california department of water resources

May 14: Community Celebration of Marsh Creek Watershed

May 14: Community Celebration of Marsh Creek Watershed

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The Friends of Marsh Creek Watershed invite the public to come explore Marsh Creek and the Delta shoreline.  Residents will get a chance to visit the Dutch Slough site and learn about future plans for trails, a community park, restoration along Marsh Creek, and a 1,100 acre tidal marsh restoration at the mouth of Marsh Creek. Everybody is invited to this Community Celebration of Marsh Creek…

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Investigation Into Delta Tunnels Misuse Of Funds

Investigation Into Delta Tunnels Misuse Of Funds

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The ECOreport reposts news of a Federal Investigation in Delta Tunnels Misuse of Funds 

Originally Published on Indybay.com

by Dan Bacher

The Department of Interior’s Inspector General has opened an investigation into the possible illegal use of millions of dollars by the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) in preparing the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Governor Jerry…

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DWR Reaches Agreement with Contra Costa Water District to Address Concerns Related to California WaterFix

DWR Reaches Agreement with Contra Costa Water District to Address Concerns Related to California WaterFix

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SACRAMENTO – The California Department of Water Resources announced Tuesday an agreement with the Contra Costa Water District related to potential water quality impacts to its water supply in the event California WaterFix is built. Editors Note: Restore the Delta Responds to the deal (below) Under the agreement, when California WaterFix becomes operational, the Department of Water Resources (DWR)…

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Jerry Brown's Delta Tunnels Plan Is In Chaos

Jerry Brown’s Delta Tunnels Plan Is In Chaos

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The ECOreport reposts why a coalition of fishing, environmental and farming groups conclude Jerry Brown’s Delta Tunnels Plan is in Chaos

Originally Published on the Daily KOS

by Dan Bacher

Governor Jerry Brown’s California Water Fix to Build the Delta Tunnels, a plan to divert Sacramento River water to corporate agribusiness interests, Southern California water agencies, and oil companies…

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Water is Art
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Today was World Water Day. March 22nd 2016.  The event involved projects of all kinds with participating organizations and individuals all over the world contributing work. One section is the Ideas section. There are three pillars to the projects in the Ideas section, all associated with the twitter hashtag #WaterIs. Water Is: Work Water Is: Change Water Is: Art In the Water Is Art category,…

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DWR Honored with Second National Climate Leadership Award

DWR Honored with Second National Climate Leadership Award

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SACRAMENTO – The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) has been honored by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for its organizational leadership in addressing climate change. “I am proud to distinguish DWR for its outstanding actions and dedication to reduce harmful carbon pollution that leads to climate change,” said EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy. “DWR is leading the way…

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El Nino Effect
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Fisherman Gabriel Barreto stands on the shore of the Magdalena river, the longest and most important river in Colombia, in the city of Honda, January 14, 2016. While flooding and intense rain wreak havoc on several countries in Latin America, El Nino has brought severe drought to Colombia. 
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Dams containing small amounts of water can be seen in a drought affected farming area located west of Melbourne in Australia. Indications are emerging that the current El Nino weather pattern could be easing, after causing drought and other extreme weather affecting millions of people. The ongoing El Nino has already been linked to serious crop damage, forest fires and flash floods. An El Nino, a warming of sea-surface temperatures in the Pacific, typically leads to scorching weather across Asia and East Africa, but heavy rains and floods in South America.
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Farmers chat near dried maize at a field in Wesselsbron, a small maize farming town in the Free State province of South Africa. About 14 million people face hunger in Southern Africa because of a drought that has been exacerbated by El Nino, says the United Nations World Food Programme.
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Wind damage by a possible tornado is seen at a commercial building after an El Nino-strengthened storm in Vernon, California.
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Morning commuter traffic travels through a section of ground fog following an El Nino-strengthened storm in Solana Beach, California.
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A worker wades through the flooded 5 freeway after an El Nino-strengthened storm brought rain to Los Angeles. 
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A California Highway Patrol officer gestures at motorists after rocks and debris fell on Malibu Canyon Road following a El-Nino strengthened storm.
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A man sits near houses partially submerged in flood waters in Asuncion, December 27, 2015. More than 100,000 people had to evacuate from their homes in the bordering areas of Paraguay, Uruguay, Brazil and Argentina due to severe flooding in the wake of heavy summer rains brought on by El Nino.
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Fresh snow clings to trees near Big Bend, California.
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A farmer inspects the soil ahead of planting at a maize field in Wesselsbron, a small maize farming town in the Free State province of South Africa.
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A driver climbs out of a window of his car after driving onto a flooded road in Van Nuys, California.
New Post has been published on thecherrycreeknews.com

