caregiver problems

Being a little with big boobs

·Bouncing can get painful
·Hanging upside down means suffocation
·Button-up onesies don’t stay together
·BRAS
·It can ruin little space
·Its hard to sleep on your tummy like a baby
·They get in your way!
·Not really being able to control clevagy clothing, which can make daddy mad
·Going braless is a hard decision

At least daddy likes them…

What is Attachment Disorder?

Attachment disorder is where a child or adult is unable to form normal healthy attachments. This is usually due to detrimental early life experiences - such as neglect, abuse, separation from their parents or primary caregivers (after six months of age and before three years of age), frequent change of caregivers, and lack of responsiveness from their caregivers.

Symptoms vary depending on age. In adults, they fall under one of two categories – either avoidant or anxious/ ambivalent personalities. These are summarized below.

1. Avoidant

· Intense anger and hostility

· Hypercritical of others

· Extremely sensitive to criticism, correction or blame

· Lacks empathy

· Sees others as untrustworthy and unreliable

· Either sees themselves as being unlovable or “too good” for others

· Relationships are experienced as either being too threatening or requiring too much effort

· Fear of closeness and intimacy

· Compulsive self-reliance

· Passive or uninvolved in relationships

· Find it hard to get along with co-workers and authority figures

· Prefers to work alone, or to be self employed

· May use work to avoid investing in relationships

2. Anxious/ Ambivalent

· Demonstrates compulsive caregiving

· Problems with establishing and maintaining appropriate boundaries

· Feels they give they give more than they get back

· Feels their efforts aren’t noticed or appreciated

· Idealizes people

· Expects their partner to repeatedly demonstrate their love, affection and commitment to them, and the relationship

· Emotionally over-invests in friendships and romantic relationships

· Are preoccupied with close relationships

· Overly dependent on their partner

· Believes that others are out to use them or to take advantage of them

· Fears rejection

· Is uncomfortable with anger

· Experiences a roller coaster of emotions – and often these are extremes of emotion

· Tends to be possessive and jealous; finds it hard to trust

· Believes they are essentially flawed, inadequate and unlovable.

Tips for littles who menstruate

Hello girls and boys and others who are cursed with the monthly monster! Have you ever been in little space and gone to the bathroom and BAM, completely ruined by this grown up thing your body is doing? Never fear Moon Princess is here to talk about the glories of : 

Keep reading

Why Littles need discipline

1. We want to feel like you are invested in us enough to take time out of your day to correct us when we are being bad.

2. Structure makes us feel safe and loved.

3. IF YOU DONT TELL US TO STOP EATING COOKIES/SWEETS we will eat it all and have tummy aches.

4. The spanks aren’t allll that bad. ☺️

5. I don’t want to feel big. And when you let us get away with everything it makes me feel like I’m in charge.

Do people realize how bad cheating messes up a caregiver?

(If in head space don’t read)

Like if your little cheats on you and you find out from another source do you understand how that feels? 

Your little literally goes and finds a “better(how I see it) caregiver so they are happy. That shows your caregiver isn’t enough. That (I) they just didn’t care for you enough. That you needed someone else to get want you needed

That someone else was putting your little in their little space. That someone else was “taking better care” of your little

That’s terrible. How do you think the caregiver feels?

I felt shattered and full of rage. Like, I believe I’m a pretty okay caregiver (Daddy) that tries really hard to always make my little happy but once a little cheated on me.. Do you know what that does to a caregiver

It breaks them. It makes (me) them want to stop. To just not be a caregiver. To not trust anyone. To not be in any more relationships

Having your little go to someone else to get to little space. To need SOMEONE else to take care of them. To need SOMEONE ELSE to be there for them. 

 To. Need. Someone. Other. Than. You. 

It crumbles the (my) heart. 

