cat rescue

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I found this kitty in the street, so cold and hungry she was shivering, trying to figure out if she could eat a cigarette butt. I brought her inside, fed her, got her nice and warm, and now she’s the happiest girl alive??

Can anyone in the NYC area give her a home? We have two cats already, and as much as I’d love to keep her, we don’t really have room for a third. She looks about 4-5 months old, and seems perfectly healthy, other than being underweight: although of course a visit to the vet would not go amiss! She is MISSING HER TAIL, it is just a little two inch nub that wiggles around furiously and is the Cutest Goddamned Thing I’ve ever seen.

Here’s what I can tell you about her after looking after her for a couple of days: she is curious and affectionate, eager to bond with any human who looks her way. She is comfortable being picked up. She is very gentle: even when playing, there are no teeth or claws! She is timid of other cats, but not aggressive or terrified, so I think with a little patience she could definitely be a happy part of a multi-kitty home.

Please be her Christmas miracle! I really don’t want to have to bring her to a shelter. This little girl has been through enough, and deserves to have a home for the holidays.

UPDATE 12/18: Lil MOCHA has gone to her new home! Thank you so much to everyone who helped to spread the word about this kitty who needed a miracle. The temperature dropped here in NYC right after we took her in, down to the teens, and she might not have made it through the week. But now she’s gone to the home of a loving cat mom who lost her own kitty to old age less than a month ago; so I think she needed Mocha as much as Mocha needed her! 

I am going to miss her, but I know she will be ridiculously happy in her new home. Happy holidays, everybody!

Tonight’s destresser is a mojito. So my Sunday consisted of:

Volunteer shelter work. Per the norm on Sundays. Morning walk and clean cages. Chill till night walks and clean cages if needed and also feed. Good workouts, given that it takes about an hour to walk everyone, pick up 40lb litter bags, 50lb goat feed, etc.

Saw Logan and cried like a baby. Lol

Caught up on Supernatural. Still can’t believe they got Lucille into the show. Wonder how much legal loopholes they spinned with The Walking Dead lawyers on that 1 small scene. Lol

Cold and wet here. And by cold, it’s 52. Lol I used to sweat in 52.

Gonna catch up on msgs. Bad service in the country so I lag behind

Still haven’t meal prepped. I will later tonight. This week will be a squash and cucumber salad with raspberry vinegrette

Hi everyone,

As of right now, we think we’ve found a home for the kitten!  He’s currently being boarded until tomorrow, and tomorrow we’ll pick him up and take him back up with us toward the middle part of the state, where we’ve arranged to hand him off to a fantastic lady who’s going to give him a wonderful life.

The response to our call for help has been overwhelming.  Thank you all so much:  for reblogging, for boosting, for the outpouring of love.  We thank you.  More importantly, he thanks you.  Just two nights ago he was alone.  Now look at him.  Look at his future!

Thank you all so much.

<3,
Yamino and Ash

Why foster a cat?


“Fostering a cat is not a lifetime commitment, it is a commitment to saving a life.”

This is the watchword of cat rescues everywhere.

To foster a cat is, quite simply, to save that cat’s life. A foster home provides this same cat with a safe, temporary place of refuge until he/she is ultimately placed in a permanent, adoptive home.

Most rescues rely solely on a network of dedicated, volunteer foster homes, and could not survive without them. And rescues NEVER have enough foster homes.

Why? Because there are more cats in need than there are foster homes available to meet that need.

There are many benefits to fostering, many pleasant surprises and many unexpected rewards. Foster parents, past and present, describe it as one of the most memorable and gratifying experiences of their lives.

Fostering is both a way of enriching the lives of the cats and people involved, and a constructive way for people to give back to their communities. Fostered cats can provide endless hours of entertainment and love for their humans, and provide invaluable life lessons for adults and children alike.

By taking a deserving cat into their home, fosters increase that cat’s chances of being adopted. Foster families have the time and the ability to transform their foster cat – through one-on-one contact, exercise, feeding and training – into a happy and well mannered companion pet any person or family would be proud to call their own.

Fostering provides a needy cat with a stable environment, coupled with love, attention and affection. While the foster family provides the food, the rescue usually provides everything else, including payment of all medical costs to ensure the cat’s ongoing health and well-being.

Fosters are the essential eyes and ears of rescue. By spending every day with their foster cat, fosters will learn all they can about his/her particular personality. They will be able to identify any behavioral issues that need to be addressed, then work on addressing them.

If fosters already have a cat – either their own or another foster – in residence, all the better. The more animals their foster cat meets, the more socialized he/she will become, the more easily he/she will handle stress, and the more relaxed he/she will be around strangers.

For those who have never owned a cat, fostering provides them with the unique
opportunity of seeing whether they themselves are suited for permanent “pet parenthood.”

But fostering a cat is NOT a form of trial adoption for that particular cat. There is even a term for it: foster failure. The most successful fosters are those who, despite being emotionally invested, know that they are essentially a stepping stone towards their foster cat’s future. And that as one successfully fostered cat leaves their home,  another needy and deserving cat is waiting to enter it.

Ultimately, then, fostering a cat saves not just one life, but two.

Article written by Nomi Berger.