New Post has been published on http://www.thecherrycreeknews.com/nasa-arctic-field-campaign-to-examine-ecosystem-impacts-of-changing-climate/

NASA Arctic Field Campaign to Examine Ecosystem Impacts of Changing Climate

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As part of a broad effort to study the environmental and societal effects of climate change, NASA has begun a multi-year field campaign to investigate ecological impacts of the rapidly changing climate in Alaska and northwestern Canada, such as the thawing of permafrost, wildfires and changes to wildlife habitats.

The Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) will bring together on-the-ground research in Alaska and northwestern Canada with data collected by NASA airborne instruments, satellites and other agency programs, including SMAPOCO-2, and upcoming ICESat-2 and NISAR missions.

Over the next decade, scientists from NASA and other public and private organizations will investigate questions about the formidable region that spans about 2.5 million square miles (6.4 million square kilometers).

“Boreal forests and tundra are critical for understanding the ecological impacts of Earth’s changing climate,” said Jack Kaye, associate director for research in NASA’s Earth Science Division in Washington. “These ecosystems hold a third of the carbon stored on land – in trees, shrubs, and the frozen ground of the permafrost. That’s a lot of potential greenhouse gases in play. We need to better understand these ecosystems, and how a warming climate will affect forests, wildlife and communities both regionally and globally.”

ABoVE includes three project phases and two seasons of intensive airborne surveys. The research activities will be coordinated with other U.S. and Canadian partner organizations. The 21 projects selected for the first phase will investigate topics such as the impacts of wildfire on ecosystems and insect outbreaks on forest health.

“The region is rapidly changing, and we’ve already seen a lot of that from field measurements and remote sensing,” said Scott Goetz, ABoVE science team lead and deputy director at Woods Hole Research Center in Falmouth, Massachusetts. “It’s an area that’s warming with climate change, and there’s a lot of potential for permafrost degradation, especially with these massive fires burning off the organic soil layer.”

The field campaign will provide an opportunity to study how Arctic ecosystems respond to the scorching fires on a regional scale. More than 5 million acres in Alaska and 9.7 million acres in Canada have burned so far this year, making 2015 the second most devastating fire year on record for Alaska, with the most intensive three-week period of burning on record, according to Charles Miller, deputy science team lead for ABoVE at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California.

ABoVE researchers will survey Alaska’s interior forests to better determine how much carbon is stored in these remote regions. They’ll investigate the extent and thawing rate of permafrost – soils that have been frozen for hundreds of thousands of years, locking in carbon-rich plant and organic matter.

“Warming air temperatures can thaw permafrost, which acts like unplugging a deep freezer,” said Peter Griffith, ABoVE chief support scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. “The vegetation and carbon previously frozen in the soil starts to rot and decay – like food in an unplugged freezer – releasing methane and carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. This increase in greenhouse gases further warms air temperatures, perpetuating the cycle by causing more thawing and more greenhouse gas release.”

The ABoVE projects also will study impacts on the wildlife of Alaska and northern Canada, including habitat and migration changes for raptors, songbirds, Dall sheep, moose, caribou, wolves and brown bears.

The socio-ecological impacts of climate change will be a significant focus of the campaign. The Dall sheep study, for example, will examine the effects of their changing habitat on subsistence hunting and tourism. Another researcher group will work with village residents in the Yukon-Kuskokwim River Delta of western Alaska to track changes in vegetation, permafrost, fire and lakes.

“More societal impacts of change will be investigated in future projects, with another call for projects scheduled for 12 to 18 months from now,” Griffith said. “What’s happening in the Arctic is not staying in the Arctic. It certainly matters to the people who live there, but the consequences are far reaching.”

The ABoVE field campaign’s research agenda was developed through workshops that brought together scientific experts from across the United States and Canada, and builds on ongoing NASA projects including the Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) and Airborne Microwave Observatory of Subcanopy and Subsurface (AirMOSS) airborne missions.

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