cannibal island

Can you believe that both poor people and petty criminals had the unbelievable gall to exist in 1930s Russia? If people were to see all those undesirables, why, they might think that communism wasn’t actually a perfect utopia. Something had to be done, and seeing as Soylent Green hadn’t yet been invented, Stalin decided on the next best thing: Cannibal Island.

In 1933, 6,114 people classified as “outdated elements,” which is both a strangely innocuous name for people so unwelcome they were sentenced to death, as well as a pretty sweet title for our ‘80s techno band. The outdated elements were sent to Nazino Island in Siberia. 27 of them died on the journey.

Anyone who tried to escape was hunted for sport by the soldiers. There were no shelters or animals on the island, little vegetation, and absolutely no food. It didn’t take long for the prisoners to start eating the dead, and then helping the living become the dead a bit faster so they could eat them too. Here’s a detailed account of a girl stranded on the island who suffered this very fate, but you shouldn’t read it without first looking at pictures of kittens for an hour.

5 Shady Things The USSR Did That You Can’t Even Exaggerate

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Disney characters at ACEN part 1 Some of these are from the meetup and some are just hallway shots As always, if you see yourself or a friend, tag away! I’m the Jack Sparrow in the last pic with Baymax and Tadashi. Cannibal Island Jack Sparrow is

troy-and-abed-in-a-bubble

Maleficent is grimbeecosplay

Stone figures called moai stand beneath a double rainbow at Ahu Akivi. The stat ues face a plaza fronted with stones, the site of early religious rites and dan ces, and sometimes cannibal feasts, Easter Island, James P. Blair.

195 years ago today, on November 20th, 1820, the Nantucket whaling ship Essex sunk in the middle of the Pacific Ocean after being repeatedly attacked by an enormous sperm whale.

The crew was able to escape on small whaleboats with supplies from the sinking ship, but were stranded at sea 2000 miles from South America. Fearing rumors of cannibals living on nearby islands, the whalers attempted to voyage to Chile, which took three months. Along the way several men died of starvation, and others requested to be left on a deserted island for hope of faster rescue. By the time they were rescued, only eight crew members were left alive, several having ironically survived by eating the bodies of their fallen companions.

Essex’s first mate, Owen Chase, soon published a book detailing the ordeal, and years later his son lent a copy to a young Herman Melville, who was inspired to write a story, Moby Dick, of the all-encompassing revenge a survivor might have felt. In fact, Essex captain George Pollard’s next ship of command also sunk, and, considering himself to be a Jonah, he retired to his hometown of Nantucket where he lived as a night watchman. Both he and Chase were known to hoard food for the rest of their lives.