captivating portraits

The Captive Prince fandom is on a roll! We present to you the newest project…

With Flying Colors - a CaPri charity coloring book!

After hearing about the tragic events that happened recently in Puerto Rico (Hurricane Maria claimed 17 lives and completely wrecked the country) and Mexico (so far, almost 350 deaths have been recorded after the earthquakes), we wished to help as best we could. And since the CaPri fandom is so generous and so eager to create new content, we thought it would be nice to run a little ezine to raise funds for charity!

The project will kick off on October 15, and this is how things will work out:

  • Oct. 15 - Nov. 15: Submission period

***There will be no application process! If you want to join the zine, you will have to submit a finished piece to our email (will be made public on 10/15) anytime during this timeframe. The submissions will be evaluated and selected by the mods, but we aim to accept as many artworks as possible.

  • Nov. 15 - 25: Selection of artworks + Assembling of book
  • Nov. 25 - Dec. 24: PDF available for purchasing
  • Dec. 25: Donations made

To participate to this ezine, you must submit (at least) 1 Captive Prince artwork:

  • Single page, portrait: 14.8 x 21.0 cm (5.83 x 8.27 in) OR Spread, landscape: 29.6 x 21.0 cm (11.69 x 8.27 in);
  • New artwork only! We would like to see content fresh out of the oven and that hasn’t been posted online yet;
  • Digital and traditional art (preferably scanned) welcome!;
  • Finished, black and white only, clean and detailed lineart;
  • Files at 300dpi + .PNG;
  • No theme! Feel free to draw whatever you want as long as it’s about CaPri.

This will be an ezine only! 100% of the profits from the PDF sales will be split evenly between Direct Relief and TOPOS.

We hope you’ll want to join our cause by participating and/or by buying the book! And even if you can’t do either, spreading the word about this will help us a lot 💜 And if you have any questions, don’t hesitate to ask!

Thank you, everyone! See you on the 15th~

flickr

Black Jaguar by Steve Mackay
Via Flickr:
A portrait of a captive Melanistic Jaguar.

Your eyes say, “For Now,”’ Laurent said. ‘Your eyes have always said, “For now.” | captive prince realism project

Some Time Later
  • As the years go one, Damen’s hair gets longer and Laurent loves it
  • Laurent does not, however, love the beard Damen is growing as he finds it scratchy and hides his husband’s beautiful face
    • Damen quite frankly doesn’t care as his father and Kastor had beards and wants to keep up tradition
    • Laurent respects his wishes even if it means saying goodbye to the dimple
  • Laurent loves tracing his fingers along the growing gray/white hairs that are slowly taking over his husband’s mane
  • Damen loves leaving kisses on Laurent’s wrinkles as they become more apparent
  • Laurent’s hair becomes thinner and whiter
  • It takes a long time before they are convinced they can’t travel as often as they used to, even even longer for Damen to realize he can’t spar like he used to
  • They still go riding, though its not far, and its usually during private outings together and/or with their child
  • The child is becoming a wonderful heir by the way, dads are so proud
  • Each night, they gaze at each other and are so thankful for the years they spent together
    • Laurent cries into his husband’s arms one night and Damen pretends not to notice
    • Laurent returns the favor
  • Nik coordinated Damen’s funeral and Jord coordinated Laurent’s
    • The remaining king also had a huge part of course, but lets leave dates of death ambiguous
  • There is a statue of the both of them joined at Kingsmeet
  • Paintings of them hang in Ios, Arles, and Marlas
  • They looks happier than any regal portrait should

Irish Girl (Mary Lavelle) (1913). Robert Henri (American, 1865-1929). Oil on panel.

The work was painted on Achill Island, during Henri’s visit to Ireland. The bright eyes, full mouth and dark hair Henri so admired inspire a portrait of striking color and expressive brushwork. The work captures Henri’s fascination with Irish children and is a captivating example of the portraits for which the artist is known.