caleb-cole

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Caleb Cole: Odd One Out:

The images in Odd One Out began as found photographs, purchased in antique stores and estate sales, of groups of people during special events, reunions, and family gatherings. The photographs are the spoils of a hunt, the proceeds of afternoons spent looking into the eyes of people I do not know and who may no longer be living. I select images of people who, unlike the rest of the smiling faces in the frame, bear looks of loneliness and longing that stop me in my tracks.

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Other People’s Clothes

What is it like in someone else’s shoes? Caleb Cole’s series, “Other People’s Clothes,” brings us a step closer. This collection of non-traditional self-portraits are a product of Cole’s exploration, wondering what someone else’s life is like. Each photograph in the series is a constructed scene that begins with an outfit or piece of clothing (either bought, found, or borrowed), then a person Cole imagined to fill those clothes, and then a location is chosen. In a statement on Cole’s website he says, “they are portraits of people I have never met but with whom I feel familiar, as well as documents of the process wherein I try on the transitional moments of others’ lives in order to better understand my own.”

The book, “Other People’s Clothes” is available through Cole’s website in a limited edition of 250. As a winner of the Hearst 8×10 Photography Biennial, Cole’s images are currently on view in the atrium at the Hearst Tower through August 31st.

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’Other People’s Clothes’: A Photographer’s Humorous Self-Portraits Imagine the Lives of Strangers

Boston-based photographer Caleb Cole’s curiosity about the lives of others led him to make his amusing series Other People’s Clothes. In the series, he becomes the stranger by using scavenged clothing and a location in which to create these imagined stories of strangers’ lives.There is an underlying empathy in Cole’s work, even if the humor is front and center. About the deeper meaning behind his witty portraits, Cole says, “Though I am the physical subject of these images, they are not traditional self-portraits. They are portraits of people I have never met but with whom I feel familiar, as well as documents of the process wherein I try on the transitional moments of others’ lives in order to better understand my own.”

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From our November 2012 Journal (V2, 2):  In an excellent audio interview, Kris Wiltons sits down with artist Caleb Cole and speaks about “how his own appearance and history inform the work, about letting questions drive a project, and about why seeing men in dresses makes people laugh” [continued at Big Red & Shiny…]

Caleb Cole, Her Reflection, Archival Inkjet Print, 2007