call for justice

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KNOW YOUR WAKANDANS | Okoye

Okoye was one of the first two women to serve as dora milaje when T’Challa reinstated the tradition. (The other was Nakia, see that post.) She has been serving as a bodyguard to the Black Panther since she was about 14. She’s a skilled fighter and trusted implicitly by T’Challa. 

Unlike, Nakia who left the dora milaje, Okoye continued with the group. Her second partner was an American girl called Queen Divine Justice. Okoye appeared in the Black Panther comics as a dora milaje on and off well up into the 2000s. 

I don’t know her whereabouts in the current comics (I don’t believe we have seen her in Ta-Nehisi Coates’ run, but correct me if I am wrong). 

In the comics at least (who knows what they will do in the movie), Okoye and T’Challa do not have a romantic relationship. I think it would be cool to see a powerful woman who is bodyguard to a powerful man (king, no less) without any sort of romantic angle. Yes, she works for him. But he also trusts her implicitly. He knows Okoye can get the job done. 

Okoye will be played by playwright and actress Danai Gurira (The Walking Dead) in the Black Panther film. I look forward to seeing her kick some more ass. I also hope, that since Danai wrote such great female characters in her play “Eclipsed” (which only featured women–no dudes) that maybe she can bring some of that to the dora milaje. 

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Brooklyn, NYC: Justice for Sandra Bland and other Black Women Killed by Police, July 13, 2016.

More than 700 people gathered in Flatbush, Brooklyn, and marched to honor the lives of Sandra Bland and other Black women killed by the police on the anniversary of Sandra Bland’s death. Family members of Kyam Livingston and Shantel Davis called for justice, and the people took over Flatbush Avenue and marched in their name.

Photos: Peoples Power Assemblies

Just so you know, most of the protest tonight in Baltimore was peaceful. Early violence was started by baseball fans. Only twelve people were arrested for later violence (the fires and car smashing videos you’re seeing online) out of the over one thousand people protesting. And just imagine how it would have escalated if Baltimore had lost the baseball game? People like an excuse to be violent. Think about that when you’re watching what the media portrays.

Sourced from BBC two hours ago, by the way.

Planned Parenthood firmly believes in the reproductive justice pillar that people should be able to parent their children without fear that they will be harmed or killed. We stand with those calling for justice for the lives of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile and for laws to change in order to protect Black lives.

Shout out to @repealhydeartpr for the artwork.

BLACK LIVES FUCKING MATTER

STOP SHOOTING US STOP KILLING US STOP BEING SCARED OF US GOD DAMN! MY PEOPLE  ARE DYING BECAUSE OF OUR PIGMENT! A BIOLOGICAL FACTOR THAT CAN ONLY BE DECIDED BY GOD IF YOU ROLL THAT WAY OR SCIENCE IF YOU ROCK THAT WAY! I AM SO ANGRY, SCARED AND CONFUSED. I DONT WANT ANYONE IN MY FAMILY TO BE NEXT SHIT.

A little help Tumblr?

Originally posted by jncera

Hey everyone! So there’s this show called Young Justice about a team made up of well… the younger generation of the Justice League.  

It’s super similar in tone and writing to the original Teen Titans series (RIP).  The show has everyone from Robin/Nightwing, Kid Flash, Artemis, Wonder-Girl, Bat-Girl, to Blue Beetle, and the Runaways.  The cast is huge and really diverse!  

The animation, writing, and voices on this show are top-notch (it was nominated for three Emmys and won one) … unfortunately it lost funding after season two … ending on probably one of the worst cliffhangers/heartbreaks ever. 

Netflix just updated and now has all the episodes.  Fans of the show are really trying to get a third season made and the writers, animators, and voice actors are all on board.  Everyone wants to get back to creating this great show! We just need to show Netflix/The Powers that Be there is still a demand. 

So please, watch Young Justice on Netflix… and keep watching it. Use the hashtag #keepbingingyj on social media! 

If you’re looking for a great animated action/comedy… watch Young Justice. 

Originally posted by fyeahteentitans

If you’re looking for a show with full season story arcs… watch Young Justice.  

If you’re looking for well written male and female characters with emotional depth and excellent backstories… watch Young Justice.  

Originally posted by ayametakara

Even if superhero shows aren’t your thing, open a Netflix tab and just let it play in the background on mute.  Every view counts!  

The Young Justice fandom really needs everyone’s help for this to happen. 

