calification

Azaj,17, Oakland, Calif. Transgender girl. Part 1

1-As long as I can remember I always knew I was a girl. I was just very feminine, not because I tried to be, but because it was just natural. I remember when I was in elementary school everything was separated by girl and boy, it was confusing for me because I was a boy physically, but was a girl with my heart, mind and soul. It was not until I was in the 6th grade that I came across the term transgender and when I did so many questions I had started to be answered. I finally felt like I knew who I am. I knew I could trust it because it made me feel complete, that confused feeling was no longer there, but it was still a secret.

2.  It was not until I was in the 10th grade that I came out as transgender. I was really difficult because I was so used to hiding myself, but when my friends gave me the courage I needed I was unstoppable. I was finally being myself. I was wearing make-up and the clothes I wanted to wear. I truly believe I was a happier person once I came out. I started to regain that light I lost as kid. I wanted to spread my pretty colors everywhere! I had to show everyone that I had found my place in this world and that is anywhere I choose to be.

4. It is really different living as myself. I never thought that this would be happening. Before I felt like I was always trying to squeeze into jeans that were 6 sizes too small, but now it feels like am in jeans that were made just for me. I don’t feel uncomfortable. I am not always sad or overly upset. I am free. I now feel like I have a purpose. I no longer wake up hating myself or this world that does not understand me. I wake up with a smile, not because my life is so great, but because I love who I am. We will not hide anymore!

5. Have people you know been supportive?

Yes, I have a really great support system. My friends and family loves me for me and I am so grateful, but I mean not everyone I have told supports me.  It is something that comes with being transgender. People come and go in life and it hurts, however life goes on. I was told by my aunt that I am not in charge of anyone’s happiness, but my own. I strongly agree! If you support me I have room your opinions and ideas, but if you don’t you should have nothing to say about what I am or what I do in my life.  

Photo by Annie Tritt

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Image: Dr. Vanessa Grubbs and Robert Phillips at their wedding in August 2005. (Courtesy of Vanessa Grubbs)

When she was a primary care doctor in Oakland, Calif., Vanessa Grubbs fell in love with a man who had been living with kidney disease since he was a teenager. 

Their relationship brought Grubbs face to face with the dilemmas of kidney transplantation — and the racial biases she found to be embedded in the way donated kidneys are allocated. Robert Phillips, who eventually became her husband, had waited years for a transplant, and Grubbs ended up donating one of her own kidneys to him. And along the way she found a new calling as a nephrologist — a kidney doctor.

She shares her story in a new memoir called Hundreds of Interlaced Fingers: A Kidney Doctor’s Search for the Perfect Match.

‘Interlaced Fingers’ Traces Roots Of Racial Disparity In Kidney Transplants

World renowned K-Pop band, BTS, received custom Anaheim Ducks jerseys from Honda Center’s President, Tim Ryan and Director of Booking, JoAnn Armstrong and Senior Vice President of AEG Live/Goldenvoice, Susan Rosenbluth, on Saturday, April 1 before performing to two sold-out crowds at Honda Center in Anaheim, Calif.

nyti.ms
To Understand Rising Inequality, Consider the Janitors at Two Top Companies, Then and Now
Focusing on core competence and outsourcing the rest has made U.S. companies lean, nimble and productive. It has also left lots of people worse off.
By Neil Irwin

By Neil Irwin

Gail Evans and Marta Ramos have one thing in common: They have each cleaned offices for one of the most innovative, profitable and all-around successful companies in the United States.

For Ms. Evans, that meant being a janitor in Building 326 at Eastman Kodak’s campus in Rochester in the early 1980s. For Ms. Ramos, that means cleaning at Apple’s headquarters in Cupertino, Calif., in the present day.

In the 35 years between their jobs as janitors, corporations across America have flocked to a new management theory: Focus on core competence and outsource the rest. The approach has made companies more nimble and more productive, and delivered huge profits for shareholders. It has also fueled inequality and helps explain why many working-class Americans are struggling even in an ostensibly healthy economy.

The $16.60 per hour Ms. Ramos earns as a janitor at Apple works out to about the same in inflation-adjusted terms as what Ms. Evans earned 35 years ago. But that’s where the similarities end.

Ms. Evans was a full-time employee of Kodak. She received more than four weeks of paid vacation per year, reimbursement of some tuition costs to go to college part time, and a bonus payment every March. When the facility she cleaned was shut down, the company found another job for her: cutting film.

Ms. Ramos is an employee of a contractor that Apple uses to keep its facilities clean. She hasn’t taken a vacation in years, because she can’t afford the lost wages. Going back to school is similarly out of reach. There are certainly no bonuses, nor even a remote possibility of being transferred to some other role at Apple.

Yet the biggest difference between their two experiences is in the opportunities they created. A manager learned that Ms. Evans was taking computer classes while she was working as a janitor and asked her to teach some other employees how to use spreadsheet software to track inventory. When she eventually finished her college degree in 1987, she was promoted to a professional-track job in information technology.

Less than a decade later, Ms. Evans was chief technology officer of the whole company, and she has had a long career since as a senior executive at other top companies. Ms. Ramos sees the only advancement possibility as becoming a team leader keeping tabs on a few other janitors, which pays an extra 50 cents an hour.

They both spent a lot of time cleaning floors. The difference is, for Ms. Ramos, that work is also a ceiling.

Continue reading the main story

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A wildfire in the foothills near Yosemite National Park has consumed eight structures — and is threatening 1,500 more in tiny Mariposa, Calif.

The town’s 2,000 residents have been ordered to evacuate because of the blaze known as the Detwiler Fire, and Gov. Jerry Brown has issued a state of emergency for Mariposa County.

The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, known as Cal Fire, posted on its website that “firefighters experienced extreme and aggressive fire behavior” on Tuesday. “Firefighters on the ground as well as aircraft are actively working to contain and suppress the fire.”

‘Extreme And Aggressive’ California Wildfires Force Thousands To Evacuate

Photos: Josh Edelson/AFP and Justin Sullivan/Getty Images