campaign-fundraising

The response to my update post was pretty overwhelming. It’s hard to describe how it feels to have that much love flung at you all at once. I’m still going through all the messages and comments. It can take me a while to find the concentration to read through them all. And I wish I could respond to each and every one, but I’m afraid I might not have the energy to answer all of you. My apologies. 

Some have suggested I start a fundraising campaign to help me get to the Mayo Clinic. I will look into that, but I don’t know if that is a possibility. Even if I raise a few thousand dollars, that would probably only cover the tissues they give you in the hospital room. But maybe they have some sort of assistance program I can look into. I’ve decided that I will call them and see if I can get an idea of how much it would cost. I am not getting my hopes up. I saw the bill for my kidney stone operation and it was astronomical. It only took half a day and it was ludicrous. I’m thankful I had insurance to cover most of it. But if I went to the Mayo Clinic they may need me for many days or even weeks. And my insurance company has told me in the past that they don’t cover out-of-state treatment. 

I guess I’m just not optimistic about my chances of coming close to the money I need to go. Plus, the treatment may not even help and then you all would have sent me there for nothing. I would feel guilty if that happened. I don’t know. 

All that aside, I want to thank you all from the bottom of my heart for all of your support. I was having a lonely, shitty day yesterday and when I woke up to thousands of folks wishing me well… it made things not seem so bad for a while. You’re the best. I hope you have a lovely rest of your Sunday. 

Take care!

the-pasta-pack  asked:

Hey, I've respected the work of Pack West Wolfdog Rescue for a while and am honestly a bit surprised to see that you're not going to be working with them directly anymore. Can you expand on the issues with the organization itself, which you referenced previously, that led you to this decision? Thanks!

I’m very hesitant to answer this question, but yeah, I can. I’ve been torn for a while about addressing this on the blog - I don’t want to undermine a growing organization, but I do think there are some things that, in the context of an organization I hadn’t personally worked with, I would feel that people should know. Since there are a couple of things that are serious enough that I’m no longer comfortable being involved with them until they’ve been addressed, I think they need to be talked about.

These issues were either not present or not readily apparent when I started working with them, but have occurred or become noticeable in the interim. It was not until recently that I put together the individual issues I was uncomfortable with into the larger picture that led me to choose to distance myself from them. I believe I’ve voiced my observations regarding all of these issues to Pack West either in person or by chat, so these are not unknown issues. 

My concerns are based on personal observation of how the facility functions during the two week-long periods I have spent at their facility and my personal online communications with them during the period between visits. My feelings on why these issues are problems stem from over a decade as a dog trainer, a degree in behavioral science, and six years of intense study of, and participation in, exotic animal management and welfare.The below is true to my knowledge as of January, 2017 - I would love to hear that things have since changed, and would happily reassess my opinion based on that. 

Pack West does not, to the best of my knowledge, have any liability waivers or training protocols for volunteers to complete before having access to the animals. This is very unusual for an exotic animal rescue allowing volunteers - a quick google makes it clear that most places require volunteers to sign liability forms and go through training processes to prove they understand the behavior of the animals and can interact with them appropriately. If Pack West is allowing people to have contact with animals who are potentially dangerous - and whose rabies vaccinations don’t protect them under federal law -  I’d want to see them really think through what a volunteer program would entail and how they’d protect both the volunteers and their animals. I’d also want to see how those considerations would alter their practice of having their ambassador animals interact with the public without a signed waiver or muzzles on the animals. Accidents happen, and I worry their current practice would end in tragedy someday in the future.

Pack West does not, to the best of my knowledge, have either a professional behaviorist or anyone with professional animal training and management experience on staff or on retainer. As far as I am aware of, there is not anyone with a professional background in canid or domestic dog behavior involved with the intake of new rescues or with assessing the dynamics between cohoused animals. This also means that, when I was there, there was no established training protocol for managing the wolfdogs living on site, nor were there proactive management plans created to prepare for potential emergency handling needs. I believe this played a significant role in resource guarding and cabin fever escalating to the point of a fight between Cabal and Ivar while I was on site in January - as far as I know, they are no longer housed together as a result of the fight. 