Trust is lost

The will to care for another goes down a little (if not a lot or completely)

Especially if that little was (is) your everything

Especially if you thought they were the one. Your last one

Do (us) your caregiver a favor, if you are going to cheat or whatever tell (us) them. It’s so much worse when you have to hear that your little has someone else/is cheating from an outside source. If we hear it from you it isn’t that bad (in my opinion)

Caregivers are just as important, okay. I never see anything about caregiver problems. Like “REAL” problems. We need to talk about this stuff. Or maybe I’m just not looking in the right places. I can’t be the only one dealing with stuff like this, right?

Caregiver problems:

Your friends saying your girlfriend is too needy/clingy because they message you “way too often,” and you reply instantly.

And you’re sat here thinking, “Are you kidding? I wish they’d text more. I’m replying quickly because I like talking to her. She’s my baby. Hush.”

But all you say is, “Nah. I like it.”

我需要。。。

I need somebody…


I’m really tired of being alone.

I’m really tired of being picky with people


But I just have to be.


I want somebody not so far in age, who takes the lifestyle as seriously as I do and wants something real. I want somebody cute, and fun, and annoying, and brave and smart and somebody who I can give myself to fully. No fear.


Love is so frustrating.



People keep saying something really good is coming my way but….


When?

Patient came in requesting a female caregiver. No problem, we can do that…


“And I want one who’s, you know, bubbly. I want someone with a bubbly personality.”


We cannot do that.

What is Attachment Disorder?

Attachment disorder is where a child or adult is unable to form normal healthy attachments. This is usually due to detrimental early life experiences - such as neglect, abuse, separation from their parents or primary caregivers (after six months of age and before three years of age), frequent change of caregivers, and lack of responsiveness from their caregivers.

Symptoms vary depending on age. In adults, they fall under one of two categories – either avoidant or anxious/ ambivalent personalities. These are summarized below.

1. Avoidant

· Intense anger and hostility

· Hypercritical of others

· Extremely sensitive to criticism, correction or blame

· Lacks empathy

· Sees others as untrustworthy and unreliable

· Either sees themselves as being unlovable or “too good” for others

· Relationships are experienced as either being too threatening or requiring too much effort

· Fear of closeness and intimacy

· Compulsive self-reliance

· Passive or uninvolved in relationships

· Find it hard to get along with co-workers and authority figures

· Prefers to work alone, or to be self employed

· May use work to avoid investing in relationships

2. Anxious/ Ambivalent

· Demonstrates compulsive caregiving

· Problems with establishing and maintaining appropriate boundaries

· Feels they give they give more than they get back

· Feels their efforts aren’t noticed or appreciated

· Idealizes people

· Expects their partner to repeatedly demonstrate their love, affection and commitment to them, and the relationship

· Emotionally over-invests in friendships and romantic relationships

· Are preoccupied with close relationships

· Overly dependent on their partner

· Believes that others are out to use them or to take advantage of them

· Fears rejection

· Is uncomfortable with anger

· Experiences a roller coaster of emotions – and often these are extremes of emotion

· Tends to be possessive and jealous; finds it hard to trust

· Believes they are essentially flawed, inadequate and unlovable.

anonymous asked:

hi omg I love your blog! could you guys maybe do some daichi headcanons? i need soft daichi in my life!!

Soft Daichi is my jam, Anon… He’s a perfect husband and I love him. I did some Childhood and Fatherhood headcanons; hope that’s ok!! Sora is Admn Ellie’s brainchild, though, and she helped me with the childhood ones a lot.
~Admin Emma


Childhood:

