming/spiritual)
  • Faun - German Rock (Celtic/Norse)
  • Fleetwood Mac - Soft Rock (Again, not pagan, but spiritual)
  • Stevie Nicks - Pop/Folk Rock (Lead singer of FM, very witchy)
  • Fugli - Folk/Spoken Word (Shakespearean Faerie)
  • Gary Stadler - New Age Composer/Pianist (Celtic/Faerie)
  • Fehu - Folk Rock (Norse)
  • Wendy Rule - New Age/Rock (Faerie)
  • Heather Dale - Folk Rock (Greek)
  • KIVA - New Age/Chants (Greek/Celtic)
  • Spiral Dance - Folk Rock (Greek/Celtic)
  • Heather Alexander - Irish Folk/Acapella (Celtic/Arthurian)
  • Lisa Thiel - Acapella/Folk (Faerie)
  • Moonstruck - Rock/Metal (Wiccan/Celtic)
  • Lucidian - Folk (Wiccan)
  • Llewellyn - New Age (Arthurian/Healing Spirituality)
  • Robert Gass - Chants (Mother Earth Spirituality)
  • S.J. Tucker - Folk Rock (Celtic-ish, just generally Witchy)
  • Spiral Rhythm - Chants (Perfect for drum circles)
  • Threefold - New Age (Wiccan/Celtic)
  • Gheorghe Zamfir - Instrumental Pop (Pan pipes)
  • Loreena McKennitt - New Age/Folk Rock (Celtic)
  • Heidevolk - Folk Metal (Norse/Celtic)
  • Wolfchant - Viking Metal (Norse)
  • Arkona - Russian Pagan Metal (Norse)
Faerie Path

It is a route taken by the faeries, commonly in a straight line and between sites of traditionally significance, such as faerie forts or raths (a class of circular earthwork dating from the Iron Age), mountains and hills, thorn bushes, springs, lakes, rock outcrops, and Stone Age monuments. 

Folklore 

In some parts of Ireland, Brittany and Germany, there were faerie paths that while being invisible, had been seen as geographical locations by the country people, and that building practices were adapted to ensure they were not obstructed.

The Corpse Roads of Europe are believed to be faerie paths. In Germany and the Netherlands, these tend to be straight invisible lines and are known by a variety of names including Geisterweg (“ghost-way” or “ghost-road”) and Helweg (“hell-way” or “hell-road”) in German and Doodweg (“death-way” or “death-road”) in Dutch. A similarly straight road did however run straight over various burial mounds at Rösaring, Lassa in southern Sweden.

In Ireland, people who had illnesses or other misfortune, were said to live in houses that were “in the way” or in a “contrary place”, obstructing a faerie path. An example of this faerie path straightness is provided by an account concerning a croft (now a cattle shed) at Knockeencreen, Brosna, County Kerry:

In an interview in the 1980s, the last human occupant told of the troubles his grandfather had experienced there, with his cattle periodically and inexplicably dying. The front door is exactly opposite the back door. The grandfather was informed by a passing gypsy that the dwelling stands on a fairy path running between two hills. The gypsy advised the grandfather to keep the doors slightly ajar at night to allow the fairies free passage. The advice was heeded and the problem ceased. It so happens that the building is indeed on a straight line drawn between two local hilltops, and is, moreover, at one end of a long, straight track.

It was believed that a house built on a faerie path would suffer from midnight noises or supernatural manifestations. Bad luck in the form of sick farm animals or personal illness could be the result and one remedy was to build small fires in several places along the faerie path, using fire from the blessed fire of Saint John’s Eve that was lit every year at sunset on 23 June.

Irish faerie paths are said to also exist under water, reminiscent of causeways in marshes at sacred sites and those to crannogs and other islands. These paths, only used by the faerie folk, ran from one island to another and were paved with coral, making them and their travellers visible to fishermen in their boats above.

Detection

Before construction of houses, builders used the technique of mapping out the floor plan in the earth and placing a pile of stones at each corner and leaving it overnight, if the stones were undisturbed it was safe to build, otherwise the work would not continue. There is another theme that states if one’s house is on a faerie path, one must leave the doors and windows open at night, front and back, to allow fairies to pass through. Builders were also advised against using white quartz in their stonework, as it is said to be a faerie stone.