I am aware that for a new rescue professional oversight may be expensive and hard to access. I believe that, nevertheless, it should still be one of their highest priorities as it immediately impacts the welfare of their animals and the safety of their staff. To be truly comfortable engaging with them again, I would want to see the members of the facility gain personal academic or professional experience in animal behavior, management, and training if they can’t afford to hire an extant professional to consult regularly. From my first-hand experiences, this currently doesn’t seem to be a priority for them - I got the impression that hands-on experience with the specific animals was considered equally as relevant as any potential academic and professional background. I feel that rescues, as professional organizations, are obligated to go above and beyond that mythology.

Pack West does not, to the best of my knowledge, have any on-site housing for their rescue animals other than a single 750 square-foot (110 foot perimeter) outdoor enclosure. I did not observe the containment to be locked at any time during either of my visits, even when nobody was on the property, nor does it have secondary containment (which is vital when housing animals known for being escape artists) other than the surrounding yard, which has a low gate and a fence that was visibly compromised in multiple spots as of my last trip. To the best of my knowledge, this enclosure is the permanent home to two large adult male wolfdogs, and for the duration of my January visit additionally housed the resident GSD or another rescue wolfdog. As of that visit, the containment furniture was comprised of two dog houses, a tire, an above-ground pond, and an overhang - there was no indoor area for the animals to use to escape the weather, no waterproof substrate or manmade flooring that would give them an escape from moisture, and no alternate space in which the animals could get a break from each other if needed. The animals were allowed time in the larger yard on site when observed, but during my trip they still spent all of their nights and many daytime hours in the single containment. By contrast, the standards set by the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries (an organization considered on par with AZA for regulating rescue and sanctuary environments) for an appropriate enclosure type for multiple large canids require “a minimum of 5,000 sq. ft. (465 sq. m) for large canids housed as pairs or trios (…) and a minimum of two rooms or one indoor room and one shift yard per pair of compatible canids”.

Again, I understand that for a small rescue building more containment is expensive and hard to do. Pack West stated before they acquired Ivar (close to a year ago) that they were hoping to sell the property they are currently based on and relocate the rescue, and I think as such they have chosen to not build any new enclosures due to the resources that would be lost during the move. However, as rescue organizations take in unknown animals, I feel it’s crucial that they have multiple enclosures in which they can quarantine animals, do introductions, give residents breaks from each other, and allow incompatible animals to live separately. I don’t believe it’s responsible for a facility to not prioritize having the appropriate living quarters for the animals they take in at present, even if it means a loss of some resources down the line.

Pack West, to the best of my knowledge, has never had their facility inspected or been licensed by the USDA. I hope I’m wrong on this one, because USDA oversight is a federal requirement for any facility that exhibits animals to the public. While Pack West’s facility is not technically open to the public, they are not exempt from USDA regulation because they use their animals for photoshoots and music videos as well as promotional and fundraising campaigns for the organization. If this is true, it is a huge problem - it is the responsibility of a facility to apply for a license and be inspected before beginning to exhibit animals - and most importantly, it would mean that the facility has never been inspected to make sure that its setup is in accordance with the Animal Welfare Act. I understand that an organization that is trying move would probably prefer not to spend the money to get their current property in accordance with AWA regulations to only to sell it shortly after and start over, but federal animal welfare laws must be first priority. 

I could understand a new organization struggling with maybe one of these issues, but when considered as a whole they don’t represent an ethos of animal management that I’m currently comfortable supporting - especially considering what appears to me to be avoidance of USDA oversight. I do believe in the value of what the organization is hoping to become - as places that do accurate education and outreach about wolfdogs and wolfy-looking dogs are rare - but before I’m willing to publicly support them again, these issues really need to be addressed. 

I’m really scared to post this, because I know it may be interpreted as a betrayal of my previous friendly relationship with the facility, but it is the same due diligence I would give to any other facility when asked about why I would not personally support it. 

Mental illness recovery book upadate:

Hello, i have received the books of everyone who bought it during the fundraising campaign. Unfortunately, my country Puerto Rico got hit by hurricane Irma on Wednesday. The roads to get to the post office are blocked by debris. The road should be cleared between today or tomorrow hopefully. Once it is I will send the books. Sorry for the delay.

