caroline princess of wales and princess charlotte

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Princess Charlotte of Wales and Prince Leopold of Saxe-Coburg, were married on this day, May 2nd, in 1816.

Princess Charlotte was, at the time, the only legitimate grandchild of George III. She was the daughter of the Prince of Wales (The future George IV) and his long estranged wife, Caroline of Brunswick. Prince Leopold had been her choice of a groom; her father had been pushing her to marry William, Prince of Orange. Charlotte said of Leopold before their marriage that:

I find him charming, and go to bed happier than I have ever done yet in my life … I am certainly a very fortunate creature, & have to bless God. A Princess never, I believe, set out in life (or married) with such prospects of happiness, real domestic ones like other people.

The couple were married at 9 o'clock at night, inside the Crimson Drawing Room at Carlton House. Leopold dressed as a British General, and Charlotte wore a delicate silver empire style gown, decorated with silver embroidery.

The couple were devoted to one another, with Leopold proving to be a calming influence on the wild and rambunctious Charlotte. Sadly, their happiness was not to last long. After suffering a miscarriage early in the marriage, Charlotte died giving birth to a stillborn son, on November 5th, 1817.

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January 7, 1796 – Birth of Princess Charlotte of Wales

The family at Windsor had to wait another three days for news of the happy event which came in a brief note from the Prince of Wales dated Carlton House, 9.45 a.m., 7 January 1796. ’The Princess,’ he wrote to his mother, ’after terrible hard labour for above twelve hours, is this instant brought to bed of an immense girl, and I assure you notwithstanding we might have wish’d for a boy, I receive her with all the affection possible, and bow with due defference and resignation to the decrees of Providence… Pray have the goodness to apologize to my dear sisters for my not writing to them, but I am so fatigued that I can only sign myself.‘ 

As the fashionable and respectable world flocked to pay its respects in proper form at Carlton House, within the family circle there was much relief an some genuine pleasure. The Queen begged her congratulations, ’and a kiss to the young lady’. Princess Elizabeth added heartfelt wishes that ’every blessing and happiness may attend my (already) dear little niece’, and the King was delighted, ’the dear King’, reported Princess Elizabeth two days later, ’talks of nothing but his grandchild, drank her health at dinner and went into the Equerries room and made drink it in a bumper.’ Thursday 11 February in the Great Drawing-Room at St James’s Palace. Here the baby was baptized by the same Archbishop of Canterbury who had married her parents ten months previously and given the names Charlotte Augusta after her grandmothers, who were also godmothers.

 Caroline & Charlotte by Alison Plowden

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Queens of England + Caroline of Brunswick (1768-1821)

Caroline was born in 1768, the daughter of Charles William, Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, and Princess Augusta of Great Britain. She was taught to understand to English and French but otherwise her education was lacking. According to her mother, Princess Augusta, all German princesses learned English in the hope that they would be chosen to marry George, Prince of Wales. The Prince of Wales was Caroline’s first cousin as Augusta was the eldest sister of George III.

Caroline was engaged to the Prince of Wales in 1794, never having met him. He only agreed to marry her because he was heavily in debt and Parliament would increase his allowance if he married an eligible princess. The couple was unimpressed with each other from their first meeting. They were married in April 1795 at the Chapel Royal, St. James’ Palace. He was drunk at the ceremony, and hypocritically claimed she was not a virgin when they married, even though he had already been secretly married to Maria Fitzherbert.

Less than a year after the wedding in January 1796, Caroline gave birth to Princess Charlotte Augusta, who would be George’s only legitimate child. Days after Charlotte’s birth, George made a new will in which he left everything to Maria Fitzherbert and left one shilling to Caroline. Gossip was rampant about the troubled marriage and George was vilified while Caroline was portrayed as a wronged wife. She was openly cheered in public and gained plaudits for her charming familiarity and easy nature. He desired a separation and by August 1797, Caroline was living in her own private residence.

