camp liberation

History of Gay Rights in Germany

1794: The Kingdom of Prussia abolishes the death penalty for sodomy

August 29, 1867: Karl Heinrich Ulrichs becomes the first self-proclaimed homosexual to speak out for the repeal of anti-gay laws at the  Congress of German Jurists in Munich.

1869: The term “homosexuality” appears for the first time in a German-Hungarian pamphlet written by human rights campaigner Karl-Maria Kertbeny

1871: Homosexuality is criminalized by Paragraph 175 of the Reich Criminal Code.

1907: Adolf Brand, member of a gay rights organization, publishes a piece “outing” the imperial cancellor of Germany, Prince Bernhard von Bülow. He is sued for libel and is sentenced to 18 months in prison.

1907-1909: The Harden-Eulenburg affair. Even more people are called gay and sue for libel.

1919: Magnus Hirschfeld co-founds the Institut für Sexualwissenschaft (Institute for Sex Research), a pioneer calling for the civil and social acceptance of gay and trans people.

1919: Anders als die Anderen (Different from the Others), one of the first explicitly gay films, premiers. Magnus Hirschfeld was a co-writer and funded its production.

October 16, 1929: A Reichstag Committee votes to repeal Paragraph 175. The Nazis’ rise to power prevents the implementation.

1931: Mädchen in Uniform, one of the first pro-lesbian films, is released.

1933: The Nazi party bans homosexual groups. Gay people are sent to concentration camps. Nazis burn the Institut für Sexualwissenschaften to the ground.

1937: First use of the pink triangle for gay men in concentration camps.

1945: After the liberation of concentration camps by the allied forces, gay people have to serve out the full term of there sentences under Paragraph 175.

1950: East Germany partially abolishes the Nazis’ emendations to Paragraph 175.

1968: East Germany decriminalizes homosexual acts for people over the age of 18.

1969: West Germany decriminalizes homosexual acts.

1974: General Gay Association, the second openly-LGBT rights organization in German history, is established.

1985: Herbert Rusche becomes the first openly-gay member of the Bundestag.

1987: Jutta Oesterle-Schwamm becomes the first lesbian member of the Bundestag.

1994: The Supreme Court rules that the age of consent for sex must be equalized.

2000: The Bundestag apologizes to gays and lesbians persecuted under the Nazi regime, and for “harm done to homosexual citizens up to 1969”.

2001: Same-Sex couples get the right to enter a civil partnership. Klaus Wowereit becomes the first openly-gay major of Berlin, making Berlin the largest city of the world with a gay major. Ole von Beust becomes the first openly-gay major of Hamburg.

2002: Same-sex stepchild adoption is legalized. Guido Westerwelle, leader of the FDP, becomes the first leader of a major party to come out as gay.

2009: Westerwelle becomes the first openly-gay member of the Federal Cabinet

2013: Barbara Hendricks becomes the first openly-lesbian member of the Federal Cabinet

March 22, 2017: The Bundestag votes in favor of rehabilitation for those presecuted under Paragraph 175.

June 30, 2017: Same-Sex marriage and adoption is legalized.

zorilleerrant  asked:

Can you have Cap save baby Magneto?

This actually happened in some of the cartoons! I gasped out loud when I saw it for the first time. (Go to about 10 minutes in for the full scene.) I thought I’d do something a little different, because while I love Erik in the First Class movies, I always wanted a happier ending for him…

The Howling Commandos, as a forward team focused on Hydra, hadn’t liberated many camps; the ones they had were Hydra slave labor camps, where the men were, if not well-fed, then at least not the gaunt, barely-alive prisoners they’d heard about from Red Army soldiers and Allied units. 

This camp was different; at the heart of it was some kind of lab. When Steve battered down the last reinforced door, he found a man holding a gun to the head of a young boy. 

“I’ll kill him,” the man said. Steve didn’t bother with an answer; the shield took the man’s head off before he could threaten the kid again.  

Still, in that second before death, Steve had seen the man’s finger spasm on the trigger, and felt the thickness in the air when the trigger wouldn’t move. He looked at the boy, looked at the body, and had a sense of destiny resettling itself in the world. 

