popsci.com
New Pill Will Let People With Celiac Disease Eat Gluten-Filled Meals Of Their Dreams
Bring on the gluten

All Hoon Sunwoo wanted was to drink a beer with his friend. But his friend has celiac disease, an autoimmune condition in which a person generates an immune response to gluten, a mix of proteins found in anything from pasta to soy sauce. The resulting inflammation limits that person’s ability to digest and absorb key nutrients from food. Luckily for his friend, Hoon Sunwoo is a professor of pharmacology at the University of Alberta, and he’s spent the last 10 years developing a pill that his friend could take before drinking a beer so that he wouldn’t feel sick afterward.

When a person with celiac disease takes the pill, antibodies found in egg yolk coat the gluten as it passes through the digestive tract. That way, it doesn’t stimulate the sensitive gluten receptors in the small intestine. The pill has to be taken five minutes before eating, and works for a maximum of two hours, during which the person could chug beer or chow down on pizza worry-free.

The pill isn’t a treatment or a cure for celiac, Sunwoo tells the CBC—it’s just a way to improve a patient’s quality of life.

Through a partnership between the University of Alberta and biotech company IGY Incorporated, the pill completed its first phase of clinical trials two months ago in Canada showing that it’s safe. Its developers plan to start the next phase showing the pill’s efficacy next year. If all goes well, the pill could be available commercially in just two to three years, according to some reports.

MAY- is the month of coeliac awareness

Hello everyone! so you may not know this but I have coeliac disease, and as the month of May (and more specifically the week commencing the 11th) is the time devoted to raising coeliac awareness, I thought I would talk to you guys about it

Coeliac (or celiac) disease is an autoimmune condition which causes the body to mistake the gluten protein as an invader and ‘attack’ it in the small intestine. These leads to something called villi atrophy- in which the finger-like projections in the small intestine are destroyed and the whole small intestine becomes inflamed. Because of this, the body suffers from digestive issues, malabsorbtion and malnutrition. 

This leads to many horrible symptoms such as:

I was diagnosed with coeliac disease in November 2013 after being ill for around 6 years. The average time it takes for a diagnosis in the UK is between 8 and 12 years. By the time I was diagnosed I weighed 6 stone, and had severe dehydration and nutrient defeciences. I was told multiple times by doctors that I was suffering from IBS, without them carrying out a simple blood test to make sure nothing more sinister was going on.

Many people think that coeliac disease is not a serious disease, that it is just some sort of food intolerance that makes people a little windy. No. While the severity of symptoms do vary, it is a serious condition which left untreated can lead to an increased risk of bowel cancer, osteoporosis and neurological conditions. Also, as coeliac disease is an autoimmune condition, we are at greater risk of having other conditions such as asthma, Chron’s disease, lupus etc.

In fact, even 1 ½ years after being diagnosed I am still suffering from health conditions because my small intestine has not yet recovered. I am still underweight, I am still extremely weak and I still suffer from neurological symptoms. In Europe, the health related quality of life of people with coeliac disease is markedly lower than the normal population despite a gluten free diet. 

Whilst it is wonderful that coeliac disease can be treated so effectively with a gluten free diet, it should still be seen as a serious disease which can cause a lot of suffering and remains with us all of our lives. 

In the press and media recently it seems to be popular to make a gluten free diet and people with coeliac disease the brunt of stupid jokes. I am not weak, it is not funny to shove a pie in a coeliacs face, and no you are not gluten free intolerant. Stop. For me, a gluten free diet is not a lifestyle choice, it is keeping me alive.

There are several issues at the moment that need addressing:

  • the negative perception of coeliac disease by the public and media
  • the horrendously long time it takes to get a diagnosis 
  • the quality of treatment once diagnosed
  • the price and quality of gluten free goods 
  • the lack of knowledge and awareness of coeliac disease among the public and health care professionals 

To learn more about coeliac disease here is the Coeliac UK website

If you read all of this, thank you so much!

Please, please, please reblog this to raise awareness, I will love you forever! 

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This week is Coeliac Awareness Week in the UK (11th-17th May 2015) . It’s so important. Here are the facts (Source - Coeliac UK website):

“What is coeliac disease?

Coeliac disease (pronounced see-liac and spelled celiac in other countries) is a lifelong autoimmune disease. It is caused by the immune system reacting to gluten.

How common is coeliac disease?

Coeliac disease is common and affects one in 100 people. However only 24% who have the condition have been diagnosed which means there are currently nearly half a million people who have coeliac disease but don’t yet know. If a first degree family member (such as mother, father, sister or brother) has the condition then the chances of having it increase to one in 10.

What causes coeliac disease?

Coeliac disease is caused by a reaction of the immune system to gluten – a protein found in wheat, barley and rye. When someone with coeliac disease eats gluten, their immune system reacts by damaging the lining of the small intestine.

What are the symptoms of coeliac disease?

Symptoms range from mild to severe, and can include bloating, diarrhoea, nausea, wind, constipation, tiredness, mouth ulcers, sudden or unexpected weight loss (but not in all cases), hair loss and anaemia.

What is the treatment for coeliac disease?

Once diagnosed, the only treatment for coeliac disease is a gluten-free diet. Gluten is found in wheat, barley and rye. Some people are also sensitive to oats. Once gluten is removed from the diet, you should start to feel much better.”

(Below, from the NHS website):

“Complications

Complications of coeliac disease only tend to affect people who continue to eat gluten or who have yet to be diagnosed with the condition, which can be a common problem in milder cases.

