carnival-art

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The Butterfly Circus Prints

This is the first set of prints in the shoppe’s new series of artwork entitled the Butterfly Circus. We have Milan the girl on the trapeze, Henriette and Sophie the ballerinas, Melyna the girl on the ropes, Til and Sil the acrobats,  Pearl on the hoops, Bex and Boots the Paper-Doll Siamese twins, and Lily and Lilac the twin tumblers. You can see all of our ordering options for these prints on our site here.

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“Fancy Animal Carnival” 19 Large Scale Whimsical Sculptures By Taiwanese Artist Hung Yi at  San Francisco Civic Center Through May 2, 2015

One of Taiwan’s most acclaimed contemporary artists, Hung Yi (洪易),  brings his large scale whimsical sculptures to San Francisco in a temporary art installation entitled “Fancy Animal Carnival” at San Francisco’s Civic Center Plaza from April 19 to May 2, 2015. Curator and project manager for the San Francisco installation is Cathy Hsu (許芳瑜). The exhibit of 19 large-scale, vividly colored animals, is free and open to the public, spread across the Joseph L. Alioto Performing Arts Piazza on the eastern front of San Francisco City Hall.

“We are thrilled to host this exceptional artwork exhibit in the heart of our City where it can be enjoyed by residents and visitors alike,” said San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee. “Meaningful cultural exchanges of artwork from around the world keep San Francisco at the cutting edge of innovation and artistic expression, and we are proud to be the temporary home of the Fancy Animal Carnival.”

“These playfully contorted animals are imbued with Taiwanese cultural elements,” said Ou Hsien Cheng (歐賢政), Director of Taipai’s InSian Gallery, producer of the exhibit here in San Francisco and also a major sponsor of the Swinging Skirts tournament.  “Hung Yi’s sculpture is enthusiastic and bold, and replete with the dynamism of Taiwanese culture. As innovation continues in the Taiwanese art world, Hung’s stunning creations are worthy of applause and continue to highlight classical elegance.”

“San Francisco is renowned for its public art,” says San Francisco Arts Commission Director of Cultural Affairs Tom DeCaigny. “In recent years, our Civic Center has become the stage for some of the most ambitious temporary art installations the city has ever seen by some of the world’s most celebrated artists. These installations excite locals and visitors alike and help bring economic activity to the area. We are grateful to Hung Yi and InSian Gallery for choosing San Francisco.”

“San Francisco Recreation and Parks welcomes public art in our parks as it often brings an intellectually stimulating atmosphere to our open space,” said Phil Ginsburg, SF Rec and Park General Manager.  “Mr. Hung Yi’s work definitely enhances the cultural diversity of our beautiful City.”

Born in 1970, Taichung, Taiwan, Hung Yi was once an owner of nine restaurants. However,  at the age of 30, he decided to live his life fully as an artist following attention for his work during the “Stock 20 in Taichung Railway Station” exhibit in 2002. Since then, his work continues to be inspired by his surroundings and life experiences. Typical of a Hung Yi creation are bright primary colors and bold, lively constructions. Hung Yi has also gained notoriety for the paradoxical dichotomy of his work that employs traditional motifs juxtaposed with hints of the spectacle of modern visual culture.