In 1806, a commission known as the “Delicate Investigation” was set up to examine Caroline on claims of infidelity and an illegitimate child. In the end it was determined that there was no foundation for the allegations but during the investigation Caroline was not allowed to see her daughter. George increased restrictions on seeing Charlotte when he became Regent in 1811, and Caroline fought back with a propaganda campaign supported by most of the public and her daughter. Jane Austen wrote of Caroline, “Poor woman, I shall support her as long as I can, because she is a Woman and because I hate her Husband.“

Unhappy with her situation in Britain, Caroline left in 1814 and moved to Italy. It was there in 1817 that she found out that her daughter had died in childbirth. She only found out from a passing courier because George refused to write to her. She became Queen of Great Britain in January 1820 when her husband succeeded his father as George IV. After another failed investigation into Caroline’s alleged adultery, George tried to divorce her through a bill in Parliament. However, he was so unpopular that the bill was withdrawn by the Tory government.

Caroline remained immensely popular with the public until her death in August 1821. Her popularity was such that it was decided her funeral procession should avoid London so it wouldn’t spark public unrest. This plain failed when the crowd accompanying the procession rebelled against this changed route and forced the procession through the city. She was eventually buried in Brunswick Cathedral. (x)

‘EW OMG THEY ARE LIKE COUSINS ITS DISGUSTING’

As were the following: 

  • Emperor Franz Joseph and Elisabeth in Bayern

  • Charles V holy roman emperor and Isabella of Portugal 

  • Charles IV of Spain and Maria Louisa of Parma 

  • Christian VII of Denmark and Princess Caroline Mathilda of Wales

  • Christian VIII of Denmark and Duchess Charlotte Frederica of Mecklenburg Schwerin

  • Francis II, Holy Roman Emperor and Princess Maria Theresa of Naples and Sicily (double cousins actually) - after that he married his other cousin Maria Ludovika of Austria
  • William II of Prussia and Elisabeth Christine of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel (also double first cousins)

  • Olav V of Norway and Princess Märtha of Sweden

  • George I of Great Britain and Duchess Sophia Dorothea of Brunswick-Celle
  • George IV of the United Kingdom and Princess Caroline of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel

  • Haakon VII of Norway and Princess Maud of Wales

  • Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom and Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha

  • Isabella II of Spain and Francis, Duke of Cádiz

  • John II of Portugal and Eleanor of Viseu

  • John III of Portugal and Catherine of Austria 

  • Nero Ceasar and Julia
-Leopold I
  • Holy Roman Emperor and Margarita Teresa of Spain

  • Napoleon Louis Bonaparte and Charlotte Napoléone Bonaparte

  • William III of the Netherlands and Princess Sophie of Württemberg

  • William III of England and Mary II of England

  • etc
-etc…

Up until early 20th century this happened ALL THE TIME. It was normal and accepted. These are examples of famous european royals only and there are so many more. it can get boring so I left it at the european royals but the Japanese and Chinese did it too and there are non Royal examples: Darwin was married to his cousin, and Igor Stravinsky too. 

You know, some of these people hold some really beautiful love stories. Some of the greatest of their time. Some of them hated each other, some of them did not want to get married, some married for love. Yes - they fell in love with their cousin and wanted to be married, Queen Victoria proposed to Prince Albert herself, loving him for the rest of her life. 

Point is, I am a little done with everyone pretending to vomit at the idea of cousins getting married. If this disgusts you please find some other show to watch (tip: not the Borgias) cause this is Game of Thrones, set in some medieval world. There are so much more disgusting things in this show then people shipping cousins. How about a man who could have been her father forcing himself on a fifteen year old? How about what happened to Theon? How about Drogo and Dany post the sex lessons (I hated that storyline so much)? What Ramsay did to Sansa? Joffrey killing whores cause he could? That time a baby was killed cause he was Robert’s bastard? Also, aunt-nephew marriage happened much much less and they share much more DNA (looking at you JonxDany shippers) so don’t go ‘they never met before so its not that bad’ on me when I ask how you can think Jonsa is gross and still be capable of shipping Jon with his aunt. 

