cakewalk

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Biochemistry I, Lecture 2, (9/1/15).

Biochem so far seems to be a cakewalk, which is worrying me…I can’t tell if the class is just slow-paced or what, but I’ve never had a chemistry course that was this slow and it’s freaking me out. On the bright side, I bought my Adonit Jot Script 2! (Of course, the moment I finally splurge on a new stylus, Adonit comes out with the Jot Dash, which I DESPERATELY WANT AND DESIRE). I’m still adjusting to the Script, so apologies because my handwriting will be poor for awhile.

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Cakewalk

“The cakewalk was originally a plantation dance, just a happy movement [the slaves] did to the banjo music because they couldn’t stand still. It was generally on Sundays, when there was little work, that the slaves both young and old would dress up in hand-me-down finery to do a high-kicking, prancing walk-around.

They did a take-off on the manners of the white folks in the "big house”, but their masters, who gathered around to watch the fun, missed the point. It’s supposed to be that the custom of a prize started with the master giving a cake to the couple that did the proudest movement.“ 

The Cakewalk was meant "to satirize the competing culture of supposedly ‘superior’ whites. Slaveholders were able to dismiss its threat in their own minds by considering it as a simple performance which existed for their own pleasure”

There is perhaps a pleasant irony in the fact that the slave owners would imitate the slaves’ Cakewalk not realising that it was already an imitation of their own absurd dances and were, thereby, mocking themselves!

EDIT: According to duh doy dorothy, who knows far more on the subject than I do, “slave owners knew cakewalks were simulating formal white dances, they just didn’t allow themselves to believe slaves had the ability to satirize consciously. White people didn’t cake walk until post-emancipation.”

[Sources: Wikipedia | Image One | Image Two | Image Four | Video]

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“I was at the Oscars, waiting to hear if my name was called, and I kept thinking, Cakewalk, cakewalk, cakewalk. I thought, Why is ‘cakewalk’ stuck in my head? And then, as I started to walk up the stairs and the fabric from my dress tucked under my feet, I realized my stylist had told me, ‘Kick, walk, kick, walk.’ You are supposed to kick the dress out while you walk, and I totally forgot because I was thinking about cake! And that’s why I fell,” – Jennifer Lawrence

buzzfeed.com
The Vaudeville Actress Who Refused To Be A Stereotype

Aida Overton Walker was an African-American singer, actress, dancer, and choreographer that broke down barriers. Her career did not come to end following her husband’s death quite the contrary it escalated until her untimely young passing.

Because history plays a direct roll in what occurs in the present. Because Aida Overton was a woman of many talents. Because I first discovered her work in the college library play section. Because what she did during the 1900s affects how I approach my work till this day. Because I just may be obsessed with her. 

http://blackacts.commons.yale.edu/exhibits/show/blackacts/walker

I was at the Oscars, waiting to hear
 if my name was called, and I kept thinking, Cakewalk, cakewalk, cakewalk. I thought, Why is ‘cakewalk’ stuck in my head? And then, as I started to walk up the stairs and the fabric from my dress tucked under my feet, I realized my stylist had told me, ‘Kick, walk, kick, walk.’ You are supposed to kick the dress out while you walk, and I totally forgot because I was thinking about cake! And that’s why I fell.
—  Jennifer Lawrence, W magazine 2014
The Cakewalk

Yesterday we mentioned the cakewalk in the post on Aida Overton Walker. My elementary school used to have cakewalks at festivals: a group of people would walk around a circle with numbered spaces while music played. When the music stopped, they pulled a number out of a hat, and the person standing on that number won a cake. Fun times! Who knew it holds a place in Black History?


The cakewalk came to national attention at the 1876 Philadelphia Centennial. There was an exhibit featuring slaves on a plantation singing folk songs and doing a “chalk-line walk.” The slaves would line up and couples would prance down a line or in a circle. The best performers won a cake.

By 1877, minstrel shows had begun including the dance. At the time, it was only performed by men, but eventually women performers were included. The shows and dances were a big success all around the country and even in Europe, as Aida Overton Walker’s trip to England shows. Aida Overton Walker helped to popularize the dance and raise it to a level of respectability.

As a popular social dance, the cakewalk was a competition in which the couples performing the most fancy steps would receive a cake. In the ministrel shows, the cakewalk was exaggerated and goofy, showing the “Black” dancers as attempting to dance like high-society Whites.

But the origins of the cakewalk are on Southern plantations, when slaves would gather to mock the formal ballroom dance steps of their White owners. Eventually, the owners began to organize and judge competitions on the weekends. The Whites thought the dances were just funny slave dances, not realizing the original intent.

The cakewalk was the first social dance craze in the U.S. Was it also one of the first times White society co-opted Black cultural forms? (This reminds me of the Harlem Shake controversy). The cakewalk contributed to the development of jazz and ragtime music. It also attributed to several phrases, like “That takes the cake!” and “Piece of cake”, the latter because of the association with the weekend.

See videos of the cakewalk here: http://www.streetswing.com/histmain/z3cake1.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cakewalk

http://www.aaregistry.org/historic_events/view/cakewalk-black-expression-through-dance

http://globetrotterdiaries.com/tidbits-2/the-history-of-the-cakewalk-satirizing-the-satire

http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/explainer/2003/04/where_do_cakewalks_come_from.html