Michelle

PS. If I take long to answer emails, it’s because there isn’t electricity yet in the area that I live.

PLEASE HELP- I'm scared and Utah law is ruining our lives.

Hey everyone, I started a fundraising campaign for Utah Out-Of-State Entrapment Suit. Please tap to donate- gf.me/u/stkwu

Here’s the whole story if anyone is interested. we would owe you our lives if you can help us out anything works even 5 cents goes a long way. On top of the charges which can cost up to 3,000 we also have to pay for a lawyer which is another 3,000. I’m only 19 and have no family in Colorado to help me. If you are out there, please find it in your heart to share this post or donate. Thank you so much !

On June 6th, 2017, around 4:00AM (MDT), Jake (passenger) and Olivia (driver) passed a Sheriff’s vehicle at the Silver Reef RD and I-15 junction on our route along California to Colorado. The Sheriff’s vehicle head lights were already on, and, shortly there-after, began to follow our vehicle without pulling us over. We were followed on I-15 for around 8 full minutes before the officer decided to turn on his lights and pull us over.

After pulling off, the officer then came to the passenger side window, and abruptly started treating Jake as if he was conceling multiple weapons under the jacket by his legs. While yelling inaudibly, the officer demanded he lift various clothing items up for him, while he used one hand to hold a flashlight, and another to assist himself with this search.

After deciding Jake had nothing but clothes on, or near his person, the officer stated the reason he pulled us over was due to a failure to signal while changing lanes back at the previous junction (where we originally encountered his vehicle sitting in the median). Acknowledging what the officer had stated, we correctly reply that we’d not changed lanes since long before we passed him, orignally. The officer furthered himself by stating that, even though, we had not changed lanes, we were required to indicate, with our singals, to people merging from Silver Reef RD, that we were not changing lanes. The officer was unable to clarify any questions on how that is physically possible–to stay in the same lane, but use blinkers to indicate that we are staying in the same lane that we currently were already within. We did not pass over any dotted lines.

The officer then proceeded to ask us a couple of questions that somehow lead him to see the inside of Jake’s mouth, where he lost all sense of tact upon believing he had “a green tongue from recently smoking marijuana”. He proceeded to question where we were traveling from/to, in which we responded from Burbank, California to Colorado Springs, Colorado. He went silent for a moment, and quipped that the plates were registered in Ohio… looked at us for a moment, and then stated he could smell traces of marijuana coming from the vehicle.

Immediately upon this revelation, he shouted at us to exit the vehicle as he called for backup. Jake’s statement- I did not witness his first physical interactions with Olivia on the driver’s side of the vehicle. He then came over to me, and shouted for me to stand over 5 feet in front of the car at 4am in the desert. The officer then came over, frisked me, and had me stand in the freezing wind in little more than shorts and t-shirt… all the while, the officer shouted how he had sufficient probable cause to search the vehicle without permission. The officer had a K9, however, it stayed in the officer’s vehicle for the entire stop. The officer did not ask if he had permission to search the vehicle, at any point, and never was permission granted for him to enter our vehicle.

As backup arrived, the original officer proceeded to toss everything out of the vehicle on to the pavement, both behind and on the passenger side of the vehicle. It was easy to hear, from the other side of the vehicle, that the longboards from the car were launched straight into the ground, as was evident afterwards when damage was found on multiple items, including the car’s interior & exterior, the longboards, as well as some memorabilia picked up along our travels. While checking both the inside and outside of the vehicle, the officer tried to break off every compartment our vehicle had. While checking the front end of the vehicle, digging his hands around under the hood, pulling on anything in sight, the car has since made engine noise not previously heard throughout our cross-country trip. While checking the front bumper, he noticed it was cracked near the passenger tire, to which he pulled on, and dug his hands in to, til a distinct cracking sound from the bumper caused him to stop pulling. While on the inside of the vehicle, he yanked on everything trying to get the pieces of the car to come off where they should not. Multiple parts of the interior are now loose, some of which now wiggle freely. The officer also unwrapped a glass pipe that had been purchased in California, still in its original multi-layer wrapping from the glass store it was purchased from–it was a gift for a Colorado friend. Even though it was obvious the pipe had never been used before, I was told we would not be getting it back, along with less than 0.008 pounds of pot (yes, thousandths of a pound, a fraction of 1.0%), and another pipe that had been secured in the glove compartment during our travel back home.

