camellia-sinensis

anonymous asked:

how does ash, gwyn, augus and mosk an eran take thier tea? cause i can't decide if gwyn takes two or three sugars and i thought ohhh i'll ask pia also in a human verse what would mosk and erans fashion style be?

Hmm..

Gwyn - As many sugars as possible. Definitely more than 2 or 3. We’ve actually seen this in the canon:

“as Gwyn took four sugar cubes from the small jar provided and plopped each one into his cup.”

He would’ve used more if Augus hadn’t given him a look.

He sometimes uses honey insetad, and he’ll sometimes add milk to it. If he could get away with just having hot sweet milk he would.

Augus - No sugar, no milk, and often herbal, though he’s quite fond of Camellia sinensis provided there’s no sweeteners added (including overly floral scents, like jasmine).

Ash - Whatever Augus is doing. Ash doesn’t often drink tea in the day to day though. He pretty much takes it how Augus takes it, because that’s how he was raised. He’d probably add milk to it though in the human world, but he’s usually getting alcohol.

Mosk - Weak and sweet. No milk/dairy.

Eran - EXTREMELY STRONG. Like ‘oh look my teaspoon’s standing in the drink’ strong. He can handle sweet or not, but the tea generally needs to be black and mean it. Eran loves tea. No milk though. Sweeteners are a yes, but if he commits to them, he commits, no half-assed ‘one teaspoon’ crap. He’s also fond of peppermint as a digestive. Ambaros and afrit are all about strong tea.

*

As for fashion styles, I have no idea! I won’t know until I seriously consider writing an AU with them in it, and the styles would definitely change depending on the AU? Like there’s not just one kind of human Eran and Mosk, just like there’s not just one kind of human Gwyn and Augus.

Like, are they teenagers? In university? What are they studying? When did Mosk lose his family? Or does he still have them? What was Eran’s upbringing like? Etc. That’d change depending on the scenario, and all of that influences fashion choices (especially income). I wish I could give a quick answer to something like that, but I really can’t. I’d hazard that Mosk would probably prefer earthy colours and greens but who knows.

Teas for Witches: the Basics

I can talk about tea literally all day (and I have because I’ve worked in a spice and tea shop for years), and there is SO much to talk about with both health and magical benefits. Teas are made from tea leaves called camellia sinensis, with the exception of herbal teas/infusions. For this, I’m going to list magical and health benefits by type of tea.

Black Tea

Feminine * Earth * Winter * Strength * Stability * Death * Expelling Negativity * Alertness * Energy

Black tea is the most fermented and oxidized of all teas. Its tea leaves look shriveled and black. It combats heart ailments, digestive problems, high cholesterol, asthma, and breast/menstrual problems. Black tea also has a lot of caffeine (47 mg, still less than coffee) and too much of it can cause acidity issues in the stomach.  

Examples: English/Irish Breakfast Tea, Assam, Darjeeling, Lapsung Souchang, Ceylon, Earl Grey

**There is a subset of black tea called Pu-erh, a post-fermented black tea. Some consider this to be the “purest” of all teas and connect it to the aether, as it is rare and valuable.

Green Tea

Masculine * Fire * Summer * Passion * Healing * Conscious Mind * Sexual Health * Love * Energy * Progress * Magic

Green tea is slightly steamed but not fermented, which maintains its green color. It has many health benefits, such as detoxifying, reducing cholesterol and weight, boosting immunity and stamina, and reducing blood glucose. It has less caffeine than black, but still some. 

Examples: Jasmine, Sencha, Matcha, Gyokurocha, Genmaicha, Hojicha, Gunpowder, Dragonwell

Oolong Tea

Feminine * Water * Autumn * Reflection * Meditation * Wisdom * Serenity * Concentration * Romance * Friendship

I always describe Oolong as being between Green and Blacks, since it is half fermented. It can help manage weight and stress, balance blog sugar levels, remove free radicals, and promote healthy skin and bones. HOWEVER, too much can actually speed up bone degradation because it sweeps away excess calcium. And beware of its high caffeine content (I used to drink Raspberry Wulong to pull all-nighters).

Examples: Milk Oolong, Formosa, Wulongs

White Tea

Masculine * Air * Spring * Happiness * Wisdom * Moon * Purification * Protection * Clarity * Cleansing * Beginnings

White tea is a little harder to find. Either the tea leaves are plucked as immature leaves and steamed, or the leaves have not been processed (there seems to be little consensus across cultures). Some have a small amount of caffeine. It’s a great antibacterial and antioxidant, and it improves the heart, oral health, and skin. Drinking a couple cups works better than one, and you can reuse the tea leaves, granted that the second cup will brew longer.