  • I’ve mentioned before that Daichi was the wee-est of wee babies, but just because he was small didn’t mean he wasn’t healthy… and he was definitely a bit of a trouble maker. He was an inquisitive little bean, exploring everything–the instant he was mobile, he was into everything. No one really minded because he wasn’t overly destructive, but his older brother certainly minded when Daichi got into his Weekly Jump collection.
  • Daichi has two brothers–one a few years older, one a few years younger. Kaiyo is his older brother–taller, stoic, muscular and went into police work; Sora is his younger brother–also taller, obscenely popular in school, kind of a pretty boy, good at sports… Daichi has always low key felt inferior to both of them, even as a kid.
  • When Daichi was about five, he fell out of bed. It sounded like a sack of bricks hitting the floor, and his parents nearly had a panic attack. Child was still sound asleep, curled up with his blankets and pillows and his stuffed Pikachu, and didn’t even stir when his mom tucked him back in. He was fine (kid’s built like a brick house even then) but his mom installed safety barriers on the bed the next day. They didn’t come off until Daichi was almost in high school (and only then because he begged her)
  • Daichi was never a kid to cry a lot. He tried really hard not to when he hurt himself or he felt disappointed with something. It got to the point that, even when he fell out of a tree when he was eight and broke his arm in three places, he only whimpered. His mom only figured it out before he went inside because Sora started screaming.
  • Daichi has always had problems with really vivid night terrors. He experienced sleep paralysis for a brief period when he was young, and to this day he still needs a small light in the bedroom with absolutely zero mirrors. Before Sora was born, he would climb in bed with his parents, but once he was a big brother, he tried to deal with it on his own.
  • He was an artistic child. He was that kid who always had piles of crayons and colored pencils; the fridge was always covered in his drawings and paintings, and he was really serious about it. He even had a little sketchbook most of his life. He continued this habit well into his adulthood–he’s always needed that creative outlet. It’s how he’s so steady, even at a young age.
  • Daichi wanted to be a firefighter when he grew up. He was always really interested in helping people, and he always really admired them. Even after he started to play volleyball really seriously, he was looking at it for like, a real job and everything. As he got older, he started reconsidering because his parents really wanted him to go to college, but it’s still a low key dream that he has.
  • Daichi had a stuffed Pikachu growing up; he was always a big gamer as a kid, and Pokemon was his favorite. It was his fifth birthday present, and he literally carried it everywhere for about two years. It was always the one toy he took on school trips, it stayed in bed with him always, and when it had to be washed, he either had to be at school or he parked in front of the dryer until it came out.

Fatherhood:

  • When Daichi finds out you’re pregnant, he’s elated. He sweeps you into this gentle hug and there are tears in the corners of his eyes. He can’t believe how happy he is, and how lucky he is. He is super protective, though, almost to a fault. He will literally do everything for you without being asked. It’s great in the early months when you’re sick and tired, but by the end, you’re probably ready for some of your independence back.
  • Everyone sort of expects him to step into his role as a husband, caregiver, and father no problem, but he has a lot of anxieties and doubts. Researching gives him panic attacks, but not researching keeps him awake at night. He’s caught somewhere between wanting to be supportive and wanting to be supported. He feels guilty about it, though, because he’s always been your stern and stable Daichi, and you’re the one growing a baby, not him. Reassure him, though. Once you remind him that you’re nervous too, and that you’re a team, he’ll feel better.
  • The day his children are born are literally the happiest days of his lives. He worries the whole time you’re in labor, but the first time he holds his baby in his arms, he’s gone. He’s in love, and he’s so fucking proud. No victory, no goal reached, no obstacle overcome compares to the feeling of his healthy, tiny baby in his arms. He cries–like, real honest-to-God gut-wrenching sobs–when his first grabs a hold of his finger with those tiny, tiny hands. He thanks you profusely, and refuses to leave your side for a while.
  • He is literally your rock in the early months. He pulls more than his weight around the house because he knows you’re up every hour on the hour for feedings. He tries to get up too, especially for the things he can do like changing the baby or rocking it back to sleep when it just needs to be soothed. As a result, you and him both bond pretty thoroughly with your children, and neither of you is too exhausted because the other is always picking up slack and taking turns.
  • He loves blowing raspberries on their cheeks and tummies because he lives for their laughter. He does it to them until they’re about four or five, and when that doesn’t work, he tickles. He just wants his kids to be happy and feel loved at whatever cost, and if a few tickles from Dad is what it takes, he’s more than willing to deliver.
  • Daichi encourages wide varieties and arrays of interests. He wants his kids to try intellectual, artistic and creative, and athletic pursuits to their abilities and desires. He encourages trying new things, even if they aren’t very good at it at first, because he wasn’t born an amazing volleyball player. He’s also that Dad who will absolutely look into stuff his kids are into, but he’s not into or doesn’t know anything about. If his kids obsess over a game, he’ll try and understand what’s happening and ask them questions if they’re ok with it. If they get into playing a musical instrument, he’ll always ask them to put on little concerts for him, even if they’re awful at it. He always encourages and praises them, though.
  • He is literally the most supportive dad. If his kids ever came out to him, he would be so loving and supportive, no matter what. He also goes out of his way to make his house a safe space for all of his kid’s friends, unless they are legitimately bad people. Daichi has always been a good judge of character, though, and his kids trust his good word.
  • He literally takes to fatherhood like a fish to water. Everyone jokes about how it’s because of all the practice he had in high school, but he also knows that he would literally do anything for his kids. He’s just the best dad–stern, but fair; supportive, but always pushing for them to do better. He cries at every milestone, and makes them smile when they’re down. He’s just literally the best father any kid could ask for.

