cavalry regiment

Roger Holder of the 11th ACR, 1967.

Holder was seriously wounded when a landmine hit his M113 APC. Later, after serving time for marijuana possession, he went AWOL. Then, in 1972, he hijacked a plane with his girlfriend.

From Wikipedia:

June 2, 1972: Western Airlines Flight 701 from Los Angeles to Seattle was hijacked by Willie Roger Holder, a Vietnam War veteran, and his girlfriend Catherine Marie Kerkow. The hijackers claimed they had a bomb in an attaché case and demanded $500,000 and that Angela Davis, who was then on trial, be freed. After allowing half the passengers to get off in San Francisco and the other half to get off in New York on a re-fueling stop, they flew on to Algeria, where they were granted political asylum, joining the International Section of the Black Panther Party. It was and still remains the longest-distance hijacking in American history. Later, $488,000 of the ransom money was returned to American officials.

The story of the hijacking is chronicled in Brendan Koerner’s book The Skies Belong to Us.

cannibalistic-midget  asked:

Hal Moore died my man

Lt. Gen. Harold Gregory “Hal” Moore, Jr. passed away on February 10, 2017, a few days short of his 95th birthday. 

He was the first of West Point class 1945 to be promoted to brigadier, major, and lieutenant general. He served in the military from 1945 to 1977. He served in Japan after WWII, until 1948. He made over 300 parachute jumps in the 82nd Airborne Division, 150 of which were in the Airborne Test Section with experimental parachutes.

He commanded a mortar company during the Korean War, because he was due for promotion to major – but the 7th Division’s commanding general had put a hold on any promotions without command of a company in combat. In 1954, he returned to West Point and was an instructor in infantry tactics, teaching then-cadet Norman Schwarzkopf, who called him one of his heroes, and cites Moore as the reason he chose the infantry branch. (Schwarzkopf led the UN coalition during OPERATION: DESERT STORM.) 

In 1964, now a lieutenant colonel, Moore completed the course of study at the Naval War College, earning a master’s degree in International Relations from my alma mater, George Washington University. He was transferred to Fort Benning and took command of the 2nd Battalion, 23rd Infantry, 11th Air Assault Division. In July they were redesignated the 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile) and deployed to Vietnam in September.

On November 14, 1965, he led the 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry of the 3rd Brigade, into the Battle of la Drang. encircled by the enemy with no clear landing zone that would allow them to leave, Moore persevered despited being significantly outnumbered by the NVA and VC – who would go on to defeat the 2nd Battalion, 7th Cavalry only a few miles away a day later. He was nicknamed ‘Yellow Hair’ due to his blond hair by his troops, as a homage to General Custer – who, as a lieutenant colnel, commanded the same 7th Cavalry Regiment at the Battle of the Little Bighorn just a century before. Though casualties were higher for the other parts of the battle of la Drang, Moore’s troops suffered 79 killed and 121 wounded. 634 NVA and VC bodies were found in the vicinity, with an estimated 1,215 killed by artillery and airstrikes in the area. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for his part of the battle, promoted to colonel, and took over command of the 3rd Brigade. 

In 1968, he was assigned by the Army to Harvard University to complete his M.A in international relations. On August 31, he was promoted to brigadier general, and then to major general in 1970. His assignment at the time was as assistant chief of staff of the Eighth Army in South Korea. He was charged by General Michaelis of the 7th ID to clean up a major drug abuse and racial strife problem. Moore established leadership schools for both officers and NCOs, and institted an ‘equal opportunity policy.’ He backed it up with punishments to those who discriminated based on race, ethnicity, or creed. 

In 1974 he was appointed deputy chief of staff for personnel, his last assignment. He dealt with army recruiting issues after the draft was terminated, as well as the drawdown of forces after the end of the Vietnam War. His next assignment was to become Commanding General, US Army Japan, but he retired instead. He left the Army on August 1, 1977, after 32 years of active service.

In 1992 Moore wrote We Were Soldiers Once… And Young with co-author Joseph L. Galloway. The book was adapted into the 2002 film We Were Soldiers, by Mel Gibson. It remains my absolute favorite Vietnam War movie.

Moore and Joseph L. Galloway have written another book together, a follow-up to their first collaboration. We Are Soldiers Still; A Journey Back to the Battlefields of Vietnam was published in 2008.

Here he is putting out the flag that his son, Col. David Moore, sent home from Afghanistan. Rest in peace, sir.

Lieutenant Andrew Finucane of the 10th (Prince of Wales’s Own) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons (Hussars)

By James Northcote, 1811.

From the collection of the National Army Museum.

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Paratroopers with 1st Squadron, 40th Cavalry Regiment, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, head toward an extraction point after a successful airborne operation in Deadhorse, Alaska, February 22, 2017. The battalion’s Arctic capabilities were tested as temperatures with wind chill reached as low as 63 below zero. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Daniel Love)

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Henry rifle

Designed by Benjamin T. Henry c.1857-60 based on the Volition and Volcanic repeating rifles, manufactured by New Haven Arms Co. c.1860-66 - serial number 3645.
.44RF Henry 16-round tubular magazine, lever action repeater, brass frame.

This is one of the few surviving example of an US ordinance Henry rifle purchased to arm the 1st D.C. Cavalry regiment. Most Henry rifles of the war were private purchases ; although expensive, its front-loaded magazine had an unmatched capacity for the time, earning him the reputation of being “a gun you load on Sunday and shoot all week long”.

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Sword of the Grenadiers à Cheval de la Garde Impériale dated early 19th Century on display at Walter Scott’s house in Abbotsford

Walter Scott was invited out to the battlefield by the Duke of Wellington after his victory. While he prepared his poetry on the defeat of Napoleon for the second time he collected a number of arms and armour from the French army.

This sword belonged to the heavy cavalry regiment of the Imperial Guard and the regiment sustained heavy losses at the Battle of Waterloo, where presumably this sword was acquired.

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  1. Imperial Russian Horse Guard Regiment officer’s tunic or ‘Koller’, circa 1900.

  2. Tsar Nicholas II’s officer uniform of Her Majesty Empress Maria Fyodorovna’s Cavalry Guards Regiment, circa 1900-1910.

  3. Officer’s uniform for a court ball worn by Tsar Nicholas II, circa 1900s.

  4. Uniform of Tsar Nicholas II in the form of an officer of the Life Guards Rifle Regiment of the imperial family, circa 1903.

  5. Imperial Russian military tunic, circa 1900.

  6. Model 1907 Imperial Russian WWI 2nd Lieutenant’s tunic of 'Kittel’