Potential long-term complications include:

Less common and more serious complications include those affecting pregnancy, such as having a low-birth weight baby, and some types of cancers, such as bowel cancer.”

Coeliac disease can affect anyone. Some Coeliacs do not have symptoms, or have very mild symptoms and only find out about the condition due to family members being diagnosed.

This essentially means that those of us living with the disease have to cut out foods such as pasta, bread, pizza, cakes, some breakfast cereals, ready made foods and do a lot of research before eating out. Gluten is hidden is lots of foods that you wouldn’t even know about - soy sauce, mustard, some mayonnaise, cous cous, some sweets, some chocolate, even chips sometimes have a wheat coating!

To top it off, even a single gluten-containing breadcrumb falling into our food by accident can make us ill. Cross contamination of gluten is a great fear for Coeliacs and those with other gluten related illnesses, so special preparation areas are often needed, at home and in eateries.

As you can see living gluten free is far from easy. GF alternatives are becoming more and more available all the time but we need your help. 

The more people who are aware, the more companies will cater for us, so please reblog this, share it with friends and family, on other sites, print it out and stick it up somewhere, and not only could you be helping to diagnose someone, you could be making a difficult illness slightly easier to live with.

If you have any of the above symptoms please go to your doctor. If you would like to donate to Coeliac UK please do so here. If you have questions about the illness you can message me, but I would recommend going to Coeliac UK or the NHS website for more details, as I can only use my own experience, I’m not a doctor.



** It is also important to know that some people can have gluten intolerance, or sensitivities. This means their illness is not auto-immune like Coeliac disease but often has similar symptoms. People with these illnesses may not have to remove gluten all together as they may be able to tolerate small amounts without damaging the gut.

youtube

What It’s Like to Be Celiac

Being gluten-free is the coolest thing since sliced bread… oh wait!

What is Coeliac Disease?

Hello everyone! I have refractory coeliac disease, so I thought it would be a good idea to make a post explaining coeliac disease and my personal experience with it.

I made a post a few months ago on my book blog on coeliac disease, so I have just altered it. I will probably update this post a few times, so the page on my blog will be the most up to date version.

Coeliac (or celiac) disease is an autoimmune condition which causes the body to mistake the gluten protein as an invader and ‘attack’ it in the small intestine. These leads to something called villi atrophy- in which the finger-like projections in the small intestine are destroyed and the whole small intestine becomes inflamed. Because of this, the body suffers from digestive issues, malabsorbtion and malnutrition.

This leads to many horrible symptoms such as:

  • frequent diarrhea
  • abdominal pain and cramps
  • gastritis
  • nausea and vomiting
  • chronic fatigue
  • bloating
  • weight loss
  • constipation
  • mouth ulcers
  • neurological symptoms such as dizziness, headaches, vertigo
  • muscle cramps and joint pains

The inflammation in the small intestine leads to gastric symptoms whilst the malnutrition, vitamin deficiencies and dehydration cause some of the neurological symptoms and fatigue. There is debate amongst the scientific community on the effect of coeliac disease on the rest of the systems in the body.

I was diagnosed with coeliac disease in November 2013 after being ill for around 6 years. The average time it takes for a diagnosis in the UK is between 13 years! By the time I was diagnosed I weighed 6 stone, and had severe dehydration and nutrient defeciences. I was told multiple times by doctors that I was suffering from IBS, without them carrying out a simple blood test to make sure nothing more sinister was going on.

Many people think that coeliac disease is not a serious disease, that it is just some sort of food intolerance that makes people a little windy. No. While the severity of symptoms do vary, it is a serious condition which left untreated can lead to an increased risk of bowel cancer, osteoporosis and neurological conditions. Also, as coeliac disease is an autoimmune condition, we are at greater risk of having other autoimmune conditions such as asthma, arthritis, Chron’s disease, lupus etc.

Even after being diagnosed I am still suffering from health conditions because my small intestine has not yet recovered. I have refractory coeliac disease, which means that despite adhering to a strict gluten free diet I am still suffering from symptoms of coeliac disease, with elevated levels of gluten antibodies. I am still underweight, I am still extremely weak and I still suffer from neurological and digestive symptoms.

In Europe, the health related quality of life of people with coeliac disease is markedly lower than the normal population despite a gluten free diet.


Whilst it is wonderful that coeliac disease can usually be treated so effectively with a gluten free diet, it should still be seen as a serious disease which can cause a lot of suffering and remains with us all of our lives.

In the press and media recently it seems to be popular to make a gluten free diet and people with coeliac disease the brunt of stupid jokes. I am not weak, it is not funny to shove a pie in a coeliac’s face, and no you are not gluten free intolerant. Stop. For me, a gluten free diet is not a lifestyle choice, it is keeping me alive.

There are several issues at the moment that need addressing:

  • the negative perception of coeliac disease by the public and media
  • the horrendously long time it takes to get a diagnosis
  • the quality of treatment once diagnosed
  • the price and quality of gluten free goods
  • the lack of knowledge and awareness of coeliac disease among the public and health care professionals

If you want to learn more about coeliac disease here is the Coeliac UK website, the NHS page, and the Wikipedia page

If you are a newbie coeliac, please message me for advice on GF diets and other things I can help you with!!

Thank you!! Emily xx

(if there are any issues with this post or something makes you uncomfortable about it, please message me and I can change it right away!)