Originally posted by legendofkakarot

Oh really? Is that why at least 11 officers were shot today? And exactly how are we not equal anyway? Name one right you don’t have. Name one law that doesn’t protect you. You want “revenge” on people who never even did a thing to you and you call that justice. Your turn a blind eye to the lives of blacks who die at the hands of other blacks, black officers of the law, and black members of the military. You shriek when someone dares mention the black children who died at the hands of gang violence within black communities without a single white person in sight. You mock and science any black person who doesn’t march in lockstep with your ideology. You don’t want equality, you want entitlement. You want to be treated like the world owes you for something no one living today had anything to do with. You want to be treated like there are no consequences for committing crimes. You want to bypass any actual discussion on relevant issues just to rage and scream and silence and kill and wonder why you aren’t taken seriously.

celestiahly  asked:

hey, i'm sorry to be that white person, but i wanna help fight against police brutality but i don't want my voice to overpower black people, and i really dont wanna be offensive. what can i do?

1. Call out your quiet white friends. If they’re posting videos of cats or their latest sale catch then yeah call em out. Why doesn’t this bother them?
2. If you go to protest, our white allies commonly stand in front as police are less likely to enact violence against you. But also it demonstrates that it is not white against black. This is inhumane vs. Humanity. At any protests I’ve been to that this happened, we were not attacked.
3. Just listen to us. We know better than any dictionary, news article, or statistic what racism does.
4. Contact your local politicians because they are more likely to listen to your call for justice. Ask them what they are doing to increase safety. The answer is not more guns.
5. Boycott with the rest of us. Easy. Do not spend your money with people who do not support human rights.
6. If you see us at work, and we don’t look like we want to talk to yall, don’t take it personally, but we have to reconcile with our mortality everyday in a way most others don’t. We have literally been killed for nothing. Just give us some space cuz there’s no such thing as mental health days.

Feel free to add on.

rawstory.com
‘Hit the ground!’ Trump supporter pulls gun on Black Lives Matter rally in Portland

Hey good news! This guy was arrested!

He pulled a gun on us/the protest while we were standing in front of the police station (can’t bring myself to call it justice centre tbh) around 8.

Apparently he does this with regularity and also keeps a blog that outs trans women.

Kerensa claims, “Strickland takes pictures of women and minorities, puts them online with their names and addresses. He stalks them and harasses them.”

Kerensa said before anyone reached him, Strickland put his hand on his gun, which had been hidden under a rain jacket.

“He swept the crowd a few times with the gun,” said Kerensa. “I saw him take out the regular clip and slot in an extra-capacity magazine. I saw him chamber a round.”

For a moment, it seemed he might open fire as protesters scrambled away and two journalists sprinted toward him.

Strickland alleges he was shoved before he reached for his gun and repeatedly stated, “I feared for my life, that’s why I pulled out my gun.” Kerensa disputed that, claiming no one touched him before, and that he was only lightly pushed away after he grabbed the gun.

When reporters caught up with Strickland, he appeared panicked. The gun was still visible, and at least five rows of bullets could be counted in the magazine sticking out of the gun’s handle in the magazine. Strickland said they were 9mm bullets.

Only a few protesters remained, with some trying to calm him down and offering to take him out for a coffee.

As he retreated from the Black Lives Matter rally, he kept claiming to fear for his life and said he was justified in pulling his gun and threatening to shoot the crowd of unarmed protesters. Asked why he brought a gun to the rally in the first place, Strickland said he had been threatened on social media.

The whole time there was not a police officer in sight, even though the rally was on the steps of the Multnomah County Justice Center where the county sheriff and jail are both located.

The problem today is that politics might once again be moving in the wrong direction.

Julian E. Zelizer draws striking comparisons to the socio-political climate of the United States in1968 and in 2016, particularly as the the federal government falters to address police brutality. Read the excerpt below from “Is America Repeating the Mistakes of 1968?”

The problem today is that politics might once again be moving in the wrong direction, not unlike what happened in 1968. Structural racism has to be addressed, but Obama is a lame-duck president with a Republican Congress that is unwilling to work on any legislative proposal that this White House sends them. The prospects of this Congress making progress on any kind of federal criminal-justice reforms are slim to none. And though Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton has taken a much tougher stand in calling for criminal-justice reform and fighting for racial justice, she does not have an extensive record of dealing with institutional racism, and in the 1990s, she supported federal crime policies that only bolstered the law-and-order approach. Like Humphrey, she has shown a willingness to allow the political fears of the right push her toward a more conservative stance on these issues.