cabbage-varieties

so, it’s implied Percy is able to control blood/humans, so i decided to do some research to compile a list of things Percy could theoretically control:

Adult humans are about 60% water. Blood by itself is about 92% water. Going by water content of blood, Percy is theoretically able to control the following:

  • Blood, watermelons, strawberries,cauliflower, eggplant, red cabbage, peppers, spinach, some varieties of seaweed,  (92% water)
  • Green cabbage (93% water)
  • Tomato (94% water)
  • Jellyfish, zucchini, radish and celery (95% water)
  • Cucumber and lettuce (96% water)

Going by body water content, Percy would also be able to control the following:

  • Adult humans, spiders, dogs (60-80% water)
  • Fish (80% water)

and that was as much as i could find using google for half an hour

Guffgaff: Momo

INTRODUCTION

They resemble little pieces of the Moon. They taste like the heavens itself. It’s perfection wrapped in muchheko maida (dough of white flour). Offer it and no one can refuse it; the de facto national food of Nepal, मम: (ideally ‘mamah’ but is written more as ‘momo’) has been warming the hearts, souls and obviously the tummies of millions of Nepalis worldwide. 

What is momo? I can hear thousands of people *gasp* as I say that. No Nepali blog can be complete without momo! However, those who have not been acquainted much with the Nepali culture cannot be blamed. Momo is a type of dumpling, much like the Japanese Gyoza or perhaps the Chinese Jiaozi

Round type Momo

The Nepali diaspora has such an affair with momo that I believe there are quite the variety of words. Now, I shall dive into the details of the momo. Physically speaking, it has two primary forms: crescent-shape and round-shape. Aesthetically speaking, I prefer the crescent-shaped momo. It is white in colour due to the white flour dough used to make the cover (खोल /khol/).

   .

PREPARING THE INGREDIENTS 

Just like how we cannot describe a person from the outside, we cannot simply know what momo is without knowing the inside. Inside the pouch there is a filling. The filling is usually of meat like Chicken, Buff (buffalo meat), Pork etc. but it is not uncommon to hear vegetarian varieties (like cabbage and paneer?). However you can fill any material you like as long as you cook it thoroughly (I guess goat meat is an exception). 

Despite what you think, making momo isn’t easy!!!

The filling is not simply meat or some vegetable. It contains the following base ingredients, roughly:

  • Minced Meat/Vegetable of choice
  • Diced Onion 
  • Salt
  • Coriander
  • Ginger
  • Monosodium Glutamate (popularly called ‘Ajinomoto’ here)
  • Oil (if the meat/vegetable is dry…e.g. chicken)

Some people (especially in the Kathmandu valley) add ‘Momo masala’ to the above filling. Some people even add tomatoes and god-knows-what ingredients. The masala is in fact even an ice-breaker; some people swear by it, some people swear at it. Personally, I prefer the much simpler-and-superior tasting non-momo masala version. However, it is upto one’s personal preference! 

Dicing the onion by itself is a mammoth task. Just imagine; one onion is enough to wreck havoc with your eyes. Now imagine having to cut a minimum of 5-6 onions into tiny dices! Yes, the onion has to be small dices; it provides the texture and flavour to the momo. Unfortunately within my family, I am that unfortunate dicer. You do not know how creative people can be with this thing. Whether it be freezing the onions, cutting it underwater, using swimming goggles, fans etc. people have their own ways to tackle such a literally eye-watering task.

Dicing onion

Another back-breaking task is mincing the meat. While not as malicious as the onions, you need to mince the meat with a cleaving knife fine enough for a good texture (but not so fine that it tastes like eating powdered filling). It is an art by itself. Fortunately, you can buy already minced meat at supermarkets or the local butcher can do it for you. Vegetarians need not glee at this point because you need to chop the vegetables down as well. 

Now you roll the dough! Not really, we still have the white flour sitting in some tokri (container). So you get some water and knead the flour until you get the dough. If it ‘needs’ more water, you ‘knead’ the dough by adding more water. Anyway, after you are done with the dough (hold the yeast!), you now begin your tedious journey to momo salvation.

  .

MAKING THE MOMO

The first step in making the momo is ensuring you are a Ph.D in the art of Origami folding. The next step is making sure you have at least a degree in getting the shape right, with a minor in filling the adequate amount of filing. 

Well you actually don’t need the above to make momo at least. However, making momo is a terrific skill. I still can’t make those annoying muja (folds) right. Before that, you need to set the dough into a round shape. You chop the dough into lumps that are about the size of half of an average walnut. Next, you roll them with a belan (rolling pin) into neat circular shapes. 