“Was he the camp commander?” he asked the boy, who nodded, huge-eyed. “Commander…Shaw?”

The boy nodded again. He turned and pulled Steve’s now bloody shield out of the concrete wall like it was nothing. Then, with narrowed eyes, he floated it across to him, through the air, without touching it. 

Steve took the shield out of the air, shook off what he could, put it on his back, and said, “Thank you.”

“My pleasure,” the boy said, in trembling English.

“What’s your name, son?”

“Erik Lensherr.”

Steve had seen a lot of things in the war; nothing like this, but there had been signs of strange experiments in Hydra labs. This was comparatively harmless.

“Well, I’ll make you a deal, Erik,” he said. “I won’t tell what I saw here just now, and you help me close this place down. Then we’ll take you to HQ and get you a hot meal. Sound good?”

Erik nodded, then offered, “They knew you were coming. They destroyed all the records.” 

“Doesn’t matter,” Steve said. “Come on.”

In the convoy, bringing the prisoners out of the camp, Steve brought Erik up to the cab of the lead truck, and put him in next to Bucky at the wheel.

“Who’s this?” Bucky asked.

“Erik,” Steve said. “He’s riding with us.”

“Sprichts du English?” Bucky asked. 

“Yes,” Erik replied. “I can speak. English, German, Yiddish, some Russian. Good interpreter. I can work for Allies?” 

“How old are ya?” Bucky asked.

“Sixteen,” Erik said. 

“You are twelve,” Bucky told him.

“I’m just small,” Erik replied.

“Yeah, because you’re twelve,” Bucky insisted. “Well, we’ll make sure the folks handling the refugees take good care of y – “

“No, he’s coming with us,” Steve said. 

“What?” 

“Erik’s coming with us to HQ. We could use an interpreter. And he’s small enough to make a good spy. He’s had enough of camps, ain’t ya, kid?” he asked, and Erik nodded. 

“You wanna join the allies, huh?” Bucky asked.

“I go with Captain America,” Erik announced. 

“Yeah, that’s what I said, and now I know better,” Bucky replied, but he was grinning. “Fine, on your own head be it. Sixteen my ass,” he said to Steve. 

Steve took off his helmet and plopped it onto Erik’s head. “Sorry, got a new sidekick now,” he told Bucky, who laughed. 

Years later, when a magazine asked Erik Lensherr why he agreed to become Captain America after the disappearance of Steve Rogers, he said, “Steve took a terrified twelve-year-old Jewish kid out of a slave labor camp, gave him a helmet, and told him he had power. I believed him. Turns out he was right.” 

ALSO IMAGINE MAGNETO AS CAPTAIN AMERICA WITH THE SHIELD. HOLY CRAP. :D 

Disturbing Documentaries

1. Dreams of a Life (2011)

This documentary tells the story of Joyce Carol Vincent, whose body was found in January 2006, decomposing in her bed in Wood Green, North London. She apparently died unnoticed in December 2003, surrounded by unopened Christmas presents with her TV still turned on. The film interviews various friends, acquaintances, and former partners to try to tell the story of Joyce.

2. The Cheshire Murders (2013)

This film studies the murder-robbery case that occurred on July 23, 2007. Jennifer Hawke-Petit and her two daughters were raped and murdered, while her husband, Dr. William Petit, was injured during a home invasion in Cheshire, Connecticut. This case was referred to as “possibly the most widely publicized crime in the state’s history.”

3. Child of Rage (1992)

The film is based on the true story of Beth Thomas, who suffered from severe behavioral problems as a result of being sexually abused as a child. Beth was adopted after it was found that she was being sexually abused by a family member. During her stay with the family, she tried to kill her brother several times and even attempted to sexually abuse him. The film was shot in Vancouver, British Columbia. 