anonymous asked:

"Patient came in requesting a female caregiver. No problem, we can do that" Why isn't that considered illegal gender discrimination? Just wondering not accusing you.

The patient isn’t an employer, so they’re not subject to employment laws.

Ethically I feel sort of weird about it–when someone says “I’d prefer to discuss my sexual issues with another man” or “I just feel safer with a woman,” it runs up uncomfortably against a lot of my personal beliefs about gender.  But on a practical level, this isn’t about my personal beliefs, and it’s not the right setting to have a Socratic dialogue about “what is gender, anyway?”  So I just try to accommodate those requests as much as possible.

SAFE PLACE BLOG

This is a safe place blog for everyone, regardless of their gender, sexuality or age

-If you’re a little who wants friends, I’m here for you
-If you’re a mommy/daddy/caregiver who has problems with their little and wants to ask things, I’ll be more than happy to help
-If you’re simply interested in the dd/lg community and you want to learn more, don’t hesitate to ask me
-If you’re a little who seeks for guidance, don’t worry, I’ll help you
-If you’re an underage little and you’re scared of being discriminated, fear not, you’re safe here

A blog of a little for littles

"Survival tip to self #1: Carry my gun close to my heart."

Another thing for art college app, have Ice in an apocalypse AU in which Ice’s caregivers Den and Nor were murdered by bandits and he becomes an embittered wasteland vigilante. Also just realized it’s actually Ice’s birthday so… happy birthday! C:>

Attachment Disorder

Attachment disorder is where a child or adult is unable to form normal healthy attachments. This is usually due to detrimental early life experiences - such as neglect, abuse, separation from their parents or primary caregivers (after six months of age and before three years of age), frequent change of caregivers, and lack of responsiveness from their caregivers.

Symptoms vary depending on age. In adults, they fall under one of two categories – either avoidant or anxious/ ambivalent personalities. These are summarized below.

1. Avoidant

· Intense anger and hostility

· Hypercritical of others

· Extremely sensitive to criticism, correction or blame

· Lacks empathy

· Sees others as untrustworthy and unreliable

· Either sees themselves as being unlovable or “too good” for others

· Relationships are experienced as either being too threatening or requiring too much effort

· Fear of closeness and intimacy

· Compulsive self-reliance

· Passive or uninvolved in relationships

· Find it hard to get along with co-workers and authority figures

· Prefers to work alone, or to be self employed

· May use work to avoid investing in relationships

2. Anxious/ Ambivalent

· Demonstrates compulsive caregiving

· Problems with establishing and maintaining appropriate boundaries

· Feels they give they give more than they get back

· Feels their efforts aren’t noticed or appreciated

· Idealizes people

· Expects their partner to repeatedly demonstrate their love, affection and commitment to them, and the relationship

· Emotionally over-invests in friendships and romantic relationships

· Are preoccupied with close relationships

· Overly dependent on their partner

· Believes that others are out to use them or to take advantage of them

· Fears rejection

· Is uncomfortable with anger

· Experiences a roller coaster of emotions – and often these are extremes of emotion

· Tends to be possessive and jealous; finds it hard to trust

· Believes they are essentially flawed, inadequate and unlovable.