If you are lazy, then you simply flatten the dough into a long rectangular sheets and then use a cup (or something circular) to cut neat circular shapes. If you are even lazier, then you can buy pre-made ones. If you are lazy beyond this point then just buy frozen momos or order them from somewhere.

Filling the momo

Now that you have the wrapper, you fill it with the filling by placing it in the centre of the wrapper. Now you begin wrapping it to form a neat shape. You finally close it and then you have one momo! Repeat till you get a sizable amount. Arrange the momo on the मक्टु (maktu) and take it to the steamer. मक्टु (maktu) is the sub-component of the steamer [creatively called ‘momo ko bhada’ (untensil of momo)]. 

  .

COOKING THE MOMO (AND ACHAR)

You must first ensure that steam is actually coming out of the steamer. Now that you have kept the momo in the steamer, you now patiently wait for 15-25 minutes for the momo to cook. Harder meats like buff take longer time to cook, while softer meats like chicken cook in ~18 minutes. Care must be taken to avoid over-cooking it. If you overcook momo, it becomes ‘fyaatta’ (deformed due to overcooking). 

Momo in a maktu; notice the crescent-shaped momo and the arrangement

To ensure even cooking throughout the maktus, you have to periodically shift them up and down to ensure even cooking. There is a little trick that tells you if the momo is cooked or not; if it is shiny, then it is cooked. If it is still matte, then you need to cook it more. If it looks like a mini atom bomb went off inside each momo, then you probably overcooked it.

Now that your momo is cooking, you make the achar (pickle) for dipping. One faux pas in eating momo is using ketchup as your momo ko achar (pickle for momo) . Please never use ketchup, I swear that’s an unwritten taboo.  

You momo ko achar is usually made of tomato, coriander leaves, salt and chilli. However, you can also find the yellow one (made of peanuts), fierce red (made of chilli and salt only) or dips made of many other ingredients (like Szechuan pepper for instance).

Now that everything is done, you can enjoy you momo in peace! 

  .

THE VARIETIES OF MOMO

What I have described above is the basis of all the other varieties of momos. People have experimented with lots and lots of varieties (naturally). Some of the common ones are:

  • कोथे (kothe) = Pan-fried steamed momo, such that only portions of it is brown. Kothe momo is usually made from the leftover momo that has stood in the fridge for some time.
  • Fried = Like kothe, but fried such that the outer skin is golden in colour.
  • C = Short for ‘Chilly momo’, it is steamed (or fried) momo that is dunked in hot, savory sauce 
  • Momocha = Used to describe the atypical masala-flavoured buff-meat filled round momo
  • Sui mai = Open type of momo 
  • Jhol momo = Momo dunked in soup

Kothe momo

I have even seen the terrifically-coloured ‘Green momo’. I am not interested to eat it, though. Oh the creativity of people engages me sometimes.

  .

MOMOMANIA

Whether it be the old grandmother or the bubbly 10 year old boy, everyone loves momos (hold the few special snowflakes who don’t eat anything but imported foie gras or steak tartare perhaps). Whether it be that fancy restaurant or that momo-thela (stall) on the streets, momo is everywhere. Italian restaurant? Oh look, momo! Bakery cafe? Momo! The funny thing is that ‘bakery’ cafe actually holds an annual momo festival in Nepal. In fact, a restaurant’s success and merit is often based on the quality of their momo. The first thing you order in a restaurant? Momo!

Momo is ubiquitous in our daily lives. Whether you like it or hate it, you can’t deny that momo has its own special place in being ‘Nepali’ along with perhaps the song ‘Yo man ta mero Nepali ho’ and the slogan ‘Buddha was born in Nepal’. 

East or west, momo is definitely one of the best things in Nepal.

The signs and their spirit vegetable

Aries: Zucchini

Taurus: Orange gourd

Gemini: A set of Ikea hemnes drawers

Cancer: Rather offensive cabbage

Leo: I was going to put tomato, but let’s not re-open that can of worms so carrots.

Virgo: Kale

Libra: Sierra Leone bologi. And no, that’s not something ridiculous I made up, google it it’s actually quite interesting.

Scorpio: Jeremy Renner’s left shoe.

Sagittarius: Arugula

Aquarius: Rotten celery

Capricorn: Messier 31

Pisces: Slightly less offensive cabbage

paintedinsane  asked:

Yea but what fruits do they like. And nuts. Oh I tried feeding my crabs some meal worm but they wouldn't eat it. Right now they only eat bloodworms. Carrot. Banana in a blue moon. And some dried shrimp. And I KNOW they need more than that.

Here is the SAFE FOOD LIST made by the Hermit Crab Association which can also be found on the hermitcrabassociation.com website.

