capital-of-holland

De Boschplaat Named First IDA International Dark Sky Park In Netherlands
The countries of Western Europe are among the most light polluted in the world. The Netherlands leads these countries with a relatively small size, a large population density and the tendency to light outdoor spaces to high levels. Yet, in some Dutch cities there remain a few places that are dark nighttime refuges for people and wildlife. One of these protected places, on an island in the North Sea, permits no electric lighting anywhere and serves as an important stopover for European migratory bird species on their way to and from wintering grounds in West Africa. IDA now recognizes this preserve, De Boschplaat, as an International Dark Sky Park.

De Boschplaat, a 40 square kilometer area the eastern side of the island of Terschelling, is a “Natura 2000” Nature Reserve recognized by the European Council. It is locally managed by the conservation agency Staatsbosbeheer. Except when areas in the preserve are closed for conservation purposes, the public has unrestricted access to the entire property at all times, and eight locations within the park have been specially designated for nighttime visitors to view the stars. 

“De Boschplaat is a wonderful place, a symbol of the other side of our busy, human driven landscape where no square inch is not turned over many times,” said Wim Schmidt, leader of the effort to secure IDA recognition for the new Dark Sky Park. "This is the reason many Dutch and foreign tourists go there. Terschelling is one of the most visited tourist places in the Netherlands, because of De Boschplaat.” 

The City of Leeuwarden, on the Dutch mainland, will serve as the European Capital of Culture in 2018. Its status represents a great opportunity to bring new visitors to the island and expose them to importance of protecting dark skies across Europe.

yahoo.com
Man decapitated in suspected French Islamist attack

Saint-Quentin-Fallavier (France) (AFP) - At least one suspected Islamist launched a daylight raid on a gas factory in eastern France Friday, pinning a decapitated head to the gates and injuring at least two others with explosive devices.

“The intent was without doubt to cause an explosion. It was a terrorist attack,” said President Francois Hollande in Brussels, cutting short an EU summit to hold emergency meetings in the French capital.

Hollande said a vehicle driven at high speed by “one person, maybe accompanied by another” smashed into the factory, around 40 kilometres (25 miles) from France’s second city Lyon.

“At the time I am speaking, there is one dead and two injured,” said a grim-faced Hollande, calling for “solidarity” for the victim, who was found with Arabic inscriptions on him.

The 35-year-old attacker, identified as Yacine Salhi, had been known to security services for a number of years but did not have a criminal record, Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve said.

ripostelaique.com
Les Français vont-ils se laisser décapiter, à cause de Hollande-Valls-Cazeneuve ? - Riposte Laïque
Comme Riposte Laique et d’autres l’annonçaient depuis longtemps, la question n’était pas de savoir s’il y aurait de nouveaux attentats, et des décapitations en France, mais quand. La réponse est tombée, ce vendredi. Un homme de 50 ans, chef d’entreprise, a été décapité par un de ses anciens salariés, musulman, qui a accroché sa tête …
One decapitated in 'terrorist' attack on France gas factory

A suspected Islamist launched a daylight raid on an industrial gas factory in France Friday, pinning a severed head to the gates in what President Francois Hollande called a “terrorist” attack.

The grisly attack near France’s second city of Lyon came on an especially bloody day worldwide, with at least 27 gunned down at a beach resort in Tunisia and 25 killed in a suicide bombing in Kuwait claimed by Islamic State extremists.

“The intent was without doubt to cause an explosion. It was a terrorist attack,” said Francois Hollande in Brussels, cutting short an EU summit to chair emergency meetings in the French capital.

Hollande said a vehicle driven at high speed by “one person, maybe accompanied by another” smashed into the factory, about 40 kilometres (25 miles) from Lyon.

“At the time I am speaking, there is one dead and two injured,” said a grim-faced Hollande, calling for “solidarity” for the victim, who was found with Arabic inscriptions on him.

It is thought to be the first instance in France of a beheading during an attack – which has become a trademark of the Islamic State group in Iraq and Syria.

And the gruesome killing came nearly six months after the Islamist attacks in and around Paris that left 17 people dead and started with a shooting at satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo.

- ‘Lone wolf’ attacks -

The 35-year-old attacker, identified as Yassin Salhi, had been known to security services for a number of years but did not have a criminal record, Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve said.

The minister said a local firefighter who rushed to the scene of the attack had overpowered the suspect, praising him for his “courage and … cool head”.

Salhi and his wife have been taken into custody and an anti-terrorist probe has been launched, Cazeneuve said.

At least one other person is also being questioned as part of the investigation but there is no formal link with the attack, said sources close to the probe.

The victim, who ran a delivery company, was Salhi’s boss.

A woman identified as Salhi’s wife told French radio: “On the news they are saying that it’s a terrorist attack, but that’s impossible. I know him, he’s my husband. We have a normal family life.”

For months, Europe has been on high-alert for so-called “lone wolf” attacks that are very difficult to prevent after Islamic State fighters urged supporters to carry out assaults wherever they could.

At the scene of Friday’s attack, Islamist flags were found and are being analysed, said Cazeneuve.

“There was a decapitated body with inscriptions,” said Hollande, although sources close to the enquiry said it was not clear whether the victim was transported to the site or whether the beheading was carried out at the factory.

The suspect smashed into the factory owned by American group Air Products, hurting at least two people, Hollande said.

Authorities said it was unclear whether the attacker was acting alone, or had accomplices – “that’s now the question,” he added.

- 'Islamist terrorism’ -

Security services drew up a file on the suspect in 2006 for radicalisation, said Cazeneuve, who went immediately to the scene.

He had a “link” to the Salafist movement, an extreme form of Sunni Islam, Cazeneuve added, stressing that the investigation was in its early stages.

The attack, which occurred around 10:00 am local time (0800 GMT) in the town of Saint-Quentin-Fallavier, shocked local residents.

“This is a small town and a large industrial zone. There’s never been any concern in the region. We’re all surprised,” an employee at a nearby business told rolling news channel BMFTV.

Prime Minister Manuel Valls, who is on an official trip in South America, ordered security measures to be stepped up at all sensitive sites in the area.

“Islamist terrorism has hit France again,” Valls told reporters in Bogota.

France has been on high alert since January 7 when two Islamist brothers attacked Charlie Hebdo, killing 12. A policewoman and four hostages in a Jewish supermarket were also killed during the three-day attacks.

The January attacks drew nearly four million people, including dozens of world leaders, onto the streets of France in an historic “march against terrorism”.

World leaders reacted swiftly to the news with Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy saying that “barbarism will always be confronted by unity among democrats.”

German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier said his country stands united with France against “terror’s blind hate” and in defence of “free society”.

France has a high proportion of people that have gone to fight alongside Islamists in Iraq and Syria and the biggest Muslim population in Europe.

Earlier this week, the country passed a controversial new spying law granting sweeping powers to snoop on citizens.

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Air Products

Provinces

This time I would like to talk about how The Netherlands is divided in smaller parts. 

We have 12 provinces you could compare the with states but they are a lot smaller, they each have their own name and a small "capital"

1 Noord Holland (North Holland)

2 Overijssel

3.Groningen

4.Limburg (I live here)

5.Zeeland (Sealand)

6.Zuid Holland (South Holland)

7.Drente

8.Noord Brabant

9. Flevoland

10. Gelderland

11. Friesland

12.Utrecht

If you decide to go to the Netherlands, you most likely will go to North or South Holland because those provinces have to most tourist attractions like Amsterdam, the parlement and the windmills.

I hope you liked this post, and as we say in The Netherlands, tot ziens.