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On Earning the Favor of Hunters: Do’s and Don’ts

DO:

1) Compliment their cloak

In the wild, Hunters often bond via social grooming; well-timed flattery can encourage an otherwise antisocial hunter to engage. As they tend to perform better when confident, this is also a useful battlefield tactic.

2) Pick up the tab

Hunter social dynamics are built upon a complex system of favor-trading, posturing, and outright lies and bribery. The gesture of paying for a bar tab is a good way to ingrain yourself with the “Pack.”

TIP: lay ground rules early and be wary of semantic traps before offering, otherwise you may find yourself with empty pockets. For example, say “Your next drink is on me, if you order the same thing you just had within the next thirty seconds” vs. “Drinks are on me.”

3) Encourage healthy competition

Hunters are often motivated by the opportunity to show up Warlocks. If there is a Hunter on your fireteam, suggest low-stake wagers or other competitions to instill in your Hunter the desire to act. Otherwise, they may be reluctant to engage in group activities or patrols, and can become less inclined to socialize in the future. In extreme cases, a poorly-socialized Hunter can grow sulky and lazy. Intentionally losing on occasion will inspire your Hunter to double down on their attempts to outdo your successes.


DON’T:

1) Express outright disbelief

Asking for a story is an excellent way to ingratiate yourself with a Hunter, and most story-tellers respect healthy skepticism about their tall tales, as this gives them an opportunity for further posturing. Be wary, however, of outright disbelief. Responses are unpredictable, and range wildly between Hunters: back-slapping good humor is relatively common, but so is immediate violence and the occasional mating proposition. 

2) Offer anything for free

Favors and verbal bartering, while a necessary element of Hunter interaction, must be granted judiciously. It should be made clear that, even if you do not expect immediate repayment in kind, you do expect the favor to be returned. For example, taking on a part of a Hunter’s workload without establishing that you expect to be recompensed somehow, at some point in the future (remember to clarify terms as you deem necessary), is a good way to both lose the respect of your Hunter and encourage bad behavior. Remember: you must work hard early on to instill good habits in your Hunter.

3) Make a promise without knowing what you’re promising

On a similar note, never accept a verbal contract before you are completely certain what your Hunter is requesting of you. For example, on the subject of favors, the proper response to a Hunter asking if you will “Do [them] a favor” is not “Yes.” It is: “What did you have in mind?”

It is important to stay vigilant: even such throwaway terms as “Sure, I’ll help” can be construed as binding. Breaking a promise carries a serious stigma in Hunter society, and is a good way to find yourself ostracized or worse.

4) Insult their knives

This will end poorly.

- A Warlock’s Guide to Hunters // Anonymous

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