Acorns
Agave^
Alfalfa
Almonds
Aloe^
Amaranth
Anchovy oil
Apples and natural unsweetened apple sauce
Apricot
Arame (seaweed)
Artichokes
Ash Wood^
Asian Pear^
Asparagus
Avocado
Bamboo
Banana
Barley
Basil, whole plant^
Beans
Bee pollen
Beef, unseasoned^
Beets (whole plant)
Bell peppers
Birch Wood^
Bison^
Blackberries, leaves & flowers
Blackstrap molasses (unsulfured) - amazingly high in nutrients such as calcium and potassium; 1-2 times monthly
Bladderwrack
Bloodworms (alive or dead)
Blueberries
Borage blossoms (Borago officinalis)
Broccoli and leaves
Brown rice
Brussels sprouts
Burning Bush (entire plant)^
Buttercup (only when dried)^
Cabbage (all varieties)
Calcium carbonate powder, plain
Calendula flowers (Calendula officinalis)-Also known as “pot marigolds”
Camellia (Camellia japonica)
Canteloupe
Caribou^
Carnation flowers (Dianthus caryophyllus)
Carrots and carrot tops
Cashiews, unsalted^
Catappa Leaves (do not confuse with Catalpa or Catawpa!)
Catfish^
Cauliflower and leaves
Celery (all parts)
Cereal; Brown rice, soy, wheat or 7 grain, muesli
Chamomile flowers
Chard
Cheese (be sure to get all natural varieties, serve as occasional treat)
Cherimoya
Cherry, fruit and wood^
Chestnuts
Chia^
Chicken, cooked and unseasoned (smash the bone for marrow access)
Chickpea
Chickweed
Cholla wood
Cilantro
Citrus (all fruits)
Claci worms^
Clams
Clover blossoms and leaves
Cochineal^
Coconut meat, oil, water, and shells
Cod liver oil
Cod^
Collards
Coral, untreated^
Cork bark
Corn (on the cob, too)
Cornmeal
Crabapple^
Cranberries
Crickets
Crustaceans (any and all crustacea including crayfish, lobster, shrimp and other crabs)
Cucumber
Currants
Cuttlefish
Dairy products (milk, cheese, live-culture yogurt) **
Daisies (Bellis perennis)
Dandelion flowers, leaves and roots (Taraxacum officinale)
Dates^
Day lilies (Hemerocallis)
Duck^
Earthworms (collected away from pesticides)^
Edamame (soybean)^
Egg and Eggshells, cooked
Eggplant
Elderberry flowers (Sambucus canadensis)
Elk^
Extra-virgin olive oil
Feces (any animal feces wild or domestic that has a healthy (and preferably whole foods) diet and is not on any medication now or in the near past)^
Feeder cockroaches, dead^
Fennel^
Fig
Filberts^
Fish flakes w/out chemical preservatives
Fish Oil
Fish, all species^
Flax seed oil (small amounts infrequently)
Flax seeds/Linseeds
Flounder^
Frozen fish food (esp. algae, krill and brine shrimp)
Garbanzos
Gladiolus (Gladiolus spp.)
Goji berries^
Goliath worms^
Gooseberry
Grape Leaf
Grapefruit^
Grapes
Grapevine (vines and root)
Grasshoppers, dead or dried^
Green Beans
Guava^
Halibut^
Hazel leaves
Hazelnuts^
Hemp^
Hempseed Meal
Hibiscus flowers (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis)
Hikari products: brine shrimp, krill, crab cuisine, sea plankton (no preservatives)
Hollyhock flowers
Honey (organic, or at least locally produced, for anti-microbials)
Honeybush
Honeydew Melon
Honeysuckle flowers (Japanese Lonicera japonica)
Horn Melon (Kiwano or Jelly Melon)^
Hornworms, feeders only (never wild caught)^
Hot pepper^
Huckleberries/Bilberries
Indian Almond Leaves
Impatiens (Impatiens wallerana)
Irish Moss
Japanese Maple, leaves or branches, dried or fresh (Acer palmatum)
Jasmine flowers (Jasmine officinale)
Johnny-Jump-Up flowers–(Viola tricolor)
Kale^
Kamut
Kelp
Kiwi
Kohlrabi
Krill^
Lavar (seaweed)^
Lentils
Lettuce (organic only. has little nutrition)
Lilac, flowers, branches and leaves (Syringa vulgaris)
Lima Beans
Liver, unseasoned^
Lobster with crushed exoskeleton
Locusts
Lychee fruit (fresh; no kernel)
Macadamia nuts
Madrona wood
Mango
Mangrove (small live trees can be obtained on eBay, use in water basin)
