carter-magazine

Today In History

‘Jackie Robinson, the first Black baseball player in the major leagues, was born in Cairo, GA, on this date January 31, 1919. Robinson joined the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947, ending five decades of segregated baseball. At the time of his retirement in October 1972, Robinson is believed to have been the most respected of all baseball players.’

(photo: Jackie Robinson)

- CARTER Magazine

Today We Celebrate President Barack Obama

As you close out the last year of your presidency, we at CARTER™ Magazine would like to wish you first and foremost a Happy Birthday Mr. President.

Second we want to thank you for all you’ve accomplish in the eight years you served as our President of The United States. We may never understand what is feels like to be the head of a country, however you accomplished a feet that brought us closer to the possibility of accomplishing any goals we set forth in life, because you raised the bar of HOPE.

Your legacy has just begun, as we know your next best step forward will be the light that enlighten us all, to bring forth the United States of America we seek, is in arms reach.

- CARTER Magazine

Today In History We Honor Sly Stone

‘Sly and the Family Stone are credited as one of the first racially integrated bands in music history, belting their message of peace, love and social consciousness through a string of hit anthems that fused R&B, soul, funk and rock n roll. On 'Different Strokes by Different Folks’ a stylistically, culturally and racially disparate group of chart-toppers mirrors that idealistic diversity.’ via slystonemusic.com

(photo: Sly Stone)

- CARTER Magazine

Today In History We Honor Julian Bond

‘Julian Bond has been an activist in the civil rights, economic justice, and peace movements since his college years. In 1960, Bond helped found the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and earlier that year, he helped create the Atlanta University student civil rights organization, which directed several years of nonviolent protests and won integration of Atlanta’s movie theaters, lunch counters, and parks. Bond served 20 years in the Georgia House and Georgia Senate, drafting more than 60 bills that became law. He was president of the Atlanta branch of the NAACP for 11 years and in 1998, was elected chair of the NAACP national board and served for 11 terms until stepping down in 2010.’

(photo: Julian Bond)

- CARTER Magazine

Today In History

‘Harriet Tubman, abolitionist, author, and engineer of the Underground Railroad, led Union Army guerillas into South Carolina and freed nearly 800 slaves on this date June 2 1863. Tubman was the first woman in U.S. history to command an armed military raid.’

“I freed a thousand slaves I could have freed a thousand more if only they knew they were slaves.” - Harriet Tubman

(photo: Harriet Tubman)

- CARTER Magazine

Today In History We Honor Charles Drew

‘As a noted surgeon and scientist, Charles Drew was responsible for creating the technology to store blood for long periods of time. His lifelong concern for the necessary transport and storage of blood and plasma made him a pioneer in his field and a valued scientist in world history. Drew saved thousands of soldiers’ lives in World War Two, when he developed his technology and techniques during the Battle of Britain; and millions more since then.’

(photo: Charles Drew)

- CARTER Magazine

Today In History We Honor Madam C. J. Walker

‘Born Sarah Breedlove on a Delta, Louisiana plantation, this daughter of former slaves transformed herself from an uneducated farm laborer and laundress into one of the twentieth century’s most successful, self-made women entrepreneurs.

“I got my start by giving myself a start.” - Madam C.J. Walker

(photo: Madam C.J. Walker)

- CARTER Magazine

Today In History We Honor Charles Hamilton Houston

‘Charles Hamilton Houston was a prominent African American lawyer, Dean of Howard University Law School, and NAACP Litigation Director who played a significant role in dismantling the Jim Crow laws, which earned him the title The Man Who Killed Jim Crow. He is also well known for having trained future Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall.’

(photo: Charles Hamilton Houston)

- CARTER Magazine