Examples: White teas come in many flavors and are usually labeled as white tea. You may need to seek out a tea shop to find some.

Herbal Tea

Magical properties depend on which herbs are used

This tea seems to be the most popular for witches on tumblr, because it is composed of dry, unprocessed herbs, seeds, fruits, or roots, and has no caffeine (as long as the herb doesn’t!). There are many recipes online as herbals are easy to make. In general, herbal tea promotes calm, reduces cholesterol and risk of heart conditions, cancers, and diabetes. Due to its lack of actual tea leaves it has less antioxidants than other teas. Some don’t even call it a tea, but dub it Herbal Infusion.

Examples: Rooibos, most Chais, Ginseng, Chamomile, Peppermint, Spearmint, Hibiscus

**Yerba Mate is an herbal tea that is notorious for its high caffeine levels (you’ve probably seen the energy drink). It also zaps one’s appetite and can become addictive, so be careful around this tea!

As always, feel free to add/message me of any corrections, and I hope you find your cup of tea!

Sleep savers✨🌙

As we all know, sleep effects your overall well being, health and happiness infinitely! This is an informational post about all the sleep remedies I have tried, enjoy and recommend. All natural, tried and true🌙

Let’s all have a great sleep tonight.

✨Crystals✨
Howlite: for restful sleep. absorbs anger, calming
Amethyst: relieves nightmares & anxiety. strengthens boundaries
Labradorite: grounding, protecting, clears fears that disrupt sleep
Smoky Quartz: grounding, protects from nightmares
Red Jasper: for recalling dreams
Amethyst, Sodalite & Selenite: good for quieting mind chatter

💖Crystals can be used for sleep by putting them under your pillow, on your nightstand, keeping them in your bedroom, or putting them in a sachet with sleep health promoting herbs and hanging them near your bed/under your pillow💖

✨Essential oils✨

Lavender
Cedarwood
Vetiver
Patchouli
Sandalwood
Wild Orange
Bergamot
Roman Chamomile

💖Essential oils can be utilized for improving your sleep by putting them in a diffuser, using incense before bed that are these scents, applying them in a spray to your bedding+pillows💖

A blend I like to use in a spray bottle that I spray on my bedding and especially on my pillows at night! Kid safe and skin safe 😊
1 oz witch hazel
1 oz distilled water
6 drops lavender essential oil
3 drops sweet orange essential oil
3 drops roman chamomile essential oil

Put in spray bottle, shake to mix!

✨Tea✨

To guarantee that a tea will be good for sleep, first make sure that it is caffeine free! Good rule of thumb is that *most* “herbal” blends and Rooibos will be caffeine free because they do not include Camellia sinensis (the “tea” plant that is the base for white,green,oolong,black & puerh teas)
Rooibos is my favourite tea base because it is naturally hydrating, caffeine free, affordable, and super tasty!

💖Plants commonly in tea that promote great sleep💖
Valerian Root
Lemon Balm
Peppermint
Chamomile
Licorice Root

✨Food✨

Almonds
Banana
Cherry juice
Whole grains
Kale
Walnuts
Dark chocolate

✨Plants✨

Aloe Vera
Gardenia
Lavender
Jasmine
Spider Plant
English Ivy

💖Utilize these plants to benefit your sleep by having these plants in your bedroom💖

✨My favourite sleep chant/prayer✨
Goddess above, queen of the night
Help me sleep in your healing light
Restful sleep, come to me
Relax my body, and let my mind be free
Grant me calm and peace tonight, and
Let me wake in the God’s golden light

That’s all I have for now, friends! May your dreams be sweet and you wake up feeling refreshed.

Warm blessings ❤️

5 things everyone should know about tea.

#1

Tea is a natural herb, made from the Camellia plant. Camellia sinensis var. sinensis and Camellia sinensis var. assamica are the two main variants of the same genus, Camellia. The different teas - White, Green, Oolong, Black - are made from the leaves of the same plant with different methods of production and different levels of oxidation accounting for the differences in taste and appearance.

The Dilmah School of Tea

Foodie Friday: Kombucha

Recipe Credit: Brothers Green Eats

Note: When preparing kombucha, you are handling a live bacteria culture in a fermentation process. Should your culture begin to look and smell questionable, do err on the side of caution so as to avoid turning your tea into vinegar or to avoid introducing outside sources of bacteria.

