capitol protest

Protesters fill Texas Capitol to fight SB4, the state’s new anti-sanctuary cities law

  • On Monday, the Texas House was briefly overtaken by hundreds of people protesting the state’s new anti-sanctuary cities law, known as SB4, the Associated Press reported.
  • The new law, which was signed by Texas Gov. Greg Abbott on May 7, will require both local police chiefs and sheriffs to comply with federal requests to hold criminal suspects for possible deportation. If they do not comply, they could lose their jobs or end up in jail themselves.
  • To oppose the bill, hundreds of demonstrators showed up in red shirts with the words “fight back” emblazoned on the front.
  • The noise prompted House leadership to stop its session, the last one before its recess. Read More (5/29/17 5:50 PM)
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Happy Earth Day! 

But, really everyday is earth day. If we are going to save Mother Earth, we all have to make a conscious effort in our own lives everyday. Recycle, ride your bike more, eat less meat, pick up that piece of trash that isnt yours, be an advocate for environmental policy, and believe in science.

The real heart of the legislation is the guilt by association — and giving the government the right to criminally prosecute and seize the assets of everyone who planned a protest and everyone who participated. And what’s worse is that the person who may have broken a window, triggering the claim there was a riot, might actually not be a member of the group but someone from the other side.

There’s something else: By including rioting in racketeering laws, it actually permits police to arrest those who are planning events.   

nytimes.com
BREAKING: Short One Vote to Defeat Betsy DeVos, Democrats Refuse to Yield Floor In Midst of 24-Hour Filibuster, Republicans Respond By Keeping Senate In Session, Day & Night, To Confirm Four Cabinet Nominees
Republicans responded by vowing to keep the Senate in session, day and night, until lawmakers confirm Ms. DeVos and three other cabinet nominees.
By Emmarie Huetteman

WASHINGTON — Tensions over President Trump’s nominations turned into a parliamentary game of chicken on Monday, with Republican leaders vowing to keep the Senate in session, day and night, until lawmakers confirm four of his cabinet picks.

After days of grasping at procedural hurdles, Democrats held vigil against Betsy DeVos, Mr. Trump’s polarizing nominee for education secretary, and promised to spend the final 24 hours before her confirmation vote Tuesday reiterating their objections.

But as Democrats made clear they had no intention of yielding even a minute of their allotted floor time to debate Mr. Trump’s nominations — a final act of parliamentary disobedience for a minority party that lacks the votes to block a nominee on its own — Republicans stood their ground.

Daring Democrats to keep their word at the expense of several sleepless nights, Senator John Cornyn of Texas, the chamber’s No. 2 Republican, said the Senate session would not end until lawmakers confirmed four of Mr. Trump’s nominees: Ms. DeVos, Senator Jeff Sessions of Alabama as attorney general, Representative Tom Price of Georgia to lead the Department of Health and Human Services, and Steven T. Mnuchin as Treasury secretary.

The effort could last into Saturday and might involve burning “a little midnight oil,” Mr. Cornyn said.

Short one critical but elusive Republican “no” vote against Ms. DeVos — a billionaire philanthropist with little experience in public schools and a remarkably shaky showing at her confirmation hearing — Democrats on Monday did the only thing they could: They talked.

Senator Patty Murray of Washington announced that Democrats would occupy the floor until the vote on Ms. DeVos’s nomination, which is expected around midday on Tuesday. Ms. Murray is the top Democrat on the committee that approved Ms. DeVos along a party-line vote, and one of her most strident opponents.

Publicly, Democrats held out hope that they could woo one more Republican dissenter to join Senators Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska in voting against Ms. DeVos. Both announced last week that they would not support Ms. DeVos’s nomination.

Their defections, combined with a unified vote from the Democratic caucus, set up a 50-50 tie on the nomination, which Vice President Mike Pence would have to break in his capacity as president of the Senate.

Appearing later at a demonstration outside the Capitol, Ms. Murray urged protesters to pressure Republicans to oppose Ms. DeVos. “If we can persuade one more Republican to do the right thing, we can double down on the message we’re all sending to President Trump: The Senate stands with public education!” Ms. Murray said.

A deluge of constituent calls and messages against Mr. Trump’s nominees and executive orders has overwhelmed some Senate offices and even the Capitol phone system in recent days, echoing demonstrations across the country. Energized by the opposition, Democrats seemed ready on Monday to resort to sleeping bags if necessary.

