cameron-blaylock

The Photographers of New York Fashion Week by Cameron Blaylock

Cameron Blaylock is a photographer who took a different approach to New York Fashion Week. Instead of shooting the runway, stylists and models he wanted to show who his fellow photographers were.  A group usually behind the lens, we talked to Cameron to see what inspired this idea and how it went.

See full photo story HERE.

one photo from the collection of Runway Passport’s NYFW Photographer - Mark Luebbers. 

WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO SHOOT THE PHOTOGRAPHERS OF NYFW? 
The idea for the project came out of my inability to shoot inside the Mercedes-Benz building; when I did the project I had been living in New York City for about 5 months and didn’t have many photography connections. So I decided to photograph the fashion photographers milling about Lincoln Center. I was interested in capturing and publishing photos of these anonymous artists who produce widely disseminated images of models. The project was also about meeting other photographers. I wrote down each name and later created a Facebook album with tags. I now enjoy being in touch with some of the photographers I met during the shoot.

 

DID YOU NOTICE ANY DIFFERENCE IN SHOOTING PHOTOGRAPHERS VS PEOPLE YOU NORMALLY SHOOT - DO THEY RESPOND DIFFERENTLY SINCE THEY ARE USED TO BEING ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE LENS?
Most of the fashion photographers were very happy to be photographed. Some of them declined, which really shocked me. I thought, “How can you say ‘no’ when you photograph people without permission all the time?”.

 

WHAT DID YOU LEARN FROM THIS PROJECT?
Most fashion photographers aren’t fashionable dressers. The most important thing for them is to take beautiful photographs of beautiful people.

 

WHAT IS YOUR DREAM PHOTO SHOOT TO DO ONE DAY?
The writer Steven Thomson and I recently had the idea to collaborate on a book about Art Nouveau architecture in the former East Germany. I’d love to see that come to fruition.

HOW DO YOU DESCRIBE YOUR WORK IN GENERAL? 
At the moment, most of the photography I do is commercial, specifically architectural. In my personal work, I try to make something that marries the familiar with the strange or unexpected.

 

WHAT ADVICE DO YOU HAVE FOR ANY STARTING OUT PHOTOGRAPHERS.
Buy a basic DSLR and a few lenses. Be a minimalist for a couple of years: Learn everything you can about that basic DSLR and then move on to fancier equipment if need be. Photography, or at least the type of photography I find interesting, is mostly about composition and concept.