Yields: 2 Gallons

Ingredients:
-12 Bags Black or Green Tea
-16 cups filtered water
-1.5 cups white sugar
-Large jars (disinfected)
-Cheesecloth
-Airtight, seal-able brewing bottles
-Scoby (Symbiotic Culture of Bacteria and Yeast)
-Flavoring agent (recommended fruits, herbs, etc.)

A scoby (the mat of bacteria floating in the jar on the left side of the picture) is a live bacteria culture which breaks down and ferments sweet tea. Scobys are easy to purchase from Amazon - or, if you know somebody who brews kombucha, you can request a scoby from them, as with each fermentation process, the scoby will reproduce and add another layer. It’s recommended that between batches of kombucha, you remove the oldest layer so as to maintain fresh scoby and fresh kombucha. If your first batch does not come out perfect, do not worry! Fermentation takes practice, and with each batch, you will get the hang of it!

1) Bring 8 cups of water to a boil, and steep your tea for about 10 minutes. (You want a very strong brew)

2) Allow the tea to come to room temperature, then transfer into a large jar with the remaining water. Add the sugar and stir to completely dissolve.

3) Add your scoby with some starter kombucha (if you do not have any starter, simply add a little bit of store-bought kombucha - this will increase the acidity and prevent your scoby from dying).

4) Cover the jar with cheesecloth and place in a dark, room temperature place to ferment. (Traditionally, kombucha will be blessed just before setting it aside to ferment). Allow it to sit for 1-2 weeks.

5) After the first ferment, check the kombucha - the color of the brew should have gone from black to golden, and the scoby should appear healthy (no blue, fuzzy bread molds growing on the top layer). If desired, you can check the pH of the kombucha - the goal is 2.5 to 3.5.

6) In your bottles, add some flavoring agents. Remove your scoby from the jar, reserving some of the liquid to help keep it alive. Then fill the bottles with kombucha, leaving a little head space.

7) Allow the bottles to sit for 2-3 days, cracking the top once a day to release excess gas. The kombucha will pressurize and carbonate during this second fermentation.

8) Your kombucha is ready! Refrigerate to halt the fermentation process, and serve cold!

Cook’s Note: When handling your scoby, it’s recommended to do so with clean hands so as to avoid introducing foreign bacteria to the colony. Before handling, wash your hands with a light dish soap (non-antibacterial) or invest in a box of disposable food-safe rubber gloves. This will help prevent your scoby from going bad and will keep the flavors of your kombucha fresh.

Magical Ingredient!

Kombucha has definitely grown in popularity over the last few years, and this is definitely understandable. In addition to its fresh flavors and refreshing fizz, it is also said to have plenty of health benefits - so much so that kombucha has even been called the “elixir of life.”

Here in San Luis, commercially brewed kombucha can be found in any store which sells soda, and a few restaurants have taken to brewing their own kombuchas - a testament to the growing popularity of this delicious beverage.

While the bacteria culture itself might be considered magical (it is the core of the fermentation and carbonation process after all), the magic and history behind tea is absolutely undeniable. Today, we refer to many infusions as “tea,” but true tea is prepared by brewing the leaves of the tea tree itself (camellia sinensis). There are some variations to tea due to the ease by which it can be hybridized, which allows some diversity of flavor and strength to the tea and also allows for regions to have their own “brand” of tea leaves.

Tea drinking has its origins in Eastern Asia, around the Yunnan and Sichuan provinces of China. Here the plant is native, and around the time of the Shang Dynasty the leaves began to be brewed in hot water for medicinal purposes. The drink prepared was a concentrated, bitter infusion that helped stimulate the immune system and help keep the mind awake and focused. Later, during the Tang Dynasty, the practice of tea drinking spread to Korea, Japan, and Vietnam.

Tea drinking would eventually be brought to Europe around the 17th century by the Dutch, who further spread the practice to Germany and France. By the 18th century, tea drinking became widely fashionable in Britain. Tea in Europe was prepared differently than in Asia - the leaves would be allowed to oxidize more than was practiced in Asia, resulting in black tea instead of green or oolong.

For much of the 18th century, tea remained a luxury item in the British Empire, where it was heavily taxed - so much so that it resulted in tea smuggling and several significant historical events, not least of which included the Boston Tea Party (a response of the Tea Act of 1773, which increased the tax on tea). Later on, this desire for tea began to lead to a deficit in trade, and Britain introduced opium to China, an event that would culminate in the Opium Wars.

Desperate to break the Chinese monopoly on the tea trade, Britain began cultivating tea in India between the First and Second Opium wars. The less expensive Indian tea became widely popular, and began to overtake Chinese tea in the industry.