If you think its wrong cause they grew up together, fine, I’ll say you have a valid point there, I will accept that argument at all times (discussion for another time) but stop the bitching about the cousins thing cause it is actually pretty disrespectful to some of the people mentioned above. (I like to think I am defending JonxArya here too, despite my incapability to see that as anything but sibling love). Cousins have just 1 to 2 percent higher chance of having an unhealthy child, just to clear that up - unlike, as I have said, auntxnephew. Plus, well, considering what the Targaryens liked to do, Jon and Dany share a ridiculous amount of DNA. 

Also, Ned Stark’s parents were cousins and Tywin Lannister was married to his cousin so there is the proof you need that in Westeros, just like in Europe for many many centuries, it is perfectly ok to marry the child of your parents sibling. Don’t get me started on the Targaryens, THAT is gross. Not this:

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→ November 6, 1817 – Death of Princess Charlotte of Wales in childbirth

Princess Charlotte’s death after giving birth to a still-born son on November 5, 1817 elicited a national outpouring of grief that was unprecedented in Britain, and her funeral drew massive mourning crowds on a scale similar to those who thronged to Princess Diana’s funeral in 1997. In stark contrast to her father, the Prince Regent, who was universally despised, the young princess was extremely popular, and her pregnancy was closely followed by an enthusiastic public. Charlotte, the only child of George, Prince of Wales (later Prince Regent and George IV) by his wife Caroline of Brunswick, had been married a mere seventeen months before to Prince Leopold of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha amid pomp and splendor. A dutiful young Regency wife, she became pregnant almost immediately, but suffered two miscarriages before carrying her third child to full term. Though her grandfather, George III, had 7 sons and 5 daughters, Charlotte was the only legitimate grandchild. Thus this pregnancy was a truly significant one.

Charlotte  began her pregnancy as a healthy and robust young woman, but after months of blood-letting and a strict diet, an accepted medical practice prescribed by her physician, Sir Richard Croft, she grew feeble. Her death after her tortuous two-day, 50-hour labor would precipitate a new age in medicine, ending arch-conservatism in obstetrics. At the time that Princess Charlotte gave birth there were two schools of medical thought in delivering a baby: intervention and non-intervention. During the previous century, anatomical knowledge about the birth process increased. Henrick Van Deventer showed that the female pelvis was unyielding during labor, and forceps were introduced. Intervention during labor was still crude, largely consisting of extracting the baby with forceps during a breech birth in order to save the mother’s life. A cesarean section, which might have saved the baby, would surely have resulted in Princess Charlotte’s death.

Princess Charlotte’s physician had married the daughter of a prominent physician who had trained him and who belonged to the non-intervention school of obstetrics. On the evening of November 3, the Princess’s water broke. Although Dr. Croft had accurately diagnosed a breech birth, he decided not to use forceps during the first stage of labor. He also did not administer pain killers. Prince Leopold was so concerned about his wife’s labor that he rarely left her side.

After 50 hours, Princess Charlotte delivered a stillborn 9-pound son. His head had been in a sideways position and was too large for her pelvis. After the delivery Charlotte seemed to do well at first, and she was even given some port wine to drink after two days without food (she mentioned later that the alcohol made her tipsy), but after several hours she became restless, had difficulty breathing, and her pulse became rapid and feeble. She developed malaise and weakness, followed by somnolence then agitation, with progressive worsening and death. Five and half hours after her delivery she died from post partum haemorrhage and shock. Three months after this event, Sir Richard Croft committed suicide, unable to live with the resulting criticism and the knowledge that he had been responsible for the two deaths. 