4. The Imposter (2012)

This documentary is about the 1997 case of the French confidence trickster Frédéric Bourdin, who impersonated Nicholas Barclay, a Texas boy who disappeared at the age of 13 in 1994. The film includes interviews with Bourdin and members of Barclay’s family, as well as actual television news footage

5. Cropsey (2009)   

This film initially begins as an examination of "Cropsey”, a boogeyman-like figure from the New York urban legend, before segueing into the story of Andre Rand, a convicted child kidnapper from Staten Island.

6. The Bridge (2006)

This film covers the depressing truth about the Golden Gate Bridge, capturing a large number of suicides during the documentary.The film also features interviews with family and friends of some of the identified people who had thrown themselves from the bridge that year. The Golden Gate Bridge, which first opened in May 1937, was the most popular suicide site in the world during the documentary’s filming, with approximately 1,200 deaths by 2003

7. There’s Something Wrong With Aunt Diane (2011)

This documentary discusses the traffic collision that occurred on July 26, 2009,  where eight people were killed when a minivan driven by 36-year-old Diane Schuler, after traveling 1.7 miles in the wrong direction on the parkway, collided head-on with an oncoming SUV. The deaths included Schuler, her daughter and three nieces, and the three passengers in the SUV. The crash was the worst fatal motor vehicle accident to occur in Westchester County, New York

8. Capturing the Friedmans (2003)

This film focuses on the 1980s investigation of Arnold Friedman and his son Jesse for child molestation of several of their students. They held computer classes in their home where many children attended. During police interviews, some of the children that the Friedman’s taught reported experiencing bizarre sex games during their computer classes. Arnold Friedman committed suicide in prison in 1995, leaving a $250,000 life insurance benefit to his son. Jesse Friedman was released from New York’s Clinton Correctional Facility in 2001 after serving 13 years of his sentence.

9. Night & Fog (1955)

This documentary depicts the cruel reality of the Nazi Concentration camps. The film features footage from the liberation of camps in 1945 where malnourished humans are seen emerging out of the camps, voicing the life left in their lungs on to the camera.

10. Brothers Keeper (1992)

This documentary follows the case of Delbert Ward, an illiterate 59-year-old dairy farmer who was accused of murdering his brother Bill, in the bed that they shared for 50 years. The Ward brothers were four bachelors ranging between 59-71 and living in extreme poverty. One theory suggests that the slain brother, Bill, suffered the consequence of a sexual act gone wrong. What’s more disturbing is the fact that he was later acquitted of the crime after it was found out that the New York State Police coerced a confession out of him as he was illiterate.

Don’t be afraid to add to this list

When the Nazi concentration camps were liberated by the Allies, it was a time of great jubilation for the tens of thousands of people incarcerated in them. But an often forgotten fact of this time is that prisoners who happened to be wearing the pink triangle (the Nazis’ way of marking and identifying homosexuals) were forced to serve out the rest of their sentence. This was due to a part of German law simply known as “Paragraph 175” which criminalized homosexuality. The law wasn’t repealed until 1969.

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“Evfra’s single-minded dedication to his cause became evident when he led a successful raid on a kett labor camp, liberating hundreds of angaran prisoners before wiping out an entire battalion of kett. ”

So. Evfra. There’s a lot to be said about this badass dude. He’s interesting if for the very fact that he;s known almost completely anecdotally. Every angaran character has an opinion of him, it seems, except for himself. He’s almost like a Chuck Norris joke, and probably has a lot of outlandish untrue(?) stories about himself that only add to his grandeur.

But apparently the kett facility thing wasnt fake, and he did liberate all those angara. So I kinda drew on that and made a younger version of Evfra.

Anyway. I’m tired. Enjoy your slightly satiated Evfra thirst, Andromeda fandom.

My grandfather always served an extra plate

by reddit user shiloh667

My grandfather died two weeks ago. After the funeral, my family sat around my grandmother’s living room, talking about the nice memories we had with him. All of us grandchildren mentioned how he always spoke in different voices when reading, even if it was just the newspaper. We spoke of the stories he used to tell us about his childhood.