Today, tea is considered to be the most widely consumed beverage in the world after water, and is prepared both green and black in varying ways, from chai to kombucha, to the Star Trek favorite “tea, Earl Grey, hot.” Processing of tea leaves allows for a variety of teas, and its ability to retain aromas allows it to be given additional flavors, such as mint, vanilla, and bergamot. Furthermore, some regions have developed “tea culture” - practices, rituals, and etiquette regarding the preparation, serving, and consumption of tea.

An excellent example of tea culture was recounted to me by my boyfriend, who visited Turkey several years ago. He described being offered tea in every shop and home that he visited, in varying flavors and nearly always served in a small glass with a saucer. To turn down the tea was a faux pas, and to not be offered tea was considered offensive. So enjoyable was his experience that he has since acquired a Turkish tea set, and we occasionally enjoy teas imported from Turkey or brought to us by a friend of ours who holds dual citizenship. 

The health benefits of tea are well known, both as an antioxidant and as an alternative to coffee due to its caffeine content, which helps heighten alertness while maintaining calm in the morning.

In magick, the immediate practice which comes to mind with tea is the practice of tea leaf reading, in which loose leaf green or black tea is prepared and served. The recipient of the reading consumes all but the last few dregs of tea, leaving bits and pieces of tea leaf in the bottom of the cup, which is then swirled  and upended to create patterns on the bottom and sides. These patterns and shapes form the basis of the divination.

Because there is so much economic history behind tea, it can be used in any spells regarding money and prosperity. In addition, it can be added to spells for health, strength, courage, and alertness. Tea can also be used as a money-drawing incense.

For the kitchen witch, tea is indispensable, much like salt or sugar. It forms the basis of many tea spells, and can be used in varying ways. For instance, capturing the healing energies of the sun in sun-brewed tea is a fairly common practice. Sweetened iced tea can be served as a sweetening spell, and serving any kind of tea with intent can make irritable guests more amenable. Tea can be used in baking for the same reasons, resulting in cakes and snacks which have the same properties as long as the intent is added!

For a freebie spell, we can look at one which I use every now and again for my boyfriend, and which I had used almost daily when I was working in the culinary department for a retirement community for a resident who was particularly irritable in the morning. Brew a strong black tea in boiling water (do not stir the bag, and do not ever squeeze the last drops of liquid out of the bag), and fill it with positive intent (for me, usually love, happiness, and calm). Add milk with intent for health, and then inspire sweetness, prosperity, and happiness with honey. Serve while still warm and with a heartfelt smile. Not only does it brighten my boyfriend’s morning, but it worked wonders where the aforementioned resident was concerned.

Consider the benefits tea may bring to your practice. Do you incorporate aspects of tea culture from other parts of the world? Perhaps you’re a fan of a Southern sweet tea spell? Or perhaps you lean toward love and sweetening spells? Maybe you prefer spells prepared over the course of several days, decorating jars for kombucha with sigils and runes for health and prosperity? Regardless, this beverage is steeped in history, and in all of its forms can bring plenty of positive aspects to one’s craft!

May all your meals be blessed! )O(

Camellia sinensis

Camellia Sinensis also known as tea is of the genus Camellia, a genus of flowering plants in the family Theaceae. It is known as the ‘cup that cheers but not inebriates’ but it contains a highly addictive substance, caffeine.

Toxicity

Camellia Sinensis contains caffeine and tannin. Caffeine is addictive and it is said that five cups a day is sufficient to produce addiction - especially as 62% of caffeine comes from tea. Withdrawal or reduced usage after excessive consumptions leads to dizziness, headaches, constipation, indigestion, palpitations and insomnia.

Incidents

A case was reported where a man spent two weeks working away during which he drank fourteen cups of tea a day. On his return home, he resumed his normal intake and suffered ‘the worst hangover’ he’d ever known with headaches, stomach upsets, heart palpitations, sleepless nights and general debility.

In October 2010, a coroner recorded a verdict of accidental death in the case of Michael Bedford, 23, who, in April 2010, swallowed two teaspoons of pure caffeine at a party in Nottinghamshire, UK. The caffeine had been purchased online and the container warned that no more that the equivalent of one-sixteenth of a teaspoon should be taken at a time.

Folklore and Facts

The effects of caffeine addiction are, often, underestimated because it challenges the general view of what being an 'addict’ means. But the physical affects of caffeine withdrawal are well documented and can be similar to withdrawal from tobacco or heroin.