A building placed on a faerie path would be demolished by the faerie folk, at least twice, often remaining standing however on the third attempt.

Walking Alongside The Paths

Although it is usually said that they should be avoided, some are reputed to be beneficial to humans - such as the “trods” of West England. These are a straight-line faerie path in the grass of a field with a different shade of green to the rest. People with rheumatism sought relief by walking along these tracks, though animals avoid them. Great danger was still very much associated with using these paths at times when a supernatural procession might be using them.

  • The Tylwyth teg of Wales have paths on which it is death for a mortal to walk. 
  • The Breton Ankou, who is king of the dead, and his subjects have their own particular paths along which they process.

O I forbid you, maidens a’,
That wear gowd on your hair,
To come or gae by Carterhaugh,
For young Tam Lin is there.

There’s nane that gaes by Carterhaugh
But they leave him a wad,
Either their rings, or green mantles,
Or else their maidenhead.

Janet has kilted her green kirtle
A little aboon her knee,
And she has broded her yellow hair
A little aboon her bree,
And she’s awa to Carterhaugh
As fast as she can hie.

When she came to Carterhaugh
Tam Lin was at the well,
And there she fand his steed standing,
But away was himsel.

She had na pu’d a double rose,
A rose but only twa,
Till upon then started young Tam Lin,
Says, Lady, thou’s pu nae mae.

Why pu’s thou the rose, Janet,
And why breaks thou the wand?
Or why comes thou to Carterhaugh
Withoutten my command?

“Carterhaugh, it is my own,
My daddy gave it me,
I’ll come and gang by Carterhaugh,
And ask nae leave at thee.”

Janet has kilted her green kirtle
A little aboon her knee,
And she has broded her yellow hair
A little aboon her bree,
And she is to her father’s ha,
As fast as she can hie.

Four and twenty ladies fair
Were playing at the ba,
And out then came the fair Janet,
The flower among them a’.

Four and twenty ladies fair
Were playing at the chess,
And out then came the fair Janet,
As green as onie glass.

Out then spake an auld grey knight,
Lay oer the castle wa,
And says, Alas, fair Janet, for thee,
But we’ll be blamed a’.

“Haud your tongue, ye auld fac’d knight,
Some ill death may ye die!
Father my bairn on whom I will,
I’ll father none on thee.”

Out then spak her father dear,
And he spak meek and mild,
“And ever alas, sweet Janet,” he says,
“I think thou gaest wi child.”

“If that I gae wi child, father,
Mysel maun bear the blame,
There’s neer a laird about your ha,
Shall get the bairn’s name.

“If my love were an earthly knight,
As he’s an elfin grey,
I wad na gie my ain true-love
For nae lord that ye hae.

“The steed that my true love rides on
Is lighter than the wind,
Wi siller he is shod before,
Wi burning gowd behind.”

Janet has kilted her green kirtle
A little aboon her knee,
And she has broded her yellow hair
A little aboon her bree,
And she’s awa to Carterhaugh
As fast as she can hie.

When she came to Carterhaugh,
Tam Lin was at the well,
And there she fand his steed standing,
But away was himsel.

She had na pu’d a double rose,
A rose but only twa,
Till up then started young Tam Lin,
Says, Lady, thou pu’s nae mae.

“Why pu’s thou the rose, Janet,
Amang the groves sae green,
And a’ to kill the bonny babe
That we gat us between?”

“O tell me, tell me, Tam Lin,” she says,
“For’s sake that died on tree,
If eer ye was in holy chapel,
Or christendom did see?”

“Roxbrugh he was my grandfather,
Took me with him to bide
And ance it fell upon a day
That wae did me betide.

“And ance it fell upon a day
A cauld day and a snell,
When we were frae the hunting come,
That frae my horse I fell,
The Queen o’ Fairies she caught me,
In yon green hill do dwell.