Maple leaves and branches, all species
Maple syrup
Marion Berries
Mealworms, live, dead or dried^
Milk thistle flowers (Silybum marianum)
Millet^
Mint
Moose^
Mopani Wood^
Most organic baby foods
Mulberry^
Muscadine (grapes)
Mushrooms, all types edible for humans
Mussels
Nasturtium flowers (Tropaeolum majus)
Nectarines^
Nettle, stinging (pour boiling water over leaves first)
Oak Leaves and bark
Oats^
Octopus
Okra
Olives and olive oil (extra virgin)
Oranges
Oysters
Pansy flowers and leaves (Viola X Wittrockiana)
Papaya
Parsley
Parsnip, root and greens
Passionflowers (Passifloraceae - passion flower family)
Passionfruit
Pasta, no added salt or preservates ^
Peaches
Peanut butter (avoid sugar, corn syrup and hydrogenated oils)
Peanuts and shells
Pears
Peas
Pecan bark
Pecans
Peonies^
Persimmon
Petunia blossoms
Phoenix worms^
Pickling cucumbers (Pickles), raw or dried^
Pimentos, no salt or preservatives^
Pine Cones^
Pineapple
Pistachio nuts
Plankton^
Plantain^
Plum
Pomegranate
Popcorn (unseasoned, unflavored, unbuttered)
Pork, unseasoned (no ham)^
Potato (no green parts, including eyes)
Prickly Pear (fruit and cactus)^
Psyllium & husks
Pumpkin, plus entire plant (flowers, seeds, stems & leaves)
Purslane (Portulaca oleracea)
Quinoa (New World grain)
Radish, roots and greens^
Raisins (no sulphur dioxide)
Rasberries
Red raspberry leaves (highest bioavailable calcium source + vit. C and trace minerals)
Reindeer^
Rolled Oats
Rooibus (or rooibos)
Roquette (Eruca vesicaria)
Rose (entire plant)
Rowan^
Royal Jelly
Rubarb (stems only - leaves are poisonous!)^
Russian Olive leaves (Elaeagnus angustifolia)
Safflower Oil^
Sage blossoms (Salvia officinalis)
Salmon^
Sand dollars, untreated
Sardines (canned in water, no salt)^
Sardines
Scallops
Sea biscuits, untreated
Sea fan, untreated
Sea grasses
Sea Horses, untreated^
Sea salt
Sea Sponges
Sea Urchans, untreated^
Seaweed^
Semolina
Sesame oil (in tiny amounts as appetite stimulant)
Sesame seeds (crushed)
Shrimp and exoskeletons, all types
Silkworms^
Snails (use human food grade only; not wild snails)
Sorghum^
Sorrel (Rumex acetosa)
Soy and soy products (human grade; miso, tofu, etc.)
Spelt
Spinach
Spirulina (complete protein and chlorophyll source; highest in beta carotene)
Sprouts (flax, wheat, bean, alfalfa, etc.)
Squash (and squash blossom)
Squid
Star fruit (carambola)
Starfish, untreated^
Strawberry and tops
Sugar cane
Sunflower Seeds (crushed), flowers and leaves (Helianthus)
Superworms^
Swamp cypress wood (false cypress, taxodium sp.)
Sweet potato
Sweetgum^
Sycamore leaf
Tahini (no garlic variety)
Tamarillo
Tangerine
Thimble Berry
Tilapia^
Timothy hay
Tomato
Tomatillo^
Tree Fern
Triticale
Trout^
Tulip flowers (Tulipa spp.)
Tuna
Turkey^
Turnip, roots and greens
Venison^
Viola flowers
Violet flowers (Viola odorata)
Walnuts
Wasa All-Natural Crispbread (Oat flavor)
Watercress
Watermelon
Wax worms, live or dead^
Wheat germ
Wheat grass
Wheat
Whitefish
Whole Wheat Couscous
Wild rice
Worm Castings (organic)^
Zucchini (and zucchini flowers)*


*This food list is mainly adapted from Summer Michealson and Stacey Arenella’s book,
The All-Natural Hermit Crab Sourcebook, and expanded on by Julia Crab and others

** After extensive tests in several EH member tanks, it has been discovered that dairy items are not lethal to crabs. In fact, most crabs really enjoy cheddar cheese, live-culture yogurt, and the occasional drink of milk. While extended long-term testing is still underway, there has been 8 months of trials with no harm to the test crabs. For now, dairy is acceptable, once every 30 to 60 days as a treat. It should not be relied upon as a food base.

^ Denotes HCA Update to the List