10

10 of the Most Majestic Caves in the World

  1. Ice Cave Near The Mutnovsky Volcano, Russia - Ice caves like these form in the glaciers surrounding the Mutnovsky Volcano in Russia. Some of them are formed by vents that release volcanic heat and gases called fumaroles. (photo by Florian Wizorek)
  2. Glowworms Cave, New Zealand - The Waitomo glowworm caves are home to a unique insect – the glowworm. These insects hang glistening silken strands from the ceiling of the cave and glow to attract unsuspecting prey. (photo by waitomo.com)
  3. Son Doong Cave, Vietnam - This is the largest currently known cave in the world. It is filled with countless wonders including isolated ecosystems, weather systems and geological formations. (photo by National Geographic)
  4. Batu Caves, Malaysia - These caves have been used by English and Chinese settlers as well as the indigenous Temuan people. The bat guano in the cave was mined for agricultural purposes, but now the cave is filled with statues and is open to visitors. (photo by Danny Xeero)
  5. Marble Caves, Patagonia - Theses caves are known for the spectacular reflections that the turquoise water casts on the white marble ceiling of the cave. They are also called the Marble Cathedral because of their beautiful and arching forms. (photo by kellywhite)
  6. Phraya Nakhon Cave, Thailand - This cave was historically a popular visiting place for local kings because of the illumination provided by the collapsed roofs. The pavilion in the center was built for the visit of King Chulalongkorn in 1890. (photo by Wasitpol Unchanakorrakit)
  7. Ellison’s Cave, United States - This photograph is of the Fantastic Cave pit, part of Ellison’s Cave in the state of Georgia. It is a popular attraction for pit cavers – those who enjoy rappelling down vertical subterranean drops. (photo by secondglobe.com)
  8. Vatnajokull Glacier Cave, Iceland - This cave is located in the largest glacier in Europe. Caves like these form due to melting glacial icewater, but they can be dangerous because glaciers are constantly breaking and changing. (photo by Einar Runar Sigurdson)
  9. Cave in Algarve, Portugal - Due to its location, the cave is prone to various seaside formations because of the rock face’s relative solubility in water. This specific cave near Lagos is accessible only by water. (photo by Bruno Carlos)
  10. Reed Flute Cave, China - The Reed Flute Cave in Guangxi, China has been visited by tourists for at least 1200 years. The cave is home to a spectacular array of stalagmites and stalactites. It is named for the reeds that grow at its mouth, which can be made into flutes. (photo by Pasquale di Pilato)
10

EpicDash: 32 Surreal Places On Earth That Belong In A Dream, Part 2. 

Part 1 here

1: Turquoise Ice, Lake Baikal, Russia. Lake Baikal is the largest and oldest freshwater lake in the world. In the winter, the lake freezes, but the water is so clear that you can see 130 feet below the ice. In March, frost and sun cause cracks in the ice crust, which results in the turquoise ice shards we see at the surface.

2: Pamukkale Hot Springs, Turkey. Over millions of years, the hotsprings in Pamukkale have transformed the landscape. Although it may look like these terraces are made of ice and snow, Turkey has bikini weather all year round. The ground is just coated in white limestone.

3: Sentinels of the Arctic, Finland. These sentinels are actually giant trees covered in snow and ice. This strange sight occurs in winter, when temperatures range from -40 to -15 degrees centigrade.

4: Yuanyang County, China. The farming techniques in Yuanyang County have created a landscape which is truly amazing from the air. These rice fields are located on the slopes of Ailao Mountain, where the terraced levels help create flat surfaces along an uneven landscape.

5: Fly Geyser, Nevada, USA. Fly Geyser was accidentally created when a well was drilled and left uncapped. Minerals and algae started to rise from the geyser and accumulated to form an alien-like mound.

6: Grand Prismatic Hot Spring, Wyoming, USA. Grand Prismatic Hot Spring is the largest hot spring in the United States. The vivid colors in the spring are the result of pigmented bacteria, which grow around the edges of the mineral-rich water.

7: Underwater Waterfall, Mauritius Island. Strong ocean currents continually drive sand from the shores of Mauritius into the abyss below, creating this one-of-a-kind underwater waterfall.

8 & 9: Sea of Stars, Vaadhoo Island, Maldives. It may look normal during daylight, but at night, this beach comes to life. The sparkle in the water comes from marine microbes called phytoplankton. The galaxy they paint across the shore is nothing short of breathtaking.

10: Glowworm Caves, Waitomo, New Zealand. Thousands of tiny glowworms hang to the ceiling of this grotto and radiate a luminescent light, creating a scene straight out of a sci-fi movie.

Source

This picture was taken by Photographer Oren Jeffries while he was exploring some un-mapped area of the Grand Caverns(Virginia). Jeffries liked to use long exposure technique to catch anything without any light what so ever. While he was setting up for his snaps, he heard something in the distance which spooked him. He set off one of his Blitzlicht flashes he used for taking traditional photos underground and ran. In a later interview he gave to a local newspaper, he said that he saw “humanoid” figures looking back at him. A few days after that he went back with a few friends to retreive his box camera which had this picture recorded inside of it.

The world’s deepest, darkest, oldest, and quietest motel room is 220 feet underground, at Grand Canyon Caverns, in a 65-million-year-old cave. 

The largest, oldest, deepest, darkest, quietest, driest motel room in the world:

Largest: 200 feet by 400 feet with 70-foot ceiling
Oldest: Caverns and walls over 65 million years old
Deepest: 220 feet below the surfaces, accessed by elevator
Darkest: absent of any light
Quietest: the only sound is your heart beating and your breath. You are the only living thing in the caverns… The only living thing
Driest: zero humidity, nothing lives in the caverns, not a fly, not bat, nothing!

Source

7

a song of ice and fire. photos by einar rúnar sigurðsson from iceland’s vatnajokull ice caves, which lie bellow a 3,100 cubic kilometre glacier. formed as melt water from geothermal heat and summer temperatures carve through the ice flow, these caverns, subject to glacial motion, are constantly moving and changing shape, and can thus collapse in on explorers at any moment (killing one photographer in 2011). these photos were taken in winter, when the ice is more stable, but when temperatures inside the caves can drop to -120 celcius. (see also: previous posts on glaciospeleology and other caves)

2

The Holy Austin Rock Houses at Kinver Edge, England.

Occupied until the 1950s and thought by many to be the inspiration for J. R. R. Tolkien’s hobbit holes, the quarters of Holy Austin Rock are carved directly into the sandstone cliff, with the oldest chambers dating back to the arrival of Christianity in England around 700 AD.

Photographs by Andrew Whitman.