Keep reading

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Anne Frank at the Window 

In 1941 a young couple in Amsterdam were married. One wedding guest with a camera shot a home movie of the bride and groom coming out of an apartment building. The camera pans up for a few moments, about six seconds. From this view we see several neighbors leaning out of their windows to watch the wedding party down below. One of these people is a young girl, twelve-year-old Anne Frank. This is the only known footage of her.

A year later Anne would receive her famous diary for her thirteenth birthday. Only a month afterwards, the Frank family and four others would be forced into hiding due to the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands. It was here that Anne would write page after page of her thoughts in her diary, which she later intended to rewrite as a novel. Two years after going into hiding they would all be discovered by the police, arrested, and sent to a concentration camp. 

Anne would die, days after her sister Margot, of starvation and disease in Bergen-Belsen concentration camp around February or March of 1945. It is believed that she died just weeks before the camp was liberated by British soldiers. 

Today Anne’s diary has sold over 30,000,000 copies and has been translated into 67 languages. The young girl filmed at her window has become an international symbol of hope and faith in the goodness of humanity, even in the face of the most extreme adversity.

Gifs colorized by me, footage can be watched here


10 June 1945. Anti-fascist political prisoners who have survived Ohrdruf or Buchenwald concentration camp and were liberated* just 2 months ago, meet in Weimar to form an Anti-Nazi committee. Their job is to collect information on active Nazis and remove them from office. Left to right: Mrs. Eliza Matin, Hugo Gunther, Konrad Wallmuhler, Paul Hockert und Richard Eyermann. 

Foto Archive Buchenwald, number 020-49.005  

* Buchenwald prisoners liberated their own camp shortly before the arrival of the allied soldiers.   

In honor of Yom HaShoah, I wanted to share links to the songs my synagogue performed at our memorial tonight. links are in the titles - just a warning, if you watch the videos on YouTube, some of them do contain Holocaust/Nazi imagery.

El Maleh Rachamim - a prayer traditionally sung at funerals and remembrance days for the dead. it’s a very beautiful melody.

Dos Elnte Kind (The Lonely Child) - a Yiddish song dedicated to Sarah, the daughter of Rachel Pupko-Krinski. they were separated during the war, but both survived and immigrated to America. the woman who sang this at my synagogue this evening was a close friend of Sarah’s daughter, and she was wearing a necklace left to her by Sarah.

Yisrolik - a Yiddish song about orphaned children of the Vilna ghetto

Flying - an English song by folk artist Laura Wetzler, who performed it for us tonight. she and her partner are both the daughters of Holocaust survivors, and she wrote this for her mother-in-law, a partisan whose sister Hannah (ZK”L) was murdered by the Nazis after they were discovered smuggling resistance newspapers

Minutn Fun Bitokhn (Moment of Confidence) - a Yiddish partisan song from Krakow. my favorite line, which isn’t translated exactly the same in the lyrics I found online, is “Revel, dance, you hangman! It won’t be long, I hope. Once there was a Haman–then there was a rope.”

Zog Nit Kein Mol (Never Say) - also known as Partisaner Lid, the Partisan Song, this is one of the most famous songs to come out of the war. it was written by Hirsch Glick (ZK”L) in the Vilna Ghetto after he learned of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising.

Hatikvah (The Hope) - a Hebrew song associated with the Zionist cause, which was often sung in concentration camps after their liberation and in Displaced Person camps (if you look online you can find a recording of the inmates of Bergen-Belsen singing this song in 1945). it is now the national anthem of Israel.

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Between 1933-1945, over 100,000 men were arrested for homosexual acts under Paragraph 175. These men were either sent to prison or to concentration camps. Following liberation of the concentration camps, the majority of those with pink triangles were incarcerated once again to carry out their sentence because they had not yet finished court-mandated terms of imprisonment for homosexual acts. Time spent in concentration camps did not count towards that sentence.

Additionally, those with the pink triangle were not initially officially recognised as Holocaust victims meaning that they were not legally declared as a Holocaust survivor. This meant that they were not entitled to the repatriation and pension that other survivors were entitled to. It is estimated that only 4,000 survived the Holocaust.

A quick google search would show you that.