“And pleasant is the fairy land,
But, an eerie tale to tell,
Ay at the end of seven years,
We pay a tiend to hell,
I am sae fair and fu o flesh,
I’m feard it be mysel.

“But the night is Halloween, lady,
The morn is Hallowday,
Then win me, win me, an ye will,
For weel I wat ye may.

“Just at the mirk and midnight hour
The fairy folk will ride,
And they that wad their true-love win,
At Miles Cross they maun bide.”

“But how shall I thee ken, Tam Lin,
Or how my true-love know,
Amang sa mony unco knights,
The like I never saw?”

“O first let pass the black, lady,
And syne let pass the brown,
But quickly run to the milk-white steed,
Pu ye his rider down.

“For I’ll ride on the milk-white steed,
And ay nearest the town,
Because I was an earthly knight
They gie me that renown.

“My right hand will be gloved, lady,
My left hand will be bare,
Cockt up shall my bonnet be,
And kaimed down shall my hair,
And thae’s the takens I gie thee,
Nae doubt I will be there.

“They’ll turn me in your arms, lady,
Into an esk and adder,
But hold me fast, and fear me not,
I am your bairn’s father.

“They’ll turn me to a bear sae grim,
And then a lion bold,
But hold me fast, and fear me not,
And ye shall love your child.

“Again they’ll turn me in your arms
To a red het gand of airn,
But hold me fast, and fear me not,
I’ll do you nae harm.

“And last they’ll turn me in your arms
Into the burning gleed,
Then throw me into well water,
O throw me in with speed

“And then I’ll be your ain true-love,
I’ll turn a naked knight,
Then cover me wi your green mantle,
And hide me out o sight.”

Gloomy, gloomy was the night,
And eerie was the way,
As fair Jenny in her green mantle
To Miles Cross she did gae.

At the mirk and midnight hour
She heard the bridles sing,
She was as glad at that
As any earthly thing.

First she let the black pass by,
And syne she let the brown,
But quickly she ran to the milk-white steed,
And pu’d the rider down.

Sae weel she minded what he did say,
And young Tam Lin did win,
Syne covered him wi her green mantle,
As blythe’s a bird in spring

Out then spak the Queen o Fairies,
Out of a bush o broom,
“Them that has gotten young Tam Lin
Has gotten a stately-groom.”

Out then spak the Queen o Fairies,
And an angry woman was she,
“Shame betide her ill-far’d face,
And an ill death may she die,
For she’s taen awa the bonniest knight
In a’ my companie.

“But had I kend, Tam Lin,” said she,
“What now this night I see,
I wad hae taen out thy twa grey een,
And put in twa een o tree.”

—  Tam Lin, traditional Ballad as recorded by James Child (1729)

Hello! I am a newbie pagan and have been exploring various corners over the past few years, after being slowly drawn to it my whole life. This new blog is my official attempt to reach out to the community I’d love to be a part of.

That being said, I’m desperately looking for blogs to follow!

Please like/reblog if you post any of the following:

  • Druidry/Druidism
  • Celtic paganism, polytheism, reconstructionism, etc.  
  • Witchy things
  • Faerie things
  • Tarot
  • Divination
  • Herbalism
  • Astrology
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Creatures of European myth and folklore, “fairy” (known as faerie, fair folk, etc.) was originally applied to a variety of beings including goblins, sprites, brownies, nymphs,pixies, and eventually, elves. 

Most faerie stories are warnings against interacting with them or tales of their mischievousness and trickery; faeries are known to steal human children and replace them with their own sickly infants, steal livestock, tangle the hair of unsuspecting sleepers, and lure individuals into the time-warped fairy realms. As they are seen as a nuisance, there exist many solutions for being rid of fairies or keeping them at bay: offerings of cream, butter, or bread will make a fairy more friendly to an individual, wearing clothes inside out will confuse them (and thus, preventing them from confusing the wearer), and holy water or cold iron will repel them. 

Faeries in Magic are most often depicted as sprites or pixies and their penchant for trickery as a device for their own amusement lends to the interpretation of faeries as blue/black. However, the popular perception of faeries as small woodland creatures gives weight to the argument that faeries should still be in green.