Senator Chris Van Hollen, Democrat of Maryland, said Ms. DeVos had embraced a philosophy that abandoned poorer families. She has been vehemently criticized by many education advocates for favoring voucher programs over repairing public schools.

“What do we say to them?” Mr. Van Hollen asked.

‘Die-in’ protesters dragged away from McConnell’s office

Dramatizing fears that Senate Republican’s Better Care Reconciliation Act’s cuts to Medicaid would prevent millions of low income Americans from accessing life-saving care, activism group ADAPT dramatized what those deaths could look like — in front of Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office doors.

Capitol police were then forced to drag away dozens of protestors who were lying on the floor feigning death.

See FULL STORY by Taylor Rogers/Yahoo News

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A protester is removed by police

Stephanie Woodward, of Rochester, NY, who has spina bifida and uses a wheelchair, is removed from a sit-in at Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office as she and other disability rights advocates protest proposed funding caps to Medicaid, Thursday, June 22, 2017, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Photo: Jacquelyn Martin/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A man is removed from a sit-in

A man is removed from a sit-in outside of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office as they protest proposed cuts to Medicaid, Thursday, June 22, 2017 on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Photo: Jacquelyn Martin/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Police lead away a protester

A protester is escorted by police after being arrested during a demonstration outside Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s constituent office after Senate Republicans unveiled their healthcare bill on Capitol Hill in Washington, June 22, 2017. (Photo: Kevin Lamarque/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Police remove a protester

People are removed from a sit-in outside of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office as they protest proposed cuts to Medicaid, Thursday, June 22, 2017 on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Photo: Jacquelyn Martin/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A protestor is removed from a sit-in

A protestor is removed from a sit-in outside of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office where they protested proposed cuts to Medicaid, Thursday, June 22, 2017 on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Photo: Jacquelyn Martin/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Police prepare to remove a protester

Capitol Police prepare to remove a man from a sit-in of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office, as he and others protest proposed caps to Medicaid Thursday, June 22, 2017, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Photo: Jacquelyn Martin/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Police escort a protester away

A protester is escorted by police away from a demonstration outside Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s constituent office after Senate Republicans unveiled their healthcare bill in Washington, June 22, 2017. (Photo: Kevin Lamarque/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

The soles of a man’s sneakered feet are seen as he is removed by Capitol Police from a sit-in of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office, as he and others protest proposed caps to Medicaid Thursday, June 22, 2017, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Photo: Jacquelyn Martin/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A protester is led away

A demonstrator in a wheelchair protesting cuts to Medicaid is led from the office of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell by a U.S. Capitol police officer at the Russell Senate Office building in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, June 22, 2017. (Photo: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A protestor shouts

A protestor against the Senate Republican’s draft healthcare bill shouts outside the office of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Republican of Kentucky, on Capitol Hill in Washington, June 22, 2017. (Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A protester is escorted away

U.S. Capitol Police remove a protester from in front of the office of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) inside the Russell Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill, on June 22, 2017 in Washington. (Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A protester is wheeled away

A demonstrator in a wheelchair protesting cuts to Medicaid is led from the office of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell by a U.S. Capitol police officer at the Russell Senate Office building in Washington on Thursday, June 22, 2017. (Photo: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

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What would a day be like without Latinos?

Madison will be pondering that today as thousands of Latinos will be leaving school, work, and businesses to come to the state Capitol building to protest two pieces of anti-immigration legislation that the Wisconsin State Legislature is trying to push through. Several area businesses will be closed today for “Día Sin Latinos (Day Without Latinos)” to demonstrate what the community would be like without Latinos and immigrants.

These past couple of weeks, Wisconsinites — mostly the Latino/immigrant community — have been fighting proposed legislative laws AB 450 and SB 533.

AB 450 is an anti-immigration bill that would allow police and other officials to stop people and ask them for their legal status. If they failed to provide the required or correct documents, one will be charged as a criminal and a possible deportation could take place. This law will be very similar to those passed in Arizona. It has been passed through the assembly committee of Wisconsin.

