carter-magazine

Today In History We Honor Dorothy Dandridge

‘Dorothy Dandridge was an American actress and popular singer, and was the first African American to be nominated for an Academy Award for best actress. Dorothy sang at Harlem’s Cotton Club and Apollo Theater.’

(photo: Dorothy Dandridge)

- CARTER Magazine

Portraits + Podcast: Startups At Starbucks With Queon Martin

A REVEAL AGENCY® PRODUCTION 

Disclaimer: The brand content is in no affiliation with Starbucks. 

#StartupsAtStarbucks™ is a project created by The REVEAL Agency for the sole purpose of profiling entrepreneurs who spend their time in Starbucks creating their businesses. Our first entrepreneur profile is Queon Martin, Founder/Creative Director of Cartermagazine.

Name: Queon Martin, better known as “Q”… Found and Creative Director for CARTER™ Magazine and Albee™. Both are social businesses… CARTER™ Magazine being in media and Albee™ being in fashion. 

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August 5, 2015

Today We Honor Samuel L. Jackson

‘Respectfully labeled as one of the hardest working actors in Hollywood, Jackson is an undisputed star, demonstrated by the fact that his films have grossed more money in box office sales than any other actor in the history of filmmaking.

Jackson made an indelible mark on American cinema with his portrayal of ‘Jules’, the philosophizing hitman, in Quentin Tarantino’s “Pulp Fiction.”  In addition to unanimous critical acclaim for his performance, he received Academy Award and Golden Globe nominations for Best Supporting Actor and won the British Academy of Film and Television Arts award.’ via samuelljackson.com

(photo: Samuel L. Jackson)

- CARTER Magazine

Today In History

‘Harriet Tubman, abolitionist, author, and engineer of the Underground Railroad, led Union Army guerillas into South Carolina and freed nearly 800 slaves on this date June 2 1863. Tubman was the first woman in U.S. history to command an armed military raid.’

“I freed a thousand slaves I could have freed a thousand more if only they knew they were slaves.” - Harriet Tubman

(photo: Harriet Tubman)

- CARTER Magazine

Today In History We Honor Jean-Michel Basquiat

“Underlying Jean-Michel Basquiat’s sense of himself as an artist was his innate capacity to function as something like an oracle, distilling his perceptions of the outside world down to their essence and in turn, projecting them outward through his creative acts.” via basquiat.com

“Believe it or not, I can actually draw.” Jean-Michel Basquiat

(photo: Jean-Michel Basquiat by Jerome Schlomoff)

- CARTER Magazine

February 21, 2015

Today In History

‘Nina Simone, entertainer known as the “High Priestess of Soul,” was born in Tryon, NC, on this date February 21, 1933. Simone recorded the highly acclaimed “I Love You Porgy” in 1959.’

“So while you’re imitating Al Capone, I’ll be Nina Simone and defacating on your microphone” - Lauryn Hill/Ready or Not

(photo: Nina Simone)

- CARTER Magazine

December 24, 2014

Today We Honor Sojourner Truth

Sojourner Truth was born in 1797 on the Colonel Johannes Hardenbergh estate in Swartekill, a Dutch settlement in upstate New York. She was born to Elizabeth and James Baumfree, also slaves on the Hardenbergh plantation. She spoke only Dutch until she suffered cruel treatment at the hands of a later master, she learned to speak English quickly, but had a Dutch accent for the rest of her life. Her book, The Narrative of Sojourner Truth: A Northern Slave allowed Sojourner to tour and speak to woman across the nation. In 1854, at the Ohio Woman’s Rights Convention in Akron, Ohio, she gave her most famous, “Ain’t I a Woman?” speech :

“That man over there says that women need to be helped into carriages, and lifted over ditches, and to have the best place everywhere. Nobody ever helps me into carriages, or over mud puddles, or gives me any best place, and ain’t I a woman? … I have plowed, and planted, and gathered into barns, and no man could head me — and ain’t I a woman? I could work as much and eat as much as a man (when I could get it), and bear the lash as well — and ain’t I a woman? I have borne thirteen children and seen most all sold off to slavery and when I cried out with my mother’s grief, none but Jesus heard me — and ain’t I woman?”

(photo: Sojourner Truth)

- CARTER Magazine

Today We Celebrate President Barack Obama

As you close out the last year of your presidency, we at CARTER™ Magazine would like to wish you first and foremost a Happy Birthday Mr. President.

Second we want to thank you for all you’ve accomplish in the eight years you served as our President of The United States. We may never understand what is feels like to be the head of a country, however you accomplished a feet that brought us closer to the possibility of accomplishing any goals we set forth in life, because you raised the bar of HOPE.

Your legacy has just begun, as we know your next best step forward will be the light that enlighten us all, to bring forth the United States of America we seek, is in arms reach.

- CARTER Magazine

Today In History

Aaliyah Dana Haughton, singer and film actress, was born in Brooklyn, NY, on this date January 16, 1979. Aaliyah started voice lessons shortly after she learned to talk. Determined to be a star, she signed a contract with Jive Records at the age of 12 and came to popular acclaim in 1994 with her debut album, Age Ain’t Nothing But a Number. Produced by the successful singer R. Kelly, the album quickly sold a million copies and eventually earned platinum status based largely on the success of two hit singles, “Back and Forth” and “At Your Best (You Are Love).”

While a student in the dance program at Detroit High School for the Fine and Performing Arts (she graduated in 1997), Aaliyah released her sophomore album, One in a Million (1996). Helmed by the well-known pop producer Timbaland and featuring rap performer Missy “Misdemeanor” Elliott, One in a Million portrayed the 17-year-old singer as a sultry hip-hop chanteuse with a self-confidence well beyond her years. The album garnered favorable reviews and sold two million copies.

In 2000, Aaliyah made her acting debut in the surprise action hit Romeo Must Die, starring opposite martial arts star Jet Li in a Romeo and Juliet-inspired story set in modern-day Los Angeles. She was also an executive producer of the movie’s soundtrack and performed the hit single “Try Again,” which netted her a second Grammy nomination as well as two MTV Music Video Awards for Best Female Video and Best Video From a Film.

Her third album, Aaliyah, was released in July 2001 and reached No. 2 on the Billboard album chart. Also in 2001, she played the title role in Queen of the Damned, based on the bestselling novel by Anne Rice and set for release in 2002. She scored a major casting coup when she signed to appear in two upcoming sequels to the blockbuster sci-fi thriller The Matrix, starring Keanu Reeves and Laurence Fishburne.

Tragically, Aaliyah was killed on August 25, 2001, when a small Cessna passenger plane carrying the singer and her video crew crashed in the Bahamas, where they had just completed work on a video. She is survived by her parents, Diane and Michael Haughton, and an older brother, Rashaad. via bio

- CARTER Magazine

January 17, 2015

Today In history

Eartha Kit was born on this date January 17, 1927 in South Carolina. Eartha Kitt became popular in Paris as a nightclub singer, then returned to the U.S. to appear in films and on Broadway. Her 1953 recording of “Santa Baby” is still a favorite today. In the 1960s, Kitt had a recurring role as Catwoman on TV’s Batman

(photo: Eartha Kit)

- CARTER Magazine