After concluding the hour-long unauthorized search, the cop demanded I clean up the mess stating “so we can get out of here as soon as possible” as he puts Olivia into his cop car. Roughly 15 minutes later, Olivia got out of the cop’s vehicle, and I was called over. The officer asks me if I know my rights, to which I reply kind of, and the officer furthers by saying “like you see on tv. You can deny to answer my questions, and you can have a lawyer” and proceeds to bagger me on why I wasn’t forthcomming about having a green tongue, and why I would lie about smoking when the proof is, apparently, right on my tongue. When asked if I was under arrest, the officer stated “you are and are not under arrest, tonight”.

In summary of my perspective, Olivia and I were legally driving down the road, a cop started following us closely waiting for a mistake, never got a decent enough reason, so he made up a false reason to pull us over, used bad science, such as, “your tongue is green” as probable cause to search our vehicle without consent, ignored any approved drug testings, damaged our property from car interior to exterior, and our possessions, stole an item that, to the best of my knowledge and research, is legal for me to carry in any US State, let alone, every country in the known world, and then the officer got lucky finding a tiny bit of pot while concluding his illegal search from the illegal pull-over.

Worth noting- Olivia and I were pulled over in the same car, at the same time, for the same reason, and only once. She was ticketed first, myself second. Same fines, in both cases, of 1360$ each. Our citations, however, differ massively. According the cop, we were pulled over in largly differing junctions, mile markers, and times (mine states I was ticketed a while before she was, even though they printed Olivia’s ticket a good 15 minutes earlier). From the knowledge of a local cop in my area, this type of illegal cop activity is to create the appearance of 2 seperate pull-overs to inflate a cop’s ticketing quota; the cop was able to make 3.5 grams of marijuana look like it was in two different places at two different times with two different people.“

misskittycoventry  asked:

Mars! I couple months back, you helped me out a ton by sharing a campaign to fundraise for my cat Rhapsody. I just want to update you that she's now up from 5 lbs to 7.5 pounds and she no longer has a heart murmur! If this keeps up, we'll be able to get the permanent treatment and I just want to say thank you for helping us.

THIS IS THE BEST THING IVE HEARD ALL WEEK. Literally made my whooole day.

Please give her a kissy and a pet from me and tell her I love her~~~~

Everyone please wish her well.

anonymous asked:

Sorry, all i see in that 3 little piggies photo is sam's fist.

Oh, you mean the fist that was doing the “bump” with Cait in Cait’s bed at one in the morning to close out the “"Better Together” fundraising campaign for her charity? That fist? That’s all I can see too, anon, and it’s making it very hard to see anything else that has been happening this past weekend.

That fist also made several appearances at Comic Con too, I guess just in case anyone had forgot about Cait’s bedtime fist bump…

Service Dog Fundraiser!

Hey everyone! I plucked up the courage to make this fundraising campaign for the service dog I need. Donations are much appreciated, but certainly not expected. ://www.youcaring.com/mazzieferguson-828647

If you are able to donate, your donation can go toward a variety of services! I think it’s unfair to not be providing a service for anyone’s future donations so here are some incentives:
✨$1: Five pendulum readings

✨$2-$5: One-three tarot card draws depending on the amount

✨$6-$15: A detailed ten card tarot spread!

✨$16-$30: Everything above PLUS a cool gift from my witchy collection! 💜

3

Cherry is hosting her first campaign fundraising party. Which is also my first campaign party.

Cherry: “Ughhh how are we ever going to have everything ready in time? So much to do.”

Fawna: “Ohhh just think of all the food possibilities! I could make a cobbler with some turkey or maybe some sushi and firecracker shrimp. All the possibilities!”

The Duke of Cambridge signs the visitors book at The National Memorial Arboretum after opening the new visitors centre | 29 March 2017

The opening of the Remembrance Centre follows a major fundraising campaign supported by numerous individuals and organisations, including Staffordshire County Council, the Heritage Lottery Fund and The Royal British Legion.