MI GENTE NEVER STAYS QUIET! 🇦🇷🇧🇴🇧🇷🇨🇱🇨🇴🇨🇷🇨🇺🇩🇴🇪🇨🇸🇻🇬🇹🇭🇳🇲🇽🇳🇮🇵🇦🇵🇾🇵🇪🇵🇷🇺🇾🇻🇪❤✊🏾✊🏽

#DIASINLATINOS #INDIGENOS #WISCONSINISNOTARIZONA

USA. California. Sacramento. May 2, 1967. Black Panthers amass at the Capitol brandishing guns to protest a bill before an Assembly committee restricting the carrying of arms in public. Self-defence was a key part of the Panthers’ agenda. This was an early action, a year after their founding.

Photograph: Walt Zeboski/AP

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Today, from White House to Capitol, DC

Continue to let your voices be heard

🗽“Keep ancient lands, your storied pomp!” cries she
With silent lips.
“Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!” 🗽🔥💥

(All taken by me)

businessinsider.com
11 images show police forcibly removing disabled people during 'die-in' protest over Senate health care bill [TW: Abuse of Disabled Persons]
Disabled protesters organized a "die-in" in response to the Senate health care bill.
By Madeleine Sheehan Perkins

Several dozen disabled people were forcibly removed and arrested by police during a protest over the a Senate health care bill outside of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office on Thursday.

McConnell unveiled the bill the same day. The Republican-led effort was largely seen as negatively impacting some of the most vulnerable Americans.

The protesters shouted chants like “don’t touch Medicaid, save our liberty.” The demonstration was organized by ADAPT, a national disability rights organization, CNNreported.

“The American Health Care Act caps and significantly cuts Medicaid which will greatly reduce access to medical care and home and community based services for elderly and disabled Americans who will either die or be forced into institutions,” ADAPT organizer Bruce Darling, who took part in the protest, said in a statement.

Capitol Police took 43 protesters into custody after some of them removed themselves from their wheelchairs as part of the “die-in” demonstration, according to a statement cited by several news outlets.

Here’s how it unfolded:

As part of the “die-in,” some protesters like this man removed themselves from their wheelchairs.

After being accused of blocking the hallway outside Sen. Mitch McConnell’s office, protesters were removed by police.

Some were escorted out in their wheelchairs.

Others were forcibly carried out.

A visually impaired man using a white cane was led away.

Stephanie Woodward, of Rochester, New York, who has spina bifida and uses a wheelchair, is removed by police.

A protester is escorted out in a wheelchair.

This woman, whose condition was not immediately known, was carried out.

The bottoms of this man’s feet are seen as police carry him away.

A woman is led away by Capitol Police in her wheelchair.

Wearing an ADAPT shirt, this woman raises her arms triumphantly as she’s wheeled away.

Yesterday, we rose. Today we must continue to rise. We must stand up and take action and lend our voices to the collective roar. Join the @aclu_nationwide donate money to @plannedparenthood call your local representatives and tell them how desperately we need their help to make positive change. Stand up. Act. What a beautiful outpouring of solidarity and peace across this planet yesterday. What an honor to watch it, to be a part, however small. #womensmarch #womensmarchmontana

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Protesters disrupt Sen. Jeff Sessions’ confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill

Protesters disrupted Sen. Jeff Sessions’ confirmation hearing for attorney general on Tuesday, including two men wearing Ku Klux Klan costumes and a woman wearing a pink crown.

The conservative Alabama senator, who is Donald Trump’s pick for the nation’s top law enforcement official, faces concerns over how committed he would be to civil rights.

The disruptions occurred during the morning session of his hearing. As Capitol Police took the men wearing white hoods and sheets out of the Senate hearing room, they yelled, “you can’t arrest me, I am white!” and “white people own this government!” They held up hand signs saying, “Go Jeffie Boy!” and “KKK.”

Also removed was at least one protester from the liberal group Code Pink, who held a sign that said, “Support civil rights, stop Sessions.” Wearing a pink crown modeled on the Statue of Liberty, she shouted, “his voting record is evil.”

Civil liberties advocates have expressed concerns about Sessions’ voting record and his appearances before groups that espouse harsh views on Muslims and immigrants. The Alabama Republican was rejected for a federal judgeship by the Senate Judiciary Committee 30 years ago amid accusations of racial insensitivity.

Seeking to address those concerns, Sessions said in a prepared opening statement that he “understands the history of civil rights and the horrendous impact that relentless and systemic discrimination and the denial of voting rights has had on our African-American brothers and sisters.” (AP)

(Photos: Kevin Lamarque/Reuters, Alex Brandon/AP, Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images [2])

See more from the protests on Yahoo News.