Two generations gone—gone in a moment! I have felt for myself, but I have also felt for the prince regent. My Charlotte is gone from the country—it has lost her. She was a good, she was an admirable woman. None could know my Charlotte as I did know her. It was my study, my duty, to know her character, but it was also my delight. – Prince Leopold to Sir Thomas Lawrence after the death of his wife.

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197 years ago today, May 24th, at 4:15 in the morning, a baby girl was born in this room inside of Kensington Palace. She was the first, and ultimately only, child of Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn and his wife Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld. She was given the name Alexandria Victoria; her first name after one of her godparents, Alexander I of Russia, and her second name after her mother.

The Princess’ birth was the result of a succession crisis in the United Kingdom. Of the many sons of George III and Queen Charlotte, only  one had produced a legitimate child. George, Prince of Wales (The future George IV) had fathered a daughter, Princess Charlotte, but she had died two years before in childbirth. George had long been estranged from his wife, Caroline of Brunswick, since even before Charlotte was born and there was no hope of him having another child with her. This led his remaining brothers to abandon their mistresses and scramble about Europe looking for respectable Princesses that they could marry and have legitimate heirs with.

After both of her Uncle-Kings (George IV and William IV) died, neither having left behind a legitimate child, the little princess born in Kensington Palace came to the throne as Queen Victoria.

She would go on to rule the United Kingdom for sixty three years and two hundred sixteen days, giving her name to an Era and becoming the second longest reigning female monarch in history. The record was only broken recently by the current Queen, and her great-great granddaughter, Elizabeth II.

On this day in history, January 7th, in 1796, Princess Charlotte Augusta of Wales was born. She was the only child of the future George IV and his wife, Caroline of Brunswick.

George and Caroline infamously hated one another, and he would later insist they had only ever had sexual intercourse three times; twice on their wedding night and once the night after. Charlotte was born almost exactly 9 months after her parents’ wedding, which had taken place on April 8th of the previous year.

As the only living and legitimate grandchild of George III, Charlotte was second in line to the throne after her father. She was expected to someday become Queen of the United Kingdom, but sadly it was not to be.

She was married to Prince Leopold of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld in 1816, when she was 20 years old. Early in their marriage she suffered a miscarriage, but it was announced she was pregnant again in April of 1817.

After two days of labour, she gave birth to a large stillborn son on November 5th, 1817. Complications from the delivery caused her own death in the early morning hours of the following day.

The entire kingdom went into heavy mourning after her death, she had been greatly beloved and was one of the only popular members of the Royal Family. Her death caused a scramble among the remaining unmarried sons of George III to produce a legitimate child and heir to the throne.

Prince Edward, the Duke of Kent, would be the one to father the eventual heir, the future Queen Victoria. Had Charlotte lived, Victoria would never have existed and England’s “Victorian Era” as we know it would have been completely different.

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195 years ago today, May 24th, at 4:15 in the morning, a baby girl was born in this room inside of Kensington Palace. She was the first, and ultimately only, child of Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn and his wife Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld. She was given the name Alexandria Victoria; her first name after one of her godparents, Alexander I of Russia, and her second name after her mother.

The Princess’ birth was the result of a succession crisis in the United Kingdom. Of the many sons of George III and Queen Charlotte, only  one had produced a legitimate child. George, Prince of Wales (The future George IV) had fathered a daughter, Princess Charlotte, but she had died two years before in childbirth. George had long been estranged from his wife, Caroline of Brunswick, since even before Charlotte was born and there was no hope of him having another child with her. This led his remaining brothers to abandon their mistresses and scramble about Europe looking for respectable Princesses that they could marry and have legitimate heirs with.

After both of her Uncle-Kings (George IV and William IV) died, neither having left behind a legitimate child, the little princess born in Kensington Palace came to the throne as Queen Victoria.

She would go on to rule the United Kingdom for sixty three years and two hundred sixteen days, giving her name to an Era and becoming the second longest reigning female monarch in history, the record recently having been broken by the current Queen, and her great